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possible revolt in ISIS ranks in Mosul

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jedi17
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possible revolt in ISIS ranks in Mosul

Post by jedi17 on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 7:14 pm

June 27, 2016
Possible revolt in ISIS ranks in Mosul
By Rick Moran
The Iraqi army is approaching the city of Mosul from two directions and has already pushed ISIS out of some outlying districts.
But inside the city, there appears to be a significant revolt.  Several ISIS fighters have been ambushed and killed, while some of the ISIS turncoats have been executed in recent days, including four commanders.


Former Nineveh Province Governor Atheel Al-Nujaifi, who commands the National Mobilization Force of Sunni fighters, confirms that attacks are taking place inside Mosul with increased frequency.
“There was an attack in the Old City of Mosul on Friday. A man threw a hand grenade at Daesh militants. He was captured, executed and his body dragged through the streets behind a truck,” Nujaifi told the Washington Free Beacon by telephone Sunday. Daesh is an alternative name for ISIS.
“In another incident, an ISIS militant was shouting at a local woman who was not wearing her head scarf and an unknown man attacked the Daesh soldier with a knife,” Al-Nujaifi added.
The news site Sumaria reported Friday that Daesh militia are looking for unknown people in Mosul who tore up Daesh posters and pictures of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi in different areas in the city. There are also reports of firefights within the ISIS police force as tension mounts and morale for the ISIS soldiers plummets. According to a Friday report by the Iraqi newspaper Mada, seven Daesh terrorists were killed in internal clashes between Daesh’s Islamic rules police, thehisbah, and security members.
Some Iraqi politicians have predicted that an insurrection will break out as the Iraqi army moves closer to liberating Mosul. An MP from Ninewa, Ahmed Al-Jubouri, who also leads an armed group, told an Iraqi newspaper on Wednesday that “People of Mosul are awaiting the start of the Ninewa liberation operations in order to revolt against Daesh.” He also says some of his fighters sneaked into Mosul city to carry out assassinations against ISIS terrorists.
ISIS executed four of its top commanders in a public square in Mosul on Wednesday, according to multiple sources, including Bas News, a Kurdish news site. The commanders reportedly were convicted by a Sharia Court for high treason on June 22nd and hanged in Mosul the same day, according to media reports. The executions follow the hanging or beheading of 21 ISIS commanders since April and the executions of scores of ISIS fighters charged with desertion or collaborating with Iraqi Army agents.

The Islamic State is an organization heavily dependent on its myth of invincibility and its reputation for extraordinary cruelty.  This psychological edge showed up when poorly led Iraqi army units threw down their weapons and ran away from battle, even though they outnumbered ISIS fighters.
But Shia militias – sometimes under the direct command of Iranian Revolutionary Guards  match ISIS cruelty with fanaticism.  Their recent victory in Fallujah showed an ability to confront ISIS fighters on equal terms.
We have heard whispers in the past of unrest among ISIS fighters who come under seige by Iraqi forces.  But what's happening in Mosul appears to be the real deal  a significant revolt against ISIS leadership.  It probably won't make the job of liberating Mosul any easier.  ISIS has its own fanatics willing to carry out suicide attacks and stand their ground ’til death.  But perhaps what seemed an impossible task last year can now barely be discerned as doable.

The Iraqi army is approaching the city of Mosul from two directions and has already pushed ISIS out of some outlying districts.
But inside the city, there appears to be a significant revolt.  Several ISIS fighters have been ambushed and killed, while some of the ISIS turncoats have been executed in recent days, including four commanders.
Washington Free Beacon:
Former Nineveh Province Governor Atheel Al-Nujaifi, who commands the National Mobilization Force of Sunni fighters, confirms that attacks are taking place inside Mosul with increased frequency.
“There was an attack in the Old City of Mosul on Friday. A man threw a hand grenade at Daesh militants. He was captured, executed and his body dragged through the streets behind a truck,” Nujaifi told the Washington Free Beacon by telephone Sunday. Daesh is an alternative name for ISIS.
“In another incident, an ISIS militant was shouting at a local woman who was not wearing her head scarf and an unknown man attacked the Daesh soldier with a knife,” Al-Nujaifi added.
The news site Sumaria reported Friday that Daesh militia are looking for unknown people in Mosul who tore up Daesh posters and pictures of ISIS leader Abu Bakr al Baghdadi in different areas in the city. There are also reports of firefights within the ISIS police force as tension mounts and morale for the ISIS soldiers plummets. According to a Friday report by the Iraqi newspaper Mada, seven Daesh terrorists were killed in internal clashes between Daesh’s Islamic rules police, thehisbah, and security members.
Some Iraqi politicians have predicted that an insurrection will break out as the Iraqi army moves closer to liberating Mosul. An MP from Ninewa, Ahmed Al-Jubouri, who also leads an armed group, told an Iraqi newspaper on Wednesday that “People of Mosul are awaiting the start of the Ninewa liberation operations in order to revolt against Daesh.” He also says some of his fighters sneaked into Mosul city to carry out assassinations against ISIS terrorists.
ISIS executed four of its top commanders in a public square in Mosul on Wednesday, according to multiple sources, including Bas News, a Kurdish news site. The commanders reportedly were convicted by a Sharia Court for high treason on June 22nd and hanged in Mosul the same day, according to media reports. The executions follow the hanging or beheading of 21 ISIS commanders since April and the executions of scores of ISIS fighters charged with desertion or collaborating with Iraqi Army agents.
[size]
The Islamic State is an organization heavily dependent on its myth of invincibility and its reputation for extraordinary cruelty.  This psychological edge showed up when poorly led Iraqi army units threw down their weapons and ran away from battle, even though they outnumbered ISIS fighters.
But Shia militias – sometimes under the direct command of Iranian Revolutionary Guards  match ISIS cruelty with fanaticism.  Their recent victory in Fallujah showed an ability to confront ISIS fighters on equal terms.
We have heard whispers in the past of unrest among ISIS fighters who come under seige by Iraqi forces.  But what's happening in Mosul appears to be the real deal  a significant revolt against ISIS leadership.  It probably won't make the job of liberating Mosul any easier.  ISIS has its own fanatics willing to carry out suicide attacks and stand their ground ’til death.  But perhaps what seemed an impossible task last year can now barely be discerned as doable.[/size]

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Cracks show inside Islamic State's shrinking caliphate

Post by jedi17 on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 7:41 pm


Cracks show inside Islamic State's shrinking caliphate



By Maher Chmaytelli and Isabel ColesJune 28, 2016



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An Islamic State flag hangs amid electric wires over a street in Ain al-Hilweh Palestinian refugee camp, near the port-city of Sidon, southern Lebanon January 19, 2016. REUTERS/Ali Hashisho

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By Maher Chmaytelli and Isabel Coles
ERBIL, Iraq (Reuters) - It was barely more than a squiggle, but the mark of a single letter sprayed overnight on a wall in the heart of Islamic State's self-proclaimed caliphate was a daring act of dissent.
The next day, ultra-hardline Islamic State fighters came and scrubbed out the "M" -- the first letter of the word for "resistance" in Arabic -- which appeared in an alley near the Grand Mosque in the Iraqi city of Mosul about three weeks ago.
A video of the single letter, scrawled about a meter long on the wall, was shared with Reuters by an activist from a group called "Resistance", whose members risk certain execution to conduct small acts of defiance in areas under Islamic State rule.
Nearly two years since Islamic State leader Abu Bakr al-Baghdadi delivered a sermon from that same mosque summoning Muslims worldwide to the "caliphate", it is fraying at the edges.
As an array of forces make inroads into their territory spanning Iraq and Syria, the jihadis are becoming even harsher to maintain control of a population that is increasingly hostile to them, according to Iraqi officials and people who managed to escape.
"They are harsh, but they are not strong," said Major General Najm al-Jubbouri, who is in command of the operation to recapture Mosul and the surrounding areas. "Their hosts reject them."
Many local Sunnis initially welcomed the Sunni Muslim militants as saviors from a Shi'ite-led government they perceived as oppressive, while thousands of foreigners answered Baghdadi's call to come and wage holy war.
For a time, the militants claimed one victory after another, thanks as much to the weakness and division of the forces arrayed against them as their own strength. They funded themselves through sales of oil from fields they overran, and plundered weapons and ammunition from those they vanquished.
But two years since the declaration of the caliphate, the tide has begun to turn in favor of its many enemies: Iraqi and Syrian government troops, Kurdish forces in both countries, rival Syrian Sunni rebels, Iranian-backed Shi'ite militias, and a U.S.-led coalition which has bombed the militants while conducting special operations to take out their commanders.
Of the 43 founders of Islamic State, also known as ISIS, ISIL or Daesh, 39 have been killed, said Hisham al-Hashimi, a Baghdad-based expert who advises the Iraqi government.
The self-proclaimed caliph, Baghdadi, is moving in a semi-desert plain that covers several thousand square kilometers west of the Tigris river and south of Mosul, avoiding Syria after two of his close aides were killed there this year: "war minister" Abu Omar al-Shishani and top civilian administrator and second-in-command Abd al-Rahman al-Qaduli, Hashimi said.
The most senior commanders after Baghdadi are now Abu Mohammed al-Adnani, the group's spokesman who took over military supervision after Shishani's death, and Abu Muhammad al-Shimali, who oversees foreign fighters and succeeded Qaduli as civilian administrator, he said.
Kurdish and Iraqi military commanders say the group is deploying fighters who are less experienced and less ideologically committed to defend what remains of its quasi-state, which is under attack on multiple fronts.
Iraqi forces recently entered the Islamic State bastion of Falluja just west of Baghdad, and are pushing north towards Mosul, by far the biggest city Islamic State controls with a pre-war population of 2 million.
In neighboring Syria, U.S.-backed forces are closing in on the militant stronghold of Manbij, and President Bashar al-Assad's Russian-backed army has advanced into the province surrounding the de facto Islamic State capital Raqqa.
On a front south of Mosul, a group of women displaced by the offensive said Islamic State fighters' grip had begun to loosen as Iraqi forces advanced, to the point that they no longer punished people for not wearing the full face veil.
The number of foreign fighters has fallen significantly, and renewed efforts by the group to recruit locals have proven largely unsuccessful, except amongst the young and destitute, according to people who recently fled, including three repentant Islamic State members.
"When you are a young man and you don't own 250 dinars and someone comes and offers you 20,000, 15,000 or 30,000, you will do anything," said a former Islamic State militant from Iraq's northern Hawija district who recently gave himself up to Kurdish forces.

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Re: possible revolt in ISIS ranks in Mosul

Post by jedi17 on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 7:43 pm

this may not take as long as i thought it would.  Once Iraqi forces enter the city, I am sure that this resistance will hand over any local who has served ISIS inside Mosul.

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Re: possible revolt in ISIS ranks in Mosul

Post by Neno on Wed 29 Jun 2016, 7:51 pm

Need those other 4 leaders crucified too.

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Re: possible revolt in ISIS ranks in Mosul

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