Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

I would like all Members and Guest to view CryptoTravel.biz as this is my company I promote.




Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.
Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2019


Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq

rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM

Posts : 176281
Thanked : 11452
Join date : 2012-12-21

Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq Empty Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq

Post by rocky on Mon 18 Nov 2019, 2:51 am

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq



 2019/11/18 00:01:47

WASHINGTON (Reuters) - The leaked classified Iranian intelligence documents on Monday showed how the regime in Tehran exercises power in Iraq through Quds Force commander Qasem Soleimani, the New York Times reported on Monday.
The unprecedented leaks reveal Tehran's "tremendous" influence in Iraq, which shows years of hard work by Iranian spies to choose the country's leaders, pay the salaries of Iraqi proxies working for the Americans to change their positions and infiltrate every aspect of political, economic and religious life in Iraq. Iraq.
According to an Iranian intelligence cable, the current prime minister, Adel Abdul Mahdi, worked in exile closely with Iran while Saddam Hussein was in power in Iraq.
The cable says Abdul Mahdi had a special relationship with Iran's Revolutionary Guards when he was oil minister in 2014.
According to the newspaper, one of the former senior US officials warned of his current downfall, "but no Iraqi politician can become prime minister without the blessing of Iran.
When he became prime minister in 2018, he was seen as a compromise candidate acceptable to both Iran and the United States.
It offers an extraordinary glimpse into the Iranian secret regime. They also detail the extent to which Iraq has fallen under Iranian influence since the US invasion in 2003, which has turned Iraq into a gateway to Iranian power, linking the geography of the Islamic Republic to domination from the shores of the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean.
According to the newspaper, the Iranian intelligence reports that were leaked confirms largely what was already known about Iran's firm grip on Iraqi politics. But far more than previously known reports reveal the extent to which Iran and the United States are using Iraq as a launching pad for spy games.
The reports highlighted the complex domestic policy of the Iranian government, where rival factions are grappling with many of the same challenges faced by US occupation forces as they struggle to stabilize Iraq after the US invasion.
The documents show how, at almost every turn, Iran has outperformed the United States in the competition for influence.
The archive consists of hundreds of reports and leaks written mainly in 2014 and 2015 by Iranian Ministry of Intelligence and Security officers, who were working in the field in Iraq.
According to the newspaper, Iraqi-Iranian meetings were held in dark alleys, shopping malls and Christmas camouflage parties, and documents show intelligence operations in order to take pictures of US soldiers and coalition forces against ISIS and gifts and buy receivables arrived to Kurdish security leaders.
The archives obtained include Iranian intelligence reports written in 2014 and 2015 by Iranian intelligence officers working in Iraq.
An Iranian intelligence report says former Iraqi prime minister Haider al-Abadi "has a close relationship" with Iran.
Iranian intelligence reports show Tehran's goal is to keep Iraq from failing, stop the growth of Sunni militancy on the border with Iran, stop any civil war that makes Shiites its victims and prevent Kurdistan's independence, destabilizing the region while keeping Iraq as a satellite state.
The newspaper says Iran has wooed most CIA agents left behind by Washington in 2011 who feared retaliation and told Tehran everything they knew about CIA operations in Iraq.
Former CIA agents provided Tehran with information about the agency's secret sites, the names of hotels where the agency's foreign agents were staying, details of weapons and training, and the names of Iraqis working for the agency.
"The area around Jurf al-Sakhr has been cleared of terrorist agents, their families evicted, and most of their homes have been destroyed by military forces, uprooted palm trees and burned so that they will not be sheltered.
Lieutenant General Hatem al-Maksousi, head of military intelligence, carried a message to an Iranian intelligence official in Karbala.
The Iraqi intelligence official told his Iranian counterpart that the United States had provided Iraq with an advanced mobile phone eavesdropping program run by Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi's office. "I will put at your disposal all intelligence on it."
In an interview with the newspaper, al-Maksousi denied the authenticity of his cooperation with Iran, but a US official said that when Washington became aware of the Iraqi intelligence official's relations with Iran, it had limited access to sensitive information.
Iranian intelligence reports show that Tehran fears the growth of the US presence in Iraq after 2014 and one of the reports expressed Iran's fear of the growth of US activities in the skies of Iraq over its interests "These activities must be taken seriously"
Following the selection of Haider al-Abadi as prime minister, former Iranian ambassador Hassan Danny Farr called for an urgent meeting at the Iranian embassy in Baghdad, but as the meeting progressed, he was assured that Tehran had many of his ministers "in its pocket." Abadi described at the meeting as "British man and American candidate"
The Iranian ambassador in Baghdad was reviewing Abadi's cabinet ministers, describing Abdul Mahdi and Ibrahim al-Jaafari as having a "special relationship with Iran." That he is Sunni
According to Iranian intelligence documents, Qasim Soleimani asked Iraqi Transport Minister Baqer Jabr al-Zubaidi during a meeting in Baghdad to agree to open Iraqi airspace to Iranian planes to transport weapons to Syria.
According to one document, Baqer Solagh told an Iranian intelligence official that Soleimani came to him and asked that Iranian aircraft be allowed to fly over Iraq to Syria and put Solagh on his eye and told him "out of my eyes" "after Soleimani rose up and kissed me on my forehead."
The details of the Iraqi-American dialogues behind closed doors were routinely reaching Iran, the New York Times reported.
The newspaper says that one of the employees in the office of former Iraqi parliament speaker Salim al-Jubouri was a source of Iranian intelligence.
According to the newspaper, an Iranian intelligence report months after the arrival of Haider al-Abadi to the prime minister's chair shows the desire of the Iraqi prime minister for a secret relationship with Iran. Another report in January 2015 shows Abadi meeting an Iranian intelligence official named Boroujerdi without any third person.
According to another Iranian intelligence report, the Iranian intelligence officer told Abadi that Sunnis are homeless and their cities are destroyed and their future is unclear while Shiites can regain their confidence and that Baghdad and Tehran can benefit from this situation.
An Iranian intelligence report showed that a number of Iranian intelligence officers were outraged that Soleimani was photographed in Iraq because he played a leading role in military operations and that this increases the legitimacy of Americans, especially among Sunnis.


[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM

Posts : 176281
Thanked : 11452
Join date : 2012-12-21

Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq Empty US newspaper publishes documents showing the extent of Iranian interference in Iraq

Post by rocky on Mon 18 Nov 2019, 3:07 am

US newspaper publishes documents showing the extent of Iranian interference in Iraq

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

The [url=https://www.thebaghdadpost.com/ar/Story/t/127/%D9%86%D9%8A%D9%88%D9%8A%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%83 %D8%AA%D8%A7%D9%8A%D9%85%D8%B2][size=13]New York Times[/url] and Intercept website published on Monday Iranian intelligence documents showing Tehran recruiting Iraqi officials, while the documents showed a special relationship between Prime Minister [url=https://www.thebaghdadpost.com/ar/Story/t/17227/%D8%B9%D8%A7%D8%AF%D9%84 %D8%B9%D8%A8%D8%AF %D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%87%D8%AF%D9%8A]Adel Abdul Mahdi[/url] and Iranian authorities.

According to the documents published by the newspaper and the website that it "includes reports prepared by Iranian intelligence officers between 2014 and 2015," noting that "Tehran was recruited to agents 
within the Iraqi authorities, while many senior political, military and security officials in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  have established secret relations with Tehran, 
Many other key members of the government of former prime minister Haider al-Abadi have described close ties with Iran.

The documents showed "the relationship of Prime Minister [url=https://www.thebaghdadpost.com/ar/Story/t/17227/%D8%B9%D8%A7%D8%AF%D9%84 %D8%B9%D8%A8%D8%AF %D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%87%D8%AF%D9%8A]Adel Abdul Mahdi[/url]" [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  ambassadors in Lebanon, Iraq and Syria are appointed by [url=https://www.thebaghdadpost.com/ar/Story/t/674/%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AD%D8%B1%D8%B3 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AB%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%8A]the[/url] Iranian [url=https://www.thebaghdadpost.com/ar/Story/t/674/%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AD%D8%B1%D8%B3 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AB%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%8A]Revolutionary Guards[/url] and not by [url=https://www.thebaghdadpost.com/ar/Story/t/674/%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AD%D8%B1%D8%B3 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AB%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%8A]the[/url] Iranian Foreign Ministry," said
 
a political analyst and adviser on [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  to the Iranian government, Guess Greshi. "We have a large number of allies among Iraqi leaders who can trust our eyes closed," the
 
documents said , adding that "the Iranian presence has not been absent from Baghdad airport," pointing out that "Iranian spies at Baghdad airport watched US soldiers and flights alliance. "
 
according to the newspaper," officials Eran Yin acknowledged that [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  considers monitoring US activity in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] After the US invasion crucial to their national security, when US forces toppled Saddam Hussein, as quoted by [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  quickly some of the best officers from the Ministry of Intelligence and the Organization of Intelligence Revolutionary Guard to Iraq, according to the adviser to the Iranian government and a person belonging to the Guard. "
 
Confirmed the documents" How Iran overtook the United States in Iraq , "pointing out that" Iranian intelligence has considerable influence in the cities of southern Iraq. "
 
She noted the documents that" former Prime Minister Nuri al - Maliki lived in exile in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  in the eighties, and was a favorite of Tehran , "adding that" He was seen as his substitute, Haider A. Ebadi , who was educated in Britain, as more friendly to the West and less sectarian, in the face of uncertainty shrouded the new prime minister. "
 
She said"[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] Hassan Danaii fled at the time, to hold a secret meeting of senior officials at the Iranian embassy, a huge bunker outside Baghdad 's Green Zone building, and with the progress meeting, it became clear that the Iranians have no reason to worry about the new Iraqi government. "
 
Showed" it was Abadi was dismissed as a British man and a candidate for the Americans, but the Iranians thought they had a lot of other ministers in their pocket. He has a special relationship with Iran, where in An interview Jaafari did not deny that he had close ties with Iran, but said he had always dealt with foreign countries based on Iraq's interests, according to the New York Times.
 
"Iran has relied on the loyalty of many lower cabinet members," she said, stressing that "the ministers of municipalities, communications and human rights are in perfect harmony with Iran.
 
"Bayan Jabr, who was leading the Iraqi Interior Ministry at a time when hundreds of prisoners were tortured to death by electric training or briefly shot by death squads, is very close to Iran, but when it comes to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  's education minister, we have no problem," the documents said. With him. "
 
According to the documents, the former minister of municipalities denied having a close relationship with Iran.
 
 
As the former Minister of Communications said,[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] And that he maintained relations with diplomats from many countries, with the former Minister of Education that he "did not receive support from Iran, and that he served at the request of Prime Minister Haider Abadi," according to the newspaper.



[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

[/size]
rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM

Posts : 176281
Thanked : 11452
Join date : 2012-12-21

Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq Empty A US newspaper and website publish Iranian intelligence documents showing Tehran recruiting Iraqi of

Post by rocky on Mon 18 Nov 2019, 3:17 am

[size=35][size=35]A US newspaper and website publish Iranian intelligence documents showing Tehran recruiting Iraqi officials[/size]
[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

Policy

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

2019-11-18 | 02:07
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]



[/size]

Source:
[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

16,909 views


[size=18]The New York Times and Intercept website published on Monday Iranian intelligence documents showing Tehran recruiting Iraqi officials, while the documents showed a special relationship between Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi and Iranian authorities.


According to the documents published by the newspaper and the site that "includes reports prepared by Iranian intelligence officers between 2014 and 2015," noting that " [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  has been recruited to agents within the Iraqi authorities, while several senior political, military and security officials in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  established secret relations with [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , Many other key members of the government of former prime minister [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/133291/%D8%AD%D9%8A%D8%AF%D8%B1 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%AF%D9%8A/ar/]Haider al-Abadi[/url] have described close ties with [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  .





 
The documents showed "relationship with Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi , the Iranian Revolutionary Guard since he was in exile , " pointing out that " the ambassadors of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  in Lebanon, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  and Syria , appointed by the Iranian Revolutionary Guard and not the Iranian Foreign Ministry."
 
[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  has focused on appointing high-level officials in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  ," said political analyst and adviser on [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  to the Iranian government, Guess Greshi. "We have a large number of allies among Iraqi leaders who can trust our eyes closed."[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
[rtl]Related Articles[/rtl]

 
She said the documents "Iranian presence has not gone unnoticed by the airport of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , " pointing out that "spies Iran airport [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  watched US soldiers and flights coalition."
 
According to the newspaper, "Iranian officials acknowledged that [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  considers monitoring US activity in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  after the US invasion is critical to its survival and national security, when US forces toppled Saddam Hussein, where [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  quickly transferred some of its best officers from both the Ministry of Intelligence and the Intelligence Organization of the Revolutionary Guard to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , According to advisers to the Iranian government and someone belonging to the Guard. "

 
The documents confirmed "how Iran overtook the United States in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , " pointing out that "Iranian intelligence has considerable influence in the cities of southern [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  ."
 
"The former prime minister lived in exile in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  in the 1980s and was a favorite of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  ," the documents said. "His replacement, [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/133291/%D8%AD%D9%8A%D8%AF%D8%B1 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%AF%D9%8A/ar/]Haider al-Abadi,[/url] who was educated in Britain, was seen as more friendly to the West and less sectarian, in the face of uncertainty." Shrouded in the new prime minister. "
 
She said , " the payment of Ambassador of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  Hassan Danaii fled at the time, to hold a secret meeting of senior officials at the Iranian embassy, which is a huge building bunker outside the Green Zone to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , and with the progress meeting, it became clear that the Iranians have no reason to worry about the government New Iraq.
 
"Abadi was dismissed as a British man and a candidate for the Americans, but the Iranians thought they had a lot of other ministers in their pocket," she said. He was identified as having a special relationship with [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , where in an interview Jaafari did not deny having close ties to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , but said he had always dealt with foreign countries based on [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  interests , the [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/121258/%D9%86%D9%8A%D9%88%D9%8A%D9%88%D8%B1%D9%83 %D8%AA%D8%A7%D9%8A%D9%85%D8%B2/ar/]New York Times reported[/url] .
 
[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  relied on the loyalty of many lower cabinet members," she said, stressing that "the ministers of municipalities, communications and human rights are in perfect harmony with Iran.
 
"Bayan Jabr, who was leading the Iraqi Interior Ministry at a time when hundreds of prisoners were tortured to death by electric training or briefly shot by death squads, is very close to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , but when it comes to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  's education minister, we have no problem," the documents said. With him. "
 
According to documents, the former Minister of Municipalities and denied the existence of a close relationship with [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , while the minister has admitted the former human rights proximity to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , and praised by [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  to help the Iraqi Shiites during Saddam Hussein 's dictatorship, and to help defeat "Daesh".
 
 
The former minister of communications also said that he "served [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , not [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , and that he maintained relations with diplomats from many countries, while the former education minister said he" did not receive support from [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , and that he served at the request of Prime Minister [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/133291/%D8%AD%D9%8A%D8%AF%D8%B1 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%AF%D9%8A/ar/]Haider al-Abadi[/url] , according to the newspaper .
 
The newspaper quoted Iraqi officials as saying that "Iranian spies are everywhere in the south, and the region has long been a beehive for espionage," noting that "in Karbala in late 2014, an Iraqi military intelligence officer from [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  met with an Iranian intelligence official and offered to spy for [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  And to tell the Iranians everything he can about US activities in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  . "
 
[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  is my second country and I love it," the Iraqi official told the Iranian officer, according to a telegram .
 
He said he "came with a message from his boss in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  Major General [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/3011576674/%D8%AD%D8%A7%D8%AA%D9%85 %D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D9%82%D8%B5%D9%88%D8%B5%D9%8A/ar/]Hatem al-Maqsousi[/url] and then the head of military intelligence at the Iraqi Ministry of Defense." He told them that we are at your service, all you need is at their disposal.
 
"All the intelligence of the Iraqi army, I consider it to you," said General Rasool al-Maqsousi.
 
"If you have a new laptop, give it to me so I can download it," he told the Iranian intelligence officer about the US secret targeting program for the Iraqis and offered to hand it over to the Iranians.
 
"There was more. The United States has also given [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  a highly sensitive mobile phone eavesdropping system, which ran out of the prime minister's office and the headquarters of Iraqi military intelligence," he said.
 
In an interview, now retired General Maksousi opposed "the things that were attributed to him in the cables and denied his work in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  ."
 
Praised by [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  to help in the war against the organization "Daesh", but said he "maintained a close relationship with the United States," pointing out to "I have worked for [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  and did not work in any other country, I was not the intelligence of the Shiite director, but I Director of Intelligence for all [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  . "


[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
[/size]
rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM

Posts : 176281
Thanked : 11452
Join date : 2012-12-21

Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq Empty Re: Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq

Post by rocky on Mon 18 Nov 2019, 3:24 am

The documents revealed a lot about Iranian infiltration in Iraq.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
I'm 1 hour ago.

The documents revealed a lot about Iranian infiltration in Iraq.
Agencies - Abu Dhabi
Leaked secret documents for Iranian intelligence, obtained by the U.S. website Interset and published by The New York Times, revealed Iran's enormous influence in Iraq, which amounted to Tehran's recruitment of operatives within Iraqi authorities.

The unprecedented leak showed Iran's enormous influence in Iraq, and exposed years of hard work by Iranian spies to select the country's leaders, pay salaries to Iraqis working with Americans, pay them to change their allegiances, and Tehran's ongoing operations to infiltrate every aspect of Aspects of political, economic and religious life in Iraq.

The documents reveal details of the espionage operations that appear to be part of a movie, as meetings are arranged in dark alleys and shopping malls or under the cover of a hunting trip or birthday party. Iran's "informants" are also lurking with US soldiers at Baghdad airport, taking photographs of them, as well as monitoring the flights of coalition soldiers.

She also talked about Tehran giving gifts to informants such as pistachios, perfumes and saffron. As for Iraqi officials, it went so far as to bribe some of them, as in one of the leaked reports, which revealed the payment of 87.5 euros to buy gifts for a Kurdish leader.

Related news
Iran's project sees unprecedented fragmentation
Protests of anger undermine the "Iranian Crescent" project
More than 270 protesters were killed in Iraq.
Iraqi army: orders to prevent live ammunition against protesters
Part of the protests in Tehran in June 2018
Why is Tehran afraid of an uprising?
Iran's Supreme Leader Ali Khamenei
Iran contradicts itself in Iraq and Lebanon. Calls for non-interference and intervention.
Iran-Iraq relations "at the highest level"

Among the suspicious details in the leaked documents were the nature of the relationship between Iraqi Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi and the Iranian authorities.

According to one of Iran's leaked intelligence cables, Abdul Mahdi, who worked closely with Iran during his time in exile under Saddam Hussein, had a "special relationship" with Iran, especially when he was oil minister in 2014.

The documents did not explain the nature of that relationship, but no Iraqi politician could become prime minister without Iran's blessing.

Officers from iran's Intelligence Ministry and the Revolutionary Guard were working in parallel with each other in Iraq, reaching their findings, to their headquarters in Tehran, which in turn is organized in reports by the Supreme National Security Council.

Iraqi officials were an essential part of their work, and their mission facilitated the alliances many Iraqi leaders had forged with Iran when they belonged to opposition groups fighting Saddam Hussein.

In the same 2014 documents, which revealed Abdul Mahdi's "special relationship" with Iran, it turns out that senior political, military and security officials in Iraq also maintained secret ties with Tehran.

Among them is former Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi, who has been described as having a "close relationship" with Iran.

"We have a large number of allies among Iraqi leaders, whom we can trust with our eyes closed," said Geiss Ghreshi, a political analyst and adviser on Iraq to the Iranian government.

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM

Posts : 176281
Thanked : 11452
Join date : 2012-12-21

Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq Empty Iran 's spies in Iraq, some heads of government and parliament Iran 's spies in Iraq, some heads of

Post by rocky on Mon 18 Nov 2019, 3:33 am

[rtl]Iran 's spies in Iraq, some heads of government and parliament[/rtl]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]


[rtl]Follow / tomorrow[/rtl]


[rtl]The New York Times revealed secret Iranian intelligence documents showing Tehran's influence and influence on Iraqi governments and what it called "Iraqi agents" working for Iran.[/rtl]


[rtl]According to the newspaper that in mid-October last, and with the escalation of unrest in Baghdad, a familiar visitor quietly came to the Iraqi capital. The city has been under siege for weeks, as protesters marched through the streets, demanding an end to corruption and calling for the overthrow of Prime Minister Adel Abdul Mahdi, in particular, denouncing the huge influence of their neighbor Iran in Iraqi politics, burning Iranian flags and attacking the Iranian consulate.[/rtl]


[rtl]Permanent visitor .. Soleimani and the demonstrations of Iraqis[/rtl]


[rtl]The visitor was there to restore order, but his presence highlighted the biggest grievances of the demonstrators: Maj. Gen. Qasem Soleimani, commander of Iran's powerful Quds Force, came to persuade an ally in the Iraqi parliament to help the Iraqi prime minister hold on to the premiership.[/rtl]


[rtl]This was not the first time General Suleimani was sent to Baghdad to monitor the damage. Tehran's efforts to support Abdul Mahdi are part of its long campaign to preserve Iraq as a gentle client state.[/rtl]


[rtl]The leaked Iranian documents now provide a detailed picture of the extent to which Tehran is aggressively interfering in Iraqi affairs and the unique role of General Soleimani.[/rtl]


[rtl]The documents are contained in an archive of Iran's secret intelligence cables obtained by The Intercept and shared with The New York Times on this report, which is published simultaneously by both news organizations.[/rtl]


[rtl]The unprecedented diversion reveals Tehran's tremendous influence in Iraq, detailing years of hard work by Iranian spies to choose the country's leaders, paying the salaries of Iraqi proxies working for the Americans to change their positions and infiltrate every aspect of Iraq's political, economic and religious life. .[/rtl]


[rtl]Many telegrams describe how meetings are arranged in dark alleys, shopping malls or under the cover of a hunting trip or a birthday party.[/rtl]


[rtl]Detectives lurk at Baghdad airport, take pictures of US soldiers and place tabs on coalition military flights. Clients lead winding roads to meetings to evade surveillance.[/rtl]


[rtl]Iranian bribes to Iraqi officials[/rtl]


[rtl]Bribes are being offered to Iraqi officials, if necessary. The archive contains expense reports from intelligence officers in Iraq, including a report totaling 87.5 euros spent on gifts for a Kurdish commander.[/rtl]


[rtl]According to one leaked Iranian intelligence cable, Abdul Mahdi, who worked closely in exile with Iran while Saddam Hussein was in power in Iraq, had a "special relationship" with the Islamic Republic of Iran when he was oil minister in 2014. The exact nature of that The relationship is not detailed in the telegram, and as a former senior US official warned, "a special relationship can mean a lot of things - that doesn't mean he's an agent of an Iranian government company."[/rtl]


[rtl]But no Iraqi politician can become prime minister without Iran's blessing, and when he became prime minister in 2018, Abdul Mahdi was seen as a compromise candidate acceptable to both Iran and the United States.[/rtl]


[rtl]The leaked cables provide an extraordinary glimpse into the Iranian secret regime. They also detail the extent to which Iraq has fallen under Iranian influence since the US invasion in 2003, which has turned Iraq into a gateway to Iranian power, linking the geography of the Islamic Republic to domination from the shores of the Persian Gulf to the Mediterranean.[/rtl]


[rtl]The leaked Iranian intelligence reports largely confirm what was already known about Iran's strong grip on Iraqi politics. But far more than previously known reports reveal the extent to which Iran and the United States are using Iraq as a launching pad for spy games. They also highlighted the complex domestic policy of the Iranian government, where rival factions are grappling with many of the same challenges faced by US occupation forces as they struggle to stabilize Iraq after the US invasion.[/rtl]


[rtl]Iran surpassed America[/rtl]


[rtl]The documents show how, at almost every turn, Iran has outperformed the United States in the competition for influence.[/rtl]


[rtl]The archive consists of hundreds of reports and telegrams written mainly in 2014 and 2015 by officers of Iran's Ministry of Intelligence and Security, or the Ministry of Interior, who were working in the field in Iraq.[/rtl]


[rtl]The Ministry of Intelligence, the Iranian version of the CIA, has a reputation as an analytical and professional agency, but has been overwhelmed and often overturned by its ideological counterpart, the IRGC Intelligence Organization, which was formally established as an independent entity in 2009 by order of the Iranian leader. Supreme Ayatollah Ali Khamenei.[/rtl]


[rtl]In Iraq, Lebanon and Syria, which Iran considers crucial to its national security, the Revolutionary Guards - particularly the elite Qods Force led by General Soleimani - determine Iran's policies. The ambassadors of these countries are appointed to the highest ranks of the Revolutionary Guards, not the Foreign Ministry, which oversees the Ministry of Intelligence, according to several advisers to current and former Iranian administrations.[/rtl]


[rtl]The sources said that officers from the Ministry of Intelligence and the Revolutionary Guards in Iraq worked in parallel with each other. They reported their findings to their headquarters in Tehran, which he organized in reports to the Supreme National Security Council.[/rtl]


[rtl]Recruiting Iraqi officials was an essential part of their work, and facilitated the alliances that many Iraqi leaders established with Iran when they belonged to opposition groups fighting Saddam Hussein. Several senior political, military, and security officials in Iraq have established secret relations with Tehran, according to the documents.[/rtl]


[rtl]The same 2014 telegram describing Abdul Mahdi's "special relationship" also stated that many other key members of the former cabinet, Haider al-Abadi, had close ties with Iran.[/rtl]


[rtl]Iran has focused on appointing high-ranking officials in Iraq, political analyst and adviser on Iraq, Guess Greshi, said. "We have a large number of allies among the Iraqi leaders who can trust our eyes closed," he said.[/rtl]


[rtl]Three Iranian officials were asked to comment on this article in queries describing the existence of cables and leaked reports. Ali Reza Mirosfi, spokesman for the UN mission in Iran, said he was away until later this month.[/rtl]


[rtl]Majid Takht Ravanshi, Iran's ambassador to the United Nations, did not respond to a written request handed over to his official residence. Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif did not respond to an e-mail request.[/rtl]


[rtl]When contacted by telephone, Hassan Daniyevar, Iran's ambassador to Iraq from 2010 to 2017 and former deputy commander of the naval forces of the Revolutionary Guards, refused to directly address the existence or release of the cables, but noted that Iran had the upper hand in gathering information in Iraq. "Yes, we have a lot of information from Iraq on various issues, especially about what America was doing there."[/rtl]


[rtl]And he said. There is a wide gap between reality and perception of US actions in Iraq. I have a lot of stories to tell. "He declined to clarify.[/rtl]


[rtl]Spy in the Iraqi Foreign Ministry[/rtl]


[rtl]According to reports, after the withdrawal of US forces in 2011, Iran moved quickly to add former CIA informants to salaries. An undated section of the Intelligence Ministry's cable shows that Iran has begun recruiting a spy inside the State Department. It is unclear what brought the recruitment effort.[/rtl]


[rtl]But according to the files, Iran began to interview the source and offered to reward potential pay with salary, gold coins and other gifts. The State Department official is not named in the telegram, but the person is described as a person capable of providing "intelligence insights on the US government's plans in Iraq, whether to deal with ISIS or any other covert operations."[/rtl]


[rtl]"It will be a catalyst for financial cooperation," the report said. The State Department declined to comment.[/rtl]


[rtl]In interviews, Iranian officials acknowledged that Iran considers monitoring US activity in Iraq after the US invasion is crucial to its survival and national security. When US forces toppled Saddam Hussein, Iran quickly transferred some of its best officers from both the Ministry of Intelligence and the IRGC intelligence organization to Iraq.[/rtl]


[rtl]According to advisers to the Iranian government and a person belonging to the Guard. President George W. Bush has declared Iran part of an "axis of evil" and Iranian leaders believe Tehran will be at the top of Washington's list of capitals for regime change after Kabul and Baghdad.[/rtl]


[rtl]Across the world, governments have had to deal with occasional leakage of confidential data or emails as a fact of modern life. This is not the case in Iran, where information is tightly censored and security services are widely feared.[/rtl]


[rtl]Nearly 700 pages of anonymous leaks were sent to The Intercept, which was translated from Farsi into English and shared with The New York Times. Intercept and The Times validate documents but don't know who leaked them. Encrypted channels were communicated with the source, who refused to meet a reporter. In these anonymous messages, the source said they wanted to "inform the world of what Iran is doing in my country, Iraq."[/rtl]


[rtl]Like the internal communications of any spy service, some reports contain preliminary intelligence that is questionable, while others appear to represent the views of intelligence officers and sources with their own agendas.[/rtl]


[rtl]Some cables show uncertainty, such as those describing Iranian spies who broke into a German cultural institute in Iraq only to find that they had the wrong symbols and could not open the vaults. The other officers were beaten by their superiors in Tehran because of laziness, and to return them to headquarters reports that were based solely on news.[/rtl]


[rtl]But by and large, the agents of the Ministry of Intelligence depicted in the documents appear to be patient, professional and practical. Their main tasks are to prevent Iraq from collapsing. From the proliferation of Sunni insurgents on the Iranian border; from descending into sectarian warfare that may make Shiite Muslims targets of violence; The IRGC and General Soleimani also worked to eliminate ISIS, but with a greater focus on preserving Iraq as an Iranian state and making sure that pro-Tehran political factions remain in power.[/rtl]


[rtl]This is the most striking picture at a time of rising tensions between the United States and Iran. Since 2018, when President Trump withdrew from the Iranian nuclear deal and reimposed sanctions, the White House rushed ships to the Persian Gulf and reviewed military plans for war with Iran. In October, the Trump administration promised to send US troops to Saudi Arabia following attacks on oil facilities there that were widely blamed on Iran.[/rtl]


[rtl]Iranian presence in the south[/rtl]


[rtl]With shared doctrine and tribal affiliations that span cross-porous borders, Iran has long been a major presence in southern Iraq. Religious offices have been opened in Iraq's holy cities and posters of Iranian leader Ayatollah Ruhollah Khomeini have been posted on its streets. It supports some of the most powerful political parties in the south, sends Iranian students to study at Iraqi seminars and sends Iranian construction workers to build Iraqi hotels and renovate Iraqi shrines.[/rtl]


[rtl]But while Iran may have defeated the United States in the competition for influence in Baghdad, it has struggled to gain popular support in southern Iraq. Now, as the last six weeks of protests have made clear, they face an unexpectedly strong decline. Across the south, Iranian-backed Iraqi political parties are witnessing the burning of their headquarters and the assassination of their leaders, an indication that Iran may have underestimated Iraq's desire for independence, not only from the United States but also from its neighbor.[/rtl]


[rtl]Iran's rise as a powerful player in Iraq was in many ways a direct result of Washington's lack of any post-invasion plan. The first years after Saddam's fall were chaotic, both in terms of security and the lack of basic services such as water and electricity. For most observers on the ground, it seemed as if the United States was determining policy on the go, in the dark.[/rtl]


[rtl]Among the most disastrous US policies were decisions to dismantle the Iraqi armed forces and purge the government or the new armed forces of any Iraqi who was a member of Saddam's ruling Baath Party. This process, known as de-Baathification, automatically marginalizes most Sunni men. Unemployed and resentful, they formed a violent insurgency targeting Americans and Shiites who are allies of the United States.[/rtl]


[rtl]With the outbreak of sectarian war between Sunnis and Shiites, the Shiite population viewed Iran as a garrison. When ISIS seized territory and cities, Shiite weakness and the failure of the United States to protect them supported the efforts of the Revolutionary Guards and General Soleimani to recruit and mobilize pro-Iranian Shiite militias.[/rtl]


[rtl]According to Intelligence Department documents, Iran continued to take advantage of the opportunities the United States had given it in Iraq. Iran, for example, has reaped a large body of intelligence on US secrets as the American presence began to decline after the withdrawal of US troops in 2011.[/rtl]


[rtl]The CIA has long expelled many of its secret agents in the streets, leaving them unemployed and destitute in a country still shattered by the invasion - and feared being killed because of their links to the United States, and possibly by Iran. Because of the shortage of funds, many began to provide their services to Tehran. They were happy to tell the Iranians all they knew about CIA operations in Iraq.[/rtl]


[rtl]An Iraqi CIA spy turns to Iran[/rtl]


[rtl]In November 2014, one of them, an Iraqi who had spied for the Central Intelligence Agency (CIA), broke up and feared that his relations with the Americans would cost him his life. According to the telegram, the CIA had identified the man as Donnie Brasco. He was contacted by his Iranian handler, simply "Source 134992."[/rtl]


[rtl]Turning to Iran for protection, he said all he knew about gathering US intelligence in Iraq was for sale: CIA safe house sites; names of hotels where CIA agents met clients; details of his weapons and surveillance training; names of other Iraqis working As spies for Americans.[/rtl]


[rtl]The source told 134,992 Iranian agents that he had worked for the agency for 18 months starting in 2008, in a program targeting al Qaeda. He said he was paid well for his work - $ 3,000 a month, plus a one-time bonus of $ 20,000 and a car.[/rtl]


[rtl]But he swore on the Koran, promised to end the days of espionage for the United States, and agreed to write a full report to the Iranians about everything he knew of his time with the CIA[/rtl]


[rtl]"I will forward to you all the documents and videos I have from the course," the Iraqi man told his Iranian therapist, according to an Iranian intelligence report released in 2014. "The photos will identify the profiles of my fellow trainees and subordinates."[/rtl]


[rtl]The CIA declined to comment.[/rtl]


[rtl]Iranian spies everywhere[/rtl]


[rtl]Iraqi officials say Iranian spies are everywhere in the south, and the area has long been a beehive for spying. There, in Karbala in late 2014, an Iraqi military intelligence officer from Baghdad met with an Iranian intelligence official and offered to spy for Iran - and to tell the Iranians everything he could about US activities in Iraq.[/rtl]


[rtl]The Iraqi official told the Iranian officer, according to one of the cables, "Iran is my second country and I love it." In a meeting that lasted more than three hours, al-Iraqi told about his devotion to the Iranian regime, where the clerics rule directly, and his admiration for Iranian films.[/rtl]


[rtl]He said he came with a message from his boss in Baghdad, Major General Hatem al-Maksousi, then the head of military intelligence at the Iraqi Defense Ministry: "Tell them we're at your service. All you need is at their disposal.[/rtl]


[rtl]"All the intelligence of the Iraqi army - I consider it for you," said the messenger of Maj. Gen. Maksousi. He told the Iranian intelligence officer about the secret US targeting program for the Iraqis and offered to hand him over to the Iranians. "If you have a new laptop, give it to me so I can download it," he said.[/rtl]


[rtl]He said there was more. The United States has also granted Iraq a highly sensitive system for eavesdropping on mobile phones, which ran out of the prime minister's office and the headquarters of Iraqi military intelligence. "I will put at your disposal any intelligence that you want," he said.[/rtl]


[rtl]In an interview, Gen. Maksousi, now retired, disagreed, saying the things he had attributed to him in the cables and denied his work in Iran. He praised Iran for its help in the fight against ISIS, but said it had maintained a close relationship with the United States. "I have worked for Iraq and I have not worked in any other country," he said. "I was not the director of intelligence for the Shiites, but I was the director of intelligence for all of Iraq."[/rtl]


[rtl]When asked about the cable, a former US official said that the United States became aware of the Iraqi military intelligence officer's relations with Iran and limited his access to sensitive information.[/rtl]


[rtl]American candidate[/rtl]


[rtl]By late 2014, the United States was once again pouring weapons and soldiers into Iraq when it began fighting the Islamic State. Iran also had an interest in defeating the militants. When ISIS took control of the west and north, young Iraqis traveled through deserts and southern swamps by bus, heading to Iran for military training.[/rtl]


[rtl]Some within the US and Iranian governments believed that the two adversaries should coordinate their efforts against a common enemy. But Iran, as leaked cables make clear, also viewed the growing US presence as a threat and a "cover" to gather intelligence on Iran.[/rtl]


[rtl]"What is happening in the sky over Iraq shows the enormous level of coalition activity," one Iranian officer wrote. "The danger posed by its activity must be taken seriously by the Islamic Republic of Iran."[/rtl]


[rtl]Maliki is a favorite of Iran[/rtl]


[rtl]The rise of ISIS at the same time was driving a wedge between the Obama administration and a large group of Iraqi political class. Mr Obama has pushed for the overthrow of Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki as a condition for renewed US military support. He believes that Mr. Maliki's brutal policies and crackdowns on Iraqi Sunnis have helped the rise of militants.[/rtl]


[rtl]Maliki, who lived in exile in Iran in the 1980s, was a favorite of Tehran. His replacement, Haider al-Abadi, who was educated in Britain, was seen as more friendly to the West and less sectarian. Faced with the uncertainty of a new prime minister, then-Iranian ambassador Hassan Danyevar called for a secret meeting of senior officials at the Iranian embassy, ​​a huge fortified building outside Baghdad's Green Zone.[/rtl]


[rtl]As the meeting progressed, it became clear that the Iranians had no reason to worry about the new Iraqi government. Mr Abadi was dismissed as a "British man" and a "candidate for the Americans," but the Iranians thought they had many other ministers in their pocket.[/rtl]


[rtl]One by one, Danyar listed the members of the government, describing their relations with Iran.[/rtl]


[rtl]Ibrahim al-Jaafari - a former Iraqi prime minister and by late 2014 a foreign minister - was identified, like Mr. Mahdi, as having a "special relationship" with Iran. In an interview, Mr. Jaafari did not deny that he had close relations with Iran, but said he had always dealt with foreign countries based on Iraq's interests.[/rtl]


[rtl]Iran relied on the loyalty of many lower cabinet members.[/rtl]


[rtl]Municipalities, communications and human rights ministers are "in perfect harmony and one with us and our people," the report said. "He works with us, although he is Sunni," the environment minister said. Bayan Jabr, who was leading the Iraqi Interior Ministry at a time when hundreds of prisoners were tortured to death by electric training or shot at them briefly by Shiite death squads - "very close" to Iran. When it comes to Iraq's education minister, the report says, "We will have no problem with him."[/rtl]


[rtl]All former ministers of municipalities, communications and human rights were members of the Badr Organization, a political and military group that Iran founded in the 1980s to oppose Saddam Hussein. The former minister of municipalities denied having a close relationship with Iran. The former Minister of Human Rights acknowledged his closeness to Iran, and praised Iran for assisting Shiite Iraqis during Mr. Hussein's dictatorship, and for helping defeat the Islamic State. The former communications minister said he served Iraq, not Iran, and that he maintained relations with diplomats from many countries; the former education minister said he was not supported by Iran and that he served at the request of Prime Minister Abadi. The former Minister of Environment cannot be reached for comment.[/rtl]


[rtl]Fall 2014[/rtl]


[rtl]Iran's dominance of Iraqi politics is evident in one important episode in the fall of 2014, when Baghdad was a city at the heart of a multinational spiral. The Syrian civil war was raging in the West, with ISIS fighters taking about a third of Iraq and US troops heading to the region to confront the worsening crisis.[/rtl]


[rtl]Against this chaotic background, Mr. Jabr, then the Minister of Transport, welcomed General Suleimani, the Qods Force commander, to his office. General Suleimani had asked in his favor that Iran needed access to Iraqi airspace to transport aircraft loaded with weapons and other supplies to support the Syrian regime of Bashar al-Assad in his battle against US-backed insurgents.[/rtl]


[rtl]It was a request to place Mr. Jabr at the center of the long rivalry between the United States and Iran. Obama administration officials have been pressing hard to persuade Iraqis to stop Iranian flights through their airspace, but Iraq's transport minister has found face to face that it is impossible to refuse.[/rtl]


[rtl]He said General Suleimani "came to me and asked that we allow Iranian aircraft to use Iraqi airspace to pass to Syria," according to one of the cables. The Minister of Transport did not hesitate, and General Soleimani seemed happy. "I put my hands on my eyes and I said," on my eyes! Mr. Jabr told the Ministry of Intelligence officer. "Then he got up and approached me and kissed my forehead."[/rtl]


[rtl]Mr. Jabr confirmed the meeting with General Soleimani, but said flights from Iran to Syria carry humanitarian supplies and religious pilgrims traveling to Syria to visit holy sites, not weapons and military supplies to help Mr. Assad, as US officials believe.[/rtl]


[rtl]Meanwhile, Iraqi officials known for their relations with the United States have been subjected to special scrutiny, and Iran has taken measures to counter US influence. Indeed, many files show that while senior US diplomats met behind closed doors with their Iraqi counterparts in Baghdad, their talks were routinely sent to the Iranians.[/rtl]


[rtl]Salim al-Jubouri and Iran[/rtl]


[rtl]During 2014 and 2015, when the new Iraqi government stabilized, US Ambassador Stuart Jones met frequently with Salim al-Jubouri, who was speaker of the Iraqi parliament until last year. Mr. Jubouri, despite being a Sunni, was known for a close relationship with Iran, but the files now reveal that one of his senior political advisers - known as Source 134832 - was an asset of Iranian intelligence. The source said to his Iranian treatment: "I lecture in his office on a daily basis and followed his contacts carefully with the Americans." Mr. Jubouri, in an interview, said that he did not believe that anyone in his staff was acting as an agent of Iran, and that he fully trusted his aides. (Mr. Jones declined to comment.)[/rtl]


[rtl]The source urged the Iranians to develop closer ties with Mr. Jubouri, to hinder US efforts to nurture a new class of young Sunni leaders in Iraq and perhaps to achieve reconciliation between Sunnis and Shiites. The source warned that Iran must act to prevent the speaker from "slipping into a pro-American position, because one of the characteristics of Salem al-Jubouri is credibility and hasty decisions."[/rtl]


[rtl]Another report reveals that Nechirvan Barzani, the prime minister of Kurdistan, met with senior US and British officials and Mr. Abadi, the Iraqi prime minister, in Baghdad in December 2014, and then went immediately to meet with an Iranian official to tell him everything. Through a spokesman, Mr. Barzani said he did not remember the meeting with any Iranian officials at the time, describing the cable as "baseless and unfounded". He said he "totally denies" telling the Iranians the details of his talks with the Americans and British. Diplomats.[/rtl]


[rtl]At times, the Iranians also saw commercial value in the information they received from their Iraqi sources.[/rtl]


[rtl]The United States is interested in reaching a rich natural gas field in Crutch near the Iraqi border with Syria, according to a report from al-Jubouri's adviser. The source said that Americans may eventually try to export natural gas to Europe, a major market for Russian natural gas. "It is recommended that the above information be used in exchange with the Russians and Syria," Intrigued, an intelligence ministry officer, wrote in a telegram to Tehran. The telegram was written as Russia was dramatically stepping up its engagement in Syria, and while Iran continued its military buildup there, in support of President Assad.[/rtl]


[rtl]Abadi has secret relations with Iranian intelligence[/rtl]


[rtl]Although Iran initially doubted Mr. Abadi's loyalties, a report written a few months after he came to the premiership indicated that he was fully prepared to establish a secret relationship with Iranian intelligence. A January 2015 report details a private meeting between Abadi and an intelligence ministry officer, known as Boroujerdi, held in the prime minister's office "without a secretary or third person."[/rtl]


[rtl]During the meeting, Boroujerdi met about the Sunni-Shiite divide in Iraq, in search of Mr. Abadi's feelings on the most sensitive subject in Iraqi politics. "Today, Sunnis find themselves in the worst possible circumstances and have lost their confidence," the intelligence officer said, according to the cable. "Sunnis are homeless, their cities are ruined and an uncertain future awaits them, while the Shiites can regain their self-confidence."[/rtl]


[rtl]Boroujerdi continued the Shiites in Iraq "at a historic turning point." The Iraqi government and Iran can "take advantage of this situation."[/rtl]


[rtl]According to the telegram, the prime minister expressed his "full agreement". Mr Abadi declined to comment.[/rtl]


[rtl]We must consider reducing violence against innocent Sunnis in Iraq and limiting Mr. Soleimani's measures. Otherwise, violence and conflict between Shiites and Sunnis will continue. For now, any action against the Sunnis will be blamed on Iran, whether Iran has a direct or indirect role, or nothing at all.[/rtl]


[rtl]Since the start of the Iraq war in 2003, Iran has advanced itself as the protector of the Shiites in Iraq, and General Soleimani, more than anyone else, has used the dark arts of espionage and covert military action to ensure that Shiite power remains on the rise. But this came at the expense of stability, with Sunnis permanently deprived of their rights and looking to other groups, such as the Islamic State, to protect them.[/rtl]


[rtl]The 2014 massacre in the agricultural community of Jurf al-Sakhr was a clear example of the kinds of sectarian atrocities committed by armed groups loyal to the Iranian Qods Force that have upset the United States throughout the Iraq war and undermined reconciliation efforts. As field reports show, Iran's intelligence ministry has shared some US concerns. This points to divisions within Iran over its policies in Iraq between more moderate elements under President Hassan Rouhani and armed factions such as the Revolutionary Guards.[/rtl]


[rtl]The cliff, located just east of Fallujah in the Euphrates River valley, is rich in orange trees and palm groves. They were invaded by ISIS in 2014, giving fighters a foothold from which to launch attacks on the holy cities of Karbala and Najaf.[/rtl]


[rtl]The rock cliff is also important for Iran because it lies on a route used by Shiite religious pilgrims to travel to Karbala during Muharram, a month-long celebration of the death of the grandson of the Prophet Muhammad, Imam Hussein, a respected Shia figure.[/rtl]


[rtl]When Iranian-backed Shiite militias expelled militants from Jurf al-Sakhr in late 2014, the first major victory over the Islamic State, it became a ghost town. It is no longer a threat to the thousands of Shiite pilgrims going through it, but the Iranian victory came at a high cost to the city's Sunni population. Tens of thousands were displaced, and a local politician, the only Sunni member of the provincial council, was found shot in the head.[/rtl]


[rtl]One telegram describes the damage in almost biblical terms. “As a result of these operations,” the author says, “the area around Jurf al-Sakher has been cleared of terrorist operatives. Their families have been displaced, military forces have destroyed most of their homes and the rest will be destroyed. People 's cattle (cattle and sheep) were scattered and grazed without their owners. "[/rtl]


[rtl]Operation Cliff of the Rock and other bloody actions led by Iranian proxies and directed from Tehran increased the isolation of Iraq's Sunni population, according to one report, which notes that "the destruction of villages and homes and the looting of Sunni property and livestock have turned the sweetness of these successes" against the Islamic State into "bitterness." ". One cable in Jurf al-Sakhr casts the influence of Shia militias in particularly stringent terms: "In all areas where the Popular Mobilization Forces enter, Sunnis are fleeing, abandoning their homes and property, preferring to live in tents as refugees or camp residents."[/rtl]


[rtl]The Ministry of Intelligence feared that Iran's gains in Iraq would be squandered because Iraqis hated Shiite militias and the Qods Force that sponsored them. Above all, its officers blamed General Suleimani, who saw him as a dangerous catalyst who used the anti-IS campaign as a springboard for a political career back home in Iran. One report, which states above that he will not be shared with the Quds Force, criticizes the general for his personal role in the military campaign in Iraq by "posting pictures of himself on various social media sites."[/rtl]


[rtl]Doing so made it clear that Iran controls the appalling Shiite militias - a potential gift to its adversaries. The report said: "This Iranian policy in Iraq" allowed the Americans to return to Iraq with greater legitimacy. The groups and individuals who were fighting against the Americans among the Sunnis now hope that America alone, not even Israel, will enter Iraq and save Iraq from the clutches of Iran.[/rtl]


[rtl]Iranian soft power[/rtl]


[rtl]At times, the Iranians have sought to counter the bad will of their presence in Iraq with soft power campaigns that resemble American battlefield efforts to win "hearts and minds." Hoping to gain "the advantage of publicizing and restoring Iran's image among the people," Iran has developed a plan to send pediatricians and gynecologists to villages in northern Iraq to manage health services, according to one field report. However, it is not clear whether this initiative has been achieved.[/rtl]


[rtl]As often, Iran will use its leverage to close lucrative development deals. As Iraq relies on Iran for military support in the war against the Islamic State, one cable shows that the Qods Force is receiving oil and development contracts from Iraqi Kurds in exchange for weapons and other aid. In the south, Iran has been awarded contracts for sewage and water purification by paying a $ 16 million bribe to a member of parliament, according to another field report.[/rtl]


[rtl]Today, Iran is struggling to maintain its hegemony in Iraq, as the Americans did after the 2003 invasion. At the same time, Iraqi officials are increasingly concerned that provocation in Iraq from any side could trigger a war between the two rivals for hegemony in their homeland. Against this geopolitical background, Iraqis have long learned to take a pragmatic approach to the initiatives of Iran's spies - even Sunni Iraqis who view Iran as an enemy.[/rtl]


[rtl]"Not only does he not believe in Iran, but he does not believe that Iran may have positive intentions toward Iraq," an Iranian case officer wrote in late 2014, about an Iraqi intelligence recruiter he described as former Baathist work for him. Saddam Hussein and then the CIA "but he is a professional spy and understands the reality of Iran and Shiite in Iraq and will cooperate to save himself."[/rtl]

[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM

Posts : 176281
Thanked : 11452
Join date : 2012-12-21

Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq Empty An American newspaper and website publish Iranian intelligence documents revealing the extent of Ira

Post by rocky on Mon 18 Nov 2019, 3:39 am

An American newspaper and website publish Iranian intelligence documents revealing the extent of Iranian influence in Iraq
by [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] 2 Hours ago
[You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
The New York Times, in cooperation with the US Intercept website, published Iranian intelligence documents revealing the extent of Iranian influence in Iraq.
The documents, written by officers of Iran's Ministry of Intelligence and Security in 2004, show how Iran overtook the United States in
Iraq, especially with the fall of 1414.
The documents show that the Iranian presence has not been absent from Baghdad airport through spies who monitored American soldiers and international coalition flights, as well as recruiting Iran to a State Department official to provide Washington with plans in Iraq.
The documents pointed out that Iran considers monitoring US activity in Iraq a necessity for its survival and national security by establishing relations with Iraqi political, security and military officials, focusing on appointing high-ranking officials in Iraq, and always relying on ministers in successive Iraqi governments, as well as briefing them on Details of meetings between US and Iraqi officials.


[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

Sponsored content

Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq Empty Re: Secret documents published for the first time explain how Iran exercises power in Iraq

Post by Sponsored content


    Current date/time is Thu 12 Dec 2019, 10:53 pm