Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Join the forum, it's quick and easy

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.
Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars

rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM


Posts : 229765
Join date : 2012-12-21

Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars Empty Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars

Post by rocky Wed 13 Mar 2019, 7:08 am

Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars AAapfVx
Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars




SOPAN DEB
3 hrs ago
















  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUHe2a
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUHgyp
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUGMDO


Lori Loughlin et al. posing for the camera: Prosecutors say Ms. Loughlin spent $500,000 in bribes and sham donations on behalf of her two daughters: Olivia Jade Giannulli, left, and Isabella Rose Giannulli.

Previous Slide

Next Slide

Full screen

1/3 SLIDES ©️ Chris Pizzello/Invision, via Associated Press


Prosecutors say Ms. Loughlin spent $500,000 in bribes and sham donations on behalf of her two daughters: Olivia Jade Giannulli, left, and Isabella Rose Giannulli.

2/3 SLIDES ©️ Alex Gallardo/Associated Press


Ms. Huffman’s husband, the actor William H. Macy, arriving Tuesday at the federal courthouse in Los Angeles. He was not charged, though his wife’s indictment alleges that he consented to the cheating scheme.

3/3 SLIDES ©️ The Associated Press


FILE - In this Sept. 17, 2018 file photo, Felicity Huffman, left, and William H. Macy arrive at the 70th Primetime Emmy Awards in Los Angeles. Huffman and Lori Loughlin were charged along with nearly 50 other people Tuesday, March 12, 2019, in a scheme in which wealthy parents bribed college coaches and insiders at testing centers to help get their children into some of the most elite schools in the country, federal prosecutors said. Court papers said a cooperating witness met with Huffman and Macy, at their Los Angeles home and explained the scam to them. The cooperator told investigators that Huffman and her spouse "agreed to the plan." (Photo by Jordan Strauss/Invision/AP, File)

3/3 SLIDES

A year ago, the feel-good Hollywood couple Felicity Huffman and William H. Macy made a $15,000 donation to the Key Worldwide Foundation. A bookkeeper for the charity wrote back saying that the money would help “provide educational and self-enrichment programs to disadvantaged youth.”

But the foundation, prosecutors said on Tuesday, was little more than a conduit for a massive SAT-fixing and college admissions-rigging scheme. And the youth helped by the payment was far from disadvantaged: She was the couple’s elder daughter.



Sign Up For the Morning Briefing Newsletter

The Justice Department unsealed indictments Tuesday accusing admissions advisers, coaches and school officials of offering wealthy families one of two back doors into the colleges of their choice.

[Fifty people were charged in the widespread scam to get undeserving students into colleges.]

One method involved bribing university officials to pass off applicants as athletic recruits even if they weren’t; the other used brazen cheating on standardized exams. And both schemes had Hollywood stars playing a role.

Ms. Huffman’s career in Hollywood stretches back to the 1970s. Her performance as Bree, the transgender main character in “Transamerica,” earned her an Oscar nomination in 2006. But much of her work has been in television. She is best known for roles including Lynette Scavo in “Desperate Housewives” and Dana Whitaker in the Aaron Sorkin show “Sports Night” as well as for several roles in the ABC show “American Crime.” Most recently, Ms. Huffman, 56, played Special Agent Clara Dillard in Epix’s “Get Shorty.”

In 1997, she married Mr. Macy, the same year he was nominated for an Oscar, after he starred in “Fargo.” Mr. Macy, 68, a veteran of many movies, currently plays Frank Gallagher, the head of the dysfunctional family in the Showtime comedy series “Shameless.” They have two daughters: The elder was born in 2000, and the younger two years later.

According to the authorities, William Singer, the head of a college preparatory business and the founder of the charity, met with Ms. Huffman and Mr. Macy in their Los Angeles home and explained how he could help them. Mr. Singer, who has pleaded guilty and is cooperating with investigators — he is identified as “cooperating witness 1” in the indictments — said he could arrange for their daughter’s SAT proctor to secretly correct her wrong answers and boost her score. “CW-1 has advised investigators that Huffman and her spouse agreed to the plan,” the indictment said.

Following Mr. Singer’s instructions, Ms. Huffman had her daughter seek permission to get extra time on the SAT, an option available to students with learning disabilities or other needs. Once the girl received the permission, Mr. Singer instructed Ms. Huffman to have her daughter take the test in December 2017 with a proctor who was in on the scheme. (He is cooperating witness No. 2.)

At first, when it appeared that a different proctor from her daughter’s own high school would be involved, Ms. Huffman emailed Mr. Singer: “Ruh Ro!” They soon got the plan back on track by using another test site where, according to the indictment, the crooked proctor would be present.

Less than two months ago, Parade published an interview with Mr. Macy, in which he spoke of his older daughter’s college search. “We’re right now in the thick of college application time, which is so stressful,” he said. “I am voting that once she gets accepted, she maybe takes a year off.”

[Here’s a list of those charged in the scandal.]

However stressful the process was, prosecutors believe the cheating helped his daughter’s cause.

“Ultimately, Huffman’s daughter received a score of 1420 on the SAT, an improvement of approximately 400 points over her PSAT, taken without CW-2 one year earlier,” said the indictment, referring to the Preliminary SAT.

It was unclear if their daughter has been admitted to any colleges, or if she even knew, before Tuesday, about any cheating on her behalf.

The indictment also includes excerpts from a conversation in which Mr. Macy, Ms. Huffman and Mr. Singer discussed repeating the process for the younger daughter, but only after she took the SAT on her own to see how well she would do. If they went through with the plan, Mr. Singer explained, the second score could only go up so much or else they would raise suspicions.

Ultimately, Ms. Huffman and Mr. Macy decided not to proceed with the plan for their younger daughter, the indictment said.

Ms. Huffman was charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud. But Mr. Macy, who is referred to in the indictment as her spouse but not by name, was not charged. Neither the indictment nor prosecutors’ statements explained why, though it is possible that prosecutors believed they did not have enough evidence to charge him. In the emails and recorded telephone conversations quoted in the indictment, Mr. Macy is a direct participant only in conversations regarding the aborted plan, not the one that was carried to fruition and resulted in the $15,000 payment.

A representative for the couple did not respond to a request for comment. Ms. Huffman was arrested on Tuesday morning in Los Angeles, according to the United States Attorney’s Office in Boston, which is spearheading the prosecution. She was released after posting a $250,000 bond after a court appearance Tuesday, The Associated Press reported.

Among Ms. Huffman’s most recent projects is “When They See Us,” a Netflix series due out this year about the wrongful convictions in the Central Park jogger case, in which she plays Linda Fairstein, one of the prosecutors. Netflix declined to comment.

Another actress who was charged, Lori Loughlin, was making arrangements to surrender. Ms. Loughlin, 54, is best known for her role as Aunt Becky in the 1990s sitcom “Full House,” a role she reprised recently in a reboot, “Fuller House,” which streamed on Netflix.

Her husband, Mossimo Giannulli, also was charged. Mr. Giannulli founded the Mossimo fashion brand in 1986. The company sells clothing and accessories around the world, including in Australia, Mexico, Japan and India. It had a partnership with Target that ended in 2017.

Their daughter Olivia Jade Giannulli, a [url=https://www.nytimes.com/2019/03/12/style/olivia-jade-giannulli-college-admissions-scandal.html?action=click&module=Top stories&pgtype=Homepage]budding social media influencer[/url] with close to two million YouTube subscribers and 1.3 million Instagram followers, posted two paid advertisements on Instagram that highlighted her identity as a student shortly after having been admitted to the University of Southern California. According to the indictments, she had a lot of help getting in.

[Read more about Olivia Giannulli, now a college student.]

Her parents are accused of paying $500,000 to have Olivia and her sister classified as crew recruits for U.S.C. despite never having participated in the sport, according to prosecutors. The indictment says $100,000 was in the form of two $50,000 bribes to Donna Heinel, a senior associate athletic director at U.S.C., who then marked the girls as potential members of the crew team. Heinel also was indicted.

The couple sent the other $400,000 to the foundation — a payment of $200,000 after each daughter received her U.S.C. admission letter.

A representative for Ms. Loughlin declined to comment.

It was not clear whether either girl knew about any scheme to help them, or what, if anything, U.S.C. would do with them now.

In a statement, the school said: “We are aware of the ongoing wide-ranging criminal investigation involving universities nationwide, including U.S.C. U.S.C. has not been accused of any wrongdoing and will continue to cooperate fully with the government’s investigation.”



http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/felicity-huffman-and-lori-loughlin-how-college-admission-scandal-ensnared-stars/ar-BBUHv2k?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=U453DHP
rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM


Posts : 229765
Join date : 2012-12-21

Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars Empty 8 colleges were named in the massive college-admissions scandal. Here's how they're responding.

Post by rocky Wed 13 Mar 2019, 7:12 am

8 colleges were named in the massive college-admissions scandal. Here's how they're responding.





  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUGSD6
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUGQhT
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUGZWb
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUGX32Sun Basket
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars E151e5
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars E151e5
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars E151e5
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars E151e5
  • Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars E151e5


Slide 1 of 9: Dozens of people, including several successful actors and prominent businesspeople, have been indicted in a college-admissions scheme, according to court documents unsealed Tuesday. Authorities said parents spent an average of between $250,000 and $400,000 per student and some facilitated their children being recruited as Division 1 athletes regardless of their athletic abilities. Universities named in court documents include Georgetown University, the University of Southern California, Stanford University, the University of Texas at Austin, Yale University, Wake Forest University, and the University of California, Los Angeles. Dozens of people were indicted on charges related to paying bribes of up to $6.5 million to get their children into elite universities, federal prosecutors revealed Tuesday. Authorities said parents spent an average of between $250,000 and $400,000 per student and some facilitated their children being recruited as Division 1 athletes, regardless of their athletic abilities. Many of the students involved in the bribes didn't know about the deals, according to investigators. The schools have so far denied any knowledge of the schemes. The universities named in unsealed court documents include Georgetown University, the University of Southern California, Stanford University, the University of Texas at Austin, Yale University, Wake Forest University, and the University of California, Los Angeles. Here's how each school is responding to the investigation's findings:




1/9 SLIDES ©️ Al Seib / Los Angeles Times via Getty Images



  • Dozens of people, including several successful actors and prominent businesspeople, have been indicted in a college-admissions scheme, according to court documents unsealed Tuesday.
  • Authorities said parents spent an average of between $250,000 and $400,000 per student and some facilitated their children being recruited as Division 1 athletes regardless of their athletic abilities.
  • Universities named in court documents include Georgetown University, the University of Southern California, Stanford University, the University of Texas at Austin, Yale University, Wake Forest University, and the University of California, Los Angeles.

Dozens of people were indicted on charges related to paying bribes of up to $6.5 million to get their children into elite universities, federal prosecutors revealed Tuesday.
Authorities said parents spent an average of between $250,000 and $400,000 per student and some facilitated their children being recruited as Division 1 athletes, regardless of their athletic abilities.
Many of the students involved in the bribes didn't know about the deals, according to investigators. The schools have so far denied any knowledge of the schemes.
The universities named in unsealed court documents include Georgetown University, the University of Southern California, Stanford University, the University of Texas at Austin, Yale University, Wake Forest University, and the University of California, Los Angeles.
Here's how each school is responding to the investigation's findings:

 http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/8-colleges-were-named-in-the-massive-college-admissions-scandal-heres-how-theyre-responding/ss-BBUGQij?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=U453DHP
rocky
rocky
NNP TEAM
NNP TEAM


Posts : 229765
Join date : 2012-12-21

Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars Empty Some accused in the alleged cheating scandal paid enough in bribes for a full college education

Post by rocky Wed 13 Mar 2019, 7:17 am

Some accused in the alleged cheating scandal paid enough in bribes for a full college education




By Madeline Holcombe, CNN
3 hrs ago




















Some of the 33 parents charged Tuesday with cheating to get their children into prestigious schools may have paid enough in bribes to cover the full cost of a college education and then some.


Two SAT/ACT administrators, an exam proctor, nine coaches at elite schools, a college administrator and 33 parents -- a total of 50 people -- are accused of participating in a scheme that involved cheating on standardized tests and bribing college coaches and others to admit students as athletes regardless of their abilities, prosecutors revealed in a federal indictment. The scandal is being called the largest college admissions scam ever prosecuted.

FBI Special Agent Joseph Bonavolonta said some parents spent anywhere from $200,000 to $6.5 million to guarantee admissions for their children.

Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUI0Ls©️ Getty Images Lori Loughlin, William Singer and Felicity Huffman The relatives of one applicant paid a California business owner $1.2 million to falsely describe the individual as the co-captain of a well-known soccer California soccer team, although the applicant did not play competitive soccer, prosecutors said.

The average annual cost of tuition and fees at a private, four-year college is $29,478, according to the most recent report from the US Department of Education's National Center for Education Statistics.

"This case is about the widening corruption of elite college admissions through the steady application of wealth combined with fraud," Andrew Lelling, the US attorney for Massachusetts, said. "There can be no separate college admission system for the wealthy, and I'll add that there will not be a separate criminal justice system either."

The parents alleged to have been involved include CEOs, a fashion designer, the chairman of a global law firm and actors including Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin, Lelling said.

Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars BBUGSD6

Photo gallery by Business Insider

He added, "For every student admitted through fraud, an honest, genuinely talented student was rejected."



How the money was spent




Much of the indictment revolves around William Rick Singer, the founder of a for-profit college counseling and preparation business known as The Key.

"OK, so, who we are ... what we do is we help the wealthiest families in the US get their kids into school," Singer told one parent, according to prosecutors.

Lelling explained the two main avenues for carrying out the scheme.

"I'll speak more broadly, there were essentially two kinds of fraud that Singer was selling," Lelling said of the accusations that span from 2011 to 2019. "One was to cheat on the SAT or ACT, and the other was to use his connections with Division I coaches and use bribes to get these parents' kids into school with fake athletic credentials."

For example, prosecutors said Singer and his co-conspirators used stock photos of a person playing a sport and then put the face of a student onto that image via Photoshop.

Singer was paid roughly $25 million by parents to help their children get in to schools, the US attorney said.

Singer pleaded guilty on Tuesday to racketeering conspiracy, money laundering conspiracy, conspiracy to defraud the United States and obstruction of justice, prosecutors said.



Actresses are allegedly on tape discussing scheme




Best known for her role on TV's "Desperate Housewives," Huffman is accused of paying $15,000 to Singer's fake charity, the Key Worldwide Foundation, to facilitate cheating for her daughter on the SATs, the complaint says.

Her daughter received a 1420 on her test, which was 400 points higher than a PSAT taken a year earlier without the same administrator, the complaint states.

Huffman also discussed the scheme in a recorded phone call with a cooperating witness, the complaint says.

Huffman has been charged with felony conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud, according to court paperwork filed Monday in federal court in Massachusetts. She was arrested without incident at her home, the FBI said.

She appeared Tuesday in a federal court in Los Angeles where a judge set bond for her at $250,000 and federal agents took her passport.

Her next court date has been set for March 29 in Boston.

Loughlin, who played Aunt Becky on "Full House," is facing the same felony charge. Her husband, fashion designer Mossimo Giannulli, was also charged with conspiracy to commit mail fraud and honest services mail fraud.

Giannulli and Loughlin allegedly agreed to pay bribes totaling $500,000 in exchange for having their two daughters designated as recruits to the USC crew team, even though they did not participate in crew, the complaint said.

The money was given to Singer's fake charity, and in a recorded phone call Singer clarified that the money was actually for getting their daughters into USC crew, according to the complaint.

Giannulli appeared in court Tuesday, where a magistrate judge set a $1 million bond and ordered him to surrender his passport.

Even though she was not present in court, prosecutors and Loughlin's attorneys agreed on similar terms as well as permission for her to travel to Vancouver and back for work.

CNN has contacted Iconix Brand Group, which owns Giannulli's namesake fashion company, Mossimo.

CNN is also working to get comment from the actresses' representatives.



The colleges involved




Coaches from Yale, Stanford, the University of Southern California, Wake Forest and Georgetown, among others, are implicated in the case. The extensive case involved arrests in six states across the country.

"The Department of Justice believes that Yale has been the victim of a crime perpetrated by a former coach who no longer works at the university," the university said in a statement sent out to the school. "The corrupt behavior alleged by the Department of Justice is an affront to our university's deeply held values of inclusion and fairness."



Georgetown told students that the coach arrested in their case, "has not coached our tennis team since December 2017, when he was placed on leave after the Office of Undergraduate Admissions identified irregularities in his recruitment practices and the University initiated an internal investigation."

The University of Southern California said it is reviewing its application process.



What happens to the students?




It was not an accident that no students were charged on Tuesday, said Lelling, the US attorney. The parents and other defendants were "the prime movers of this fraud," he said. He said students may face charges down the road.



http://www.msn.com/en-us/news/crime/some-accused-in-the-alleged-cheating-scandal-paid-enough-in-bribes-for-a-full-college-education/ar-BBUI38d?li=BBnb7Kz&ocid=U453DHP

Sponsored content


Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars Empty Re: Felicity Huffman and Lori Loughlin: How College Admission Scandal Ensnared Stars

Post by Sponsored content


    Current date/time is Sat 26 Nov 2022, 7:04 am