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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Iraq is counting on the Gulf after America's refusal to participate in the reconstruction of liberat

    Rocky
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    Iraq is counting on the Gulf after America's refusal to participate in the reconstruction of liberat Empty Iraq is counting on the Gulf after America's refusal to participate in the reconstruction of liberat

    Post by Rocky Tue 02 Jan 2018, 1:41 am

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    Iraq is counting on the Gulf after America's refusal to participate in the reconstruction of liberated areas


     Translation / Hamid Ahmed 

    For nearly two and a half miles along the western bank of the Euphrates River from the city of Mosul, almost no single building is safe from damage. The streets of the narrow alleys of the old city of Mosul are a scene of collapsed buildings of broken concrete and iron blocks.
    Within each area of ​​one acre or the equivalent of every 4,000 square meters of the Old City, there are rubble weighing up to 3,000 tons, often with explosives and unexploded ordnance. 
    The rubble removal process may take years, and this is only one corner of the destruction area. The Iraqi army and the US-led international coalition have succeeded in uprooting an oppressive organization across the country, but the price of victory has been huge and can not be appreciated. 
    Three years of war destroyed most of northern and western Iraq. Baghdad estimates it needs nearly $ 100 billion to conduct a comprehensive reconstruction in the country, but local officials in Mosul say the amount is enough to qualify their city.
    No one is willing to pay part of this sum so far. The Trump administration has told the Iraqis it will not contribute to the financing of any overall reconstruction that may take place in the country. Iraq hopes that Arab and Gulf countries will take up the task and Iran may also have a role to play. 
    For its part, the United Nations is in the process of rehabilitating and rehabilitating some infrastructure in more than 20 villages and cities around Iraq, but its funding covers only the fraction of its overall needs. 
    As a result, most of the reconstruction operations have come from people using their own savings to save their homes and shops.
    Mosul was the most liberated area of ​​Iraq. The United Nations estimates there are more than 40,000 homes in Mosul that need to be rehabilitated or rehabilitated with more than 600,000 people from Mosul unable to return to the city, which once housed 2 million people. 
    "The responsibility for spending on the reconstruction effort lies with the international community, and if Mosul is not reconstructed, this will result in the resurgence of terrorism," Mosul city director and Nineveh reconstruction adviser Abdul Sattar al-Habbo told the Associated Press. 
    The ancient city of Mosul has paid the heaviest price of the destruction as it was the last Dahesh station before its defeat. The streets of the old city are filled with rubble from the demolished houses. The few tall buildings of six or seven floors are left with only concrete structures, and office buildings and shopping centers have been turned into piles of tiles.
    More than 850 years old, the mosque of al-Nouri, which was set up by armed men, is only the base of its famous Hadba shrine. 
    In the southern end of the Old City, the historic market with stone arched arches was burned and destroyed. Spices, house supplies and clothing were sold there. At the northern end outside the Old City, some buildings were destroyed and turned into piles of dust and stones within a large medical complex that also houses the Faculty of Medicine And the Republic Hospital. 
    All five bridges connecting the sides of the Tigris River in the city were destroyed by aerial bombardment, forcing all residents of Mosul to rely on one temporary floating crossing linking the western side to the eastern side of the city.
    Military experts estimate the extent of the damage to the cities of Mosul and Raqqa as much as the destruction of Vietnam's Ho city nearly a generation ago in 1968. Stephen Wood, a senior analyst at Digital Globe, said: "All I can say is that the picture reminds me of what happened to the German city of Dresden or pictures I saw about the Second World War." 
    Along the beaten old city roads, a group of people have begun reconstruction efforts. Ammar Ismail, a man who sold his wife's gold to repaint his shop and did not ask himself to apply to the government to help him. 
    "There is a commitment on the part of the United States and other Western countries to reconstruct Mosul," Ismail said. "We fought on behalf of the whole world, and now it is their turn to stand next to Mosul."
    As well as the magnitude of the damage that occurred in Mosul, there is also the destruction of the city of Ramadi, the center of Anbar province. According to officials from the provincial council, two years after it was liberated from a pre-emptive organization, 70 percent of the city's buildings remain damaged or destroyed. 
    According to the United Nations Human Settlements Program, approximately 8,300 houses, or about a third of Ramadi's homes, are destroyed or severely damaged. All five Ramadi bridges over the Euphrates River have been damaged, three of which are now undergoing repairs. Three-quarters of schools are still unusable. 
    The Anbar provincial council is now meeting in a small building down the road at the wreckage of a former building whose headquarters are the president. Most of Ramadi's government buildings were destroyed by armed militants.
    "We have not received a single dollar of reconstruction money from Baghdad," said Ahmed Shaker, a member of the Anbar provincial council, "When we ask the government for reconstruction funds, they tell us, 'Help yourselves, go and ask your friends in the Gulf.'

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