Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Iraq Dinar/News is a popular topic among many topics this board offers. You must log in to see and participate in our Dinar sections.

Position yourself for free after watching the video on eCommerce at www.nenosplace.ipronetwork.com

Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 7am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.
Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2017


Marines, looking to expand Twentynine Palms training grounds, airlift 1,100 desert tortoises

Share
avatar
Lobo
Moderator
Moderator

Posts : 26663
Thanked : 1324
Join date : 2013-01-12

Marines, looking to expand Twentynine Palms training grounds, airlift 1,100 desert tortoises

Post by Lobo on Wed 19 Apr 2017, 2:52 pm

Marines, looking to expand Twentynine Palms training grounds, airlift 1,100 desert tortoises

- use link for photo

Marines wait for a desert tortoise to move off the road at the U.S. Marine Corps' Air Ground Combat Center at Twentynine Palms, Calif. (Associated Press)

Jeanette Steele

More than 1,000 desert tortoises are taking a trip with the Marine Corps this month.
The military is using helicopters to relocate the tortoises to another part of the Mojave to make way for an expansion of its desert training grounds.
During the two-week-long process, the hubcap-sized tortoises are being loaded into plastic containers, which are then stacked and strapped to a helicopter.
Their new home will be swaths of federal land to the north and southeast of the Twentynine Palms base, Marine officials said. The areas were deemed far enough away that the tortoises wouldn’t migrate back to the original habitat.
The cost of the whole effort, including a 30-year monitoring program to ensure the health of the federally protected species, is $50 million.
The Marines at the Twentynine Palms base want to be able to practice large-scale exercises with live fire and combined-arms maneuvering.
The campaign goes back to 2008, when the Corps began studying how to do it without breaking environmental law.
The 2014 National Defense Authorization Act handed land formerly managed by the Bureau of Land Management to the Defense Department. Tortoises living on that land are now being moved.

In March 2016, the Center for Biological Diversity filed a notice of intent to sue, arguing that the federal government failed to fully examine how the move might harm the tortoises.
However, the move went ahead this month after the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service told the Marine Corps that its review wouldn’t be done before the spring window for the move, Marine Corps officials said.
It’s not the first time that the Corps has been in the tortoise-moving business.
In 2006, the Twentynine Palms base relocated 17 adult tortoises in order to build a training range. Marine officials say no tortoises died during three years of post-move monitoring.
This time, Marine Corps biologists will monitor tortoises intensely for the first five years. Then monitoring requirements will diminish over time until the 30-year obligation is met, officials said.
About 235 juveniles too small for relocation are being admitted to the base’s “head start facility,” where they will remain until they grow large enough to better survive on their own.
http://www.latimes.com/local/lanow/la-me-desert-tortoises-20170419-story.html

    Current date/time is Fri 20 Oct 2017, 3:45 am