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Doctor Explains Why Hillary's 9/11 "Medical Episode" Is More Consistent With Parkinson's Than Pneumo

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wciappetta
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Doctor Explains Why Hillary's 9/11 "Medical Episode" Is More Consistent With Parkinson's Than Pneumo

Post by wciappetta on Fri 16 Sep 2016, 5:15 am

Doctor Explains Why Hillary's 9/11 "Medical Episode" Is More Consistent With Parkinson's Than Pneumonia


zerohedge.com |

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A few weeks back, Dr. Ted Noel, an anesthesiologist with 36 years of experience, gained notoriety by sharing his opinion on his website, Vidzette, that Hillary likely had Parkinson’s disease.
Now, Dr. Noel has posted a new video in which he explains how Hillary's behavior on 9/11 and the subsequent decisions made by her campaign staff and secret service detail are more consistent with Parkinson's disease than pneumonia.
Among other things, Noel points out that if Hillary actually was suffering from such a severe case of pneumonia that it forced her to literally collapse on a sidewalk, it's extremely unlikely that she could make a seemingly full recovery after only 90 minutes at Chelsea's apartment and feel well enough to great onlookers and snap a selfie with a child.  Per Noel, Hillary's recovery timing is more consistent with how long it would take her to ingest a dosage of Levodopa and wait for her Parkinson's symptoms to subside.  Noel also points out that sunglasses with dark blue lenses, like the ones Hillary wore this weekend despite the cloud cover, have been noted by doctors to help treat patients with major motion disorders such as Parkinson's disease.
With that preview, here is the full analysis:



And here is Noel's original video from August 29th:




http://www.zerohedge.com/news/2016-09-13/medical-doctor-explains-why-hillarys-911-medical-episode-looks-more-parkinsons-pneum


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Re: Doctor Explains Why Hillary's 9/11 "Medical Episode" Is More Consistent With Parkinson's Than Pneumo

Post by duck2000 on Fri 16 Sep 2016, 5:25 am

[size=49]What is Parkinson’s disease?[/size]

Parkinson’s disease (Parkinsonism) is marked by the presence of certain recognizable symptoms. These include uncontrollable shaking or tremor, lack of coordination, and speaking difficulties. However, symptoms vary and may worsen as the disease progresses.
The main symptoms of Parkinson’s include:


  • uncontrollable trembling and tremors

  • slowed movement (bradykinesia)

  • balance difficulties, and eventual problems standing up

  • stiffness in limbs


Many doctors who diagnose this brain disorder rely on the Hoehn and Yahr rating scale to classify the severity of symptoms. The scale is broken into five stages based on disease progression. The five stages help doctors evaluate how far the disease has advanced.

[size=49]Stage 1[/size]

Stage 1 is the mildest form of Parkinson’s. At this stage, there may be symptoms, but they’re not severe enough to interfere with daily tasks and overall lifestyle. In fact, the symptoms are so minimal at this stage that they’re often missed. But family and friends may notice changes in your posture, walk, or facial expressions.
A distinct symptom of stage 1 Parkinson’s is that tremors and other difficulties in movement are generally exclusive to one side of the body. Prescribed medications can work effectively to minimize and reduce symptoms at this stage.

[size=49]Stage 2[/size]

Stage 2 is considered a moderate form of Parkinson’s, and the symptoms are much more noticeable than those experienced in stage 1. Stiffness, tremors, and trembling may be more noticeable, and changes in facial expressions can occur.
While muscle stiffness prolongs task completion, stage 2 does not impair balance. Difficulties walking may develop or increase, and the person’s posture may start to change.
People at this stage feel symptoms on both sides of the body (though one side may only be minimally affected) and sometimes experience speech difficulties.
The majority of people with stage 2 Parkinson’s can still live alone, though they may find that some tasks take longer to complete. The progression from stage 1 to stage 2 can take months or even years. And there is no way to predict individual progression.

[size=49]Stage 3[/size]

Stage 3 is the middle stage in Parkinson’s, and it marks a major turning point in the progression of the disease. Many of the symptoms are the same as those in stage 2. However, you are now more likely to experience loss of balance and decreased reflexes. Your movements become slower overall. This is why falls become more common in stage 3.
Parkinson’s significantly affects daily tasks at this stage, but people are still able to complete them. Medication combined with occupational therapy may help decrease symptoms.

[size=49]Stage 4[/size]

Independence separates people with stage 3 Parkinson’s from those with stage 4. During stage 4, it’s possible to stand without assistance. However, movement may require a walker or other type of assistive device.
Many people are unable to live alone at this stage of Parkinson’s because of significant decreases in movement and reaction times. Living alone at stage 4 or later may make many daily tasks impossible, and can be extremely dangerous.

[size=49]Stage 5[/size]

Stage 5 is the most advanced and debilitating stage of Parkinson’s disease. Advanced stiffness in the legs can also cause freezing upon standing, making it impossible to stand or walk. People require wheelchairs, and are often unable to stand without falling. Around-the-clock assistance is required to prevent falls.
People at this stage may even experience hallucinations and delusions. Hallucinations occur when you see things that aren’t there. Delusions happen when you believe things that aren’t true, even when you have been presented with evidence that your belief is wrong. Side effects from medications at stage 5 can outweigh the benefits.
http://www.healthline.com/health/parkinsons/stages#Stage56

    Current date/time is Wed 07 Dec 2016, 8:02 pm