Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Iraq Dinar/News is a popular topic among many topics this board offers.

See the footer of the board for our Facebook and My business pages.

Be sure and join our Dinar Only Newsletter Email list. It is located on the right. Your User Account Email when joining the board is for with in Neno's Place use of board information which you can control in your profile settings.

Neno

NOTES:
For "Advertising" with in my board to our Membership and Visitors see our "Sponsor Ad Info" in the Navbar. Neno's Place receives a low of 50,000 views a week to over 100,000 plus many times thru out the year.

I can be reached by phone or text 7am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.
Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Longest Dinar holding Community. Reach Admin by Private Message. Copyright © 2006-2017


On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul

Share

jedi17
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1877
Thanked : 463
Join date : 2013-02-20

On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul

Post by jedi17 on Tue 30 Aug 2016, 4:41 pm


On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul



Ash Gallagher
August 29, 2016



View photos



Peshmerga trainees aim for their targets at a coalition training base. (Photo: Ash Gallagher/Yahoo News)

More

ERBIL, Iraq — Kurdish peshmerga forces in Northern Iraq raise their rifles during another day of training; Italian soldiers carefully instruct them on how to accurately hit their target, which is a dummy board 25 meters away.
For many peshmerga, it is the first time they have fired an M16 assault rifle. They are learning new methods of fighting and experimenting with new firearms.
They are exchanging Russian weapons for American ones.
Their shots pop across the field, and small puffs of smoke jump off the ground as bullet shells are shed on the grassy hills.
When they’ve finished their rounds, they walk down the line to their targets with coalition trainers to review their shots and see if they made their target.
In another area of the base, soldiers sit in the shade with unloaded M16s, practicing disassembling and reassembling the weapons. Each one carefully lays the pieces of the weapon in front of him and then works out the right way to put it back together again.
At three different locations in Northern Iraq, the United States and coalition forces from seven nations are training nearly 2,500 peshmerga soldiers in infantry tactics, heavy weapons training as well as medical and chemical training.
At this base, Italian soldiers were conducting most of the training. The American military is not directly training the peshmerga, but takes a supporting role, advising on U.S. weapons and equipment.
The Kurdish peshmerga soldiers have a reputation as one of the toughest fighting forces in the region.
They are in training, now, for what some consider one of the most important battles in the war against the Islamic State — the fight to retake Mosul. The armed group has controlled the key Iraqi city for more than two years.
A U.S. Army spokesperson in Erbil told Yahoo News, “The training is 10 weeks. [Then] they’re given back to the ministry of peshmerga” to be assigned to units facing off with fighters from the Islamic State.
Some of the men were old enough to have adult sons and have been fighting for many years. But the U.S. spokesperson believes their experience will help with the younger soldiers and in the fight ahead.
“Some have [already] been on the front line,” the spokesperson said. “They’re motivated, and we give them brand-new equipment.”
The peshmerga soldiers seemed grateful to the coalition forces for their training and excited to learn new tactics.
Between training sets, they laugh and joke with each other, but when it’s time to focus, they work hard over the long days of the burning summer.
One of the peshmerga ground commanders, Wassim, has 32 men under him; he told Yahoo News, “We learn [to fight] three ways: while stand, on our knees and on the ground. We also learn about IEDs [improvised explosive devices].” Identifying and dealing with IEDs is an essential skill for fighting ISIS.
Another soldier, Aram, who had only been training for two weeks, said, “We want to thank the coalition for the training, and we feel we are more ready. We are learning many things.”






Coalition trainers help Kurdish peshmerga check their shots at the shooting range. (Photo: Ash Gallagher/Yahoo News)

More

The United States government announced in April it would commit nearly $415 million to aid the peshmerga forces, for various purposes including weapons, training and monthly stipends for fighters.
A military spokesman for coalition operations in Iraq and Syria, Col. John Dorrian told Yahoo News: “We [the U.S.] do provide a lot of funding for the peshmerga and continue to do so because they are a critical element, but ultimately the framework that we have says that the government of Iraq is in charge.”
The entire coalition is made up of 60 countries, and the aim that unites everyone, Dorrian said, is to defeat ISIS. “One unifying factor, all of these groups, everyone has an interest in the eradication of ISIS,” he said. “They have to be militarily defeated here, as a foundational step, and then continued work must be done to drain the swamp on their sick ideology.”

Coalition forces have been closing in on Mosul since the Iraqi army took control of a key town, Qayyara, in recent days. ISIS fighters set fire to the oil wells when they fled. But the Iraqi army officials are confident their operations are putting them in a good position to defeat the armed group.
As for the peshmerga, they will play a supporting role to the Iraqi army in taking back Mosul.
Jabar Yawar, the chief of staff and spokesperson for the Peshmerga Ministry, said in a statement to Yahoo News, “We decided to participate in the liberation of Mosul, but what our role [will be], we do not know. We have not had any formal meeting with the Iraqi leadership and the coalition leadership about what role to put our forces.”
Yawar went on to explain they hope to work with the Iraqi government on a plan for an administrative role in the government after the city has been liberated.
The U.S. military says it is partnering with the coalition forces, and while it will provide airstrikes, its role on the ground will continue to be in an “advise and assist” capacity. The U.S. has officials who will work with the Iraqi army forces on battle logistics and tactical strategy.


Kurdish peshmerga gather at shooting range for training. 

 
With the fight intensifying, humanitarian concerns have risen. A camp in the northern province of Nineveh reported that more than 4,000 internally displaced people (IDP) arrived in the past two weeks.
Aid groups are scrambling to get food and assistance to those who are able to escape from Mosul, but they are also trying to anticipate a mass movement of Iraqi citizens in the coming weeks while forces push closer.
Yawar stated the peshmerga are working with humanitarian organizations to set up camps near the cities of Dohuk and Makmour.
But according to Iraqi media reports, the Kurdish minister for migration and displacement has said Mosul IDPs will be pushed to resettle in Iraqi-army-controlled areas of the country.
A major concern for the aftermath is how to ensure that ISIS fighters don’t escape Mosul and establish a new foothold in northern Iraq.
For the men still training, they know the time is coming when they will have to risk their lives for their homeland. But they are confident and believe they have the military strength and training to help defeat one of the worst threats they have ever faced.

jedi17
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1877
Thanked : 463
Join date : 2013-02-20

Re: On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul

Post by jedi17 on Tue 30 Aug 2016, 4:43 pm

Yawar went on to explain they hope to work with the Iraqi government on a plan for an administrative role in the government after the city has been liberated.


this is the political BS I was mentioning.  

jedi17
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1877
Thanked : 463
Join date : 2013-02-20

Re: On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul

Post by jedi17 on Tue 30 Aug 2016, 5:01 pm

OPINIONWAR & CONFLICT15 MAY 2016


Liberating Mosul will not solve Iraq's problems

If Mosul were to fall tomorrow it would be a blow - but not a fatal blow - for ISIL.


An Iraqi soldier holds up his rifle in front of a building destroyed by an airstrike in a village south of Mosul, Iraq [Reuters]


Luke Coffey is a research fellow specialising in transatlantic and Eurasian security at a Washington DC based think tank. He previously served as a special adviser to the British defence secretary and was a commissioned officer in the United States army.

The liberation of Mosul is in the early days of execution, but as the central government in Baghdad and policymakers in the US will soon find out, liberating the city and kicking out ISIL (also known as ISIS) will be the easy part. 
The real challenge will be finding a political settlement that allows the local Sunni inhabitants to address their legitimate political grievances with the central government in Baghdad. 
It is in this area that the battle for Mosul will be truly won or lost.
Iraq's Hoshyar Zebari says 'Mosul is key'
[size]

Even though there has been much media reporting on the upcoming offensive to retake Mosul from ISIL, there are many reasons why we should not expect a swift liberation of the city. 
Mosul is Iraq's second-largest city, and urban warfare is no easy task as the recent operation to liberate Ramadi has shown.

A slow long fight

Ramadi has a population of around 200,000 compared with Mosul's estimated population of 1.8 million (albeit many of them left the city for safer refuge).
Ramadi is still being cleared of booby traps and insurgents even though it was "liberated" months ago.

[/size]

[size]
Ramadan being observed next month and the heat of the summer are both guaranteed to slow down military operations. Also, it remains to be seen if the Iraqi security forces are truly up to the challenge.
[/size]
Kurdish forces can only play a limited role in the campaign and would not be seen as liberators at all by the locals.
 
[size]
The composition of the liberating force is still a matter of debate. Many locals do not trust the Iraqi security forces.
Kurdish forces can only play a limited role in the campaign and would not be seen as liberators at all by the locals. The use of Shia militias by Baghdad to help retake the city would be a disaster. Using a large-scale US ground force to liberate the city would be equally bonkers. 
Do not underestimate the challenge a city the size of Mosul will be to liberate. With an operation this size, success is likely to be measured in months if not years - not days and weeks. 

Local attitudes

The success and speed of the operation will largely depend on the mood of the Sunni inhabitants. 
However terrible life under ISIL might be, the locals will need to see a credible alternative to the status quo before they openly support the Iraqi security forces. 
This will be easier said than done. 
Recent polling carried out by Iraqi polling firm IIACSS conducted sheds light on this. The results are both eye-opening and alarming. Some findings are:

[/size]

  • In Mosul, 74 percent of Sunni respondents say they do not want to be liberated by the Iraqi army on its own.
  • Of the 120 Sunni respondents in Mosul, 100 percent do not want to be liberated by Shiite militias or the Kurds.
  • Does this mean Iraqi Sunnis like ISIL? No. A poll conducted in January 2016 showed that 99 percent of Shiite and 95 percent of Sunnis across Iraq oppose ISIL.

[size]
These attitudes by Iraq's Sunni population probably explain why even though Fallujah has been surrounded for more than a year by Iraqi security forces there has not been a popular uprising by the Sunni inhabitants against ISIL.

[/size]

[size]
Until these larger political and sectarian divisions are addressed in Iraq, it really will not matter in the bigger picture who has de facto control over Mosul.

Not a fatal blow

If Mosul were to fall tomorrow it would be a blow - but not a fatal one - for ISIL. 
Even if ISIL is removed from Iraq, they will still have a base on which to fall back. The terror organisation's capital, training centres, arms depots, primary sources of revenue remain in Syria. Until there is a strategy to deal with ISIL in its centre of gravity in Syria the terror group will remain a threat to regional security. 
Of course, ISIL needs to be expelled, but simply removing the terror group will not solve many of Iraq's sectarian divisions - many of which were the reasons why ISIL was able to capture the city to begin with. 
Until the sectarian divisions inside Iraq are addressed, it is hard to see how the liberation of Mosul will make a significant difference or a lasting impact on the overall stability of the country. 
If sectarian divisions and political grievances are not addressed by Baghdad, then something else will eventually replace ISIL. If the recent evolution of terrorist groups in the region is any indication, whatever comes after ISIL will probably be just as bad, if not worse. 
Before we know it, in a few years, someone will have to liberate Mosul (or Ramadi or Fallujah) all over again. 
As General David Petraeus said in 2003, soon after the invasion of Iraq before he became a household name: "Tell me how this ends."
Luke Coffey is a research fellow specialising in transatlantic and Eurasian security at a Washington DC-based think-tank. He previously served as a special adviser to the British defence secretary and was a commissioned officer in the United States Army.
The views expressed in this article are the author's own and do not necessarily reflect Al Jazeera's editorial policy.[/size]

jedi17
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1877
Thanked : 463
Join date : 2013-02-20

Re: On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul

Post by jedi17 on Tue 30 Aug 2016, 5:09 pm

Two risks will drive decision-makers in Baghdad, Washington and Erbil to hold back from assaulting the city. 
The first is the risk of catastrophic failure; the bloody repulse of a hasty attack on the city, which could negatively affect Iraqi security force morale elsewhere and transfer the initiative back to ISIL. 
But a second, equally serious risk is that of catastrophic success; that ISIL control could "pop" surprisingly quickly, creating a chaotic scramble for power in Iraq's second city between the Iraqi government, the Kurds, local Sunni militias and ISIL diehards. 
If such an outcome can be avoided through the patient creation of a "day after" plan agreed upon by all the attacking forces, then the eviction of ISIL from Mosul might qualify as a "liberation" instead of just the commencement of a new chapter of fighting in that embattled city. 
Michael Knights is the Lafer Fellow at the Washington Institute for Near East Policy. He specialises in the politics and security of Iraq. He has worked in every Iraqi province and most of the country's hundred districts, including periods embedded with Iraq's security forces.

jedi17
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 1877
Thanked : 463
Join date : 2013-02-20

Re: On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul

Post by jedi17 on Tue 30 Aug 2016, 5:09 pm

in red....political BS

duck2000
Interacting Investor
Interacting Investor

Posts : 2444
Thanked : 917
Join date : 2012-12-21

Re: On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul

Post by duck2000 on Tue 30 Aug 2016, 6:12 pm

ide say he off base on entire thingy! LOL

Sponsored content

Re: On the ground with the peshmerga, preparing to retake Mosul

Post by Sponsored content Today at 2:13 am


    Current date/time is Tue 06 Dec 2016, 2:13 am