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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Israel brings Moscow and Washington together in a new alliance that defines the future of the region

    Rocky
    Rocky
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    Israel brings Moscow and Washington together in a new alliance that defines the future of the region Empty Israel brings Moscow and Washington together in a new alliance that defines the future of the region

    Post by Rocky Wed 12 Jun 2019, 3:44 am


    [size=32]Israel brings Moscow and Washington together in a new alliance that defines the future of the region


    - 6 Hours Ago
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    Israel brings Moscow and Washington together in a new alliance that defines the future of the region %D8%A7%D9%8A%D8%B1%D8%A7%D9%86-2-300x207
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    Israel is striving to bring Russia and the United States closer together in Syria and unify the front, creating a new alliance in the Middle East, leading the next stage and tightening the screws on Iran. However, this new situation may put the Syrian regime in a difficult position in terms of the need to choose to stand with the party that will end the battle and will determine the future of the region.
    MOSCOW - During the Valdai Dialogue Conference on the Middle East, hosted by Russia in 2018, the media reported a picture of Iranian Foreign Minister Javad Zarif sitting with his Russian counterpart Sergei Lavrov on white leather seats. "The positions of Iran and Russia on many regional issues are very close," Zarif said.
    However, the picture was not convincing to many who regard the Iran-Russia alliance as fragile, and the end of disintegration. Just as this alliance has strengthened its ties with Syria, its end, according to observers, will also be in Syria. Russian and Iranian foreign policy objectives converge or vary by topic and stage.
    Today, talk of divergence, at least in Syria, has become stronger than the alliance's rhetoric, despite Russian efforts to downplay the importance of this trend, which has been evident in the Israeli media and research centers, which recently intensified a new alliance in the Middle East Between Russia, Israel and the United States.
    Israel, Russia and the United States agree that Iran's ambitions in Syria and the road to the Mediterranean it seeks are a strategic threat
    One of the missionaries of the alliance, military analyst Zvi Bar'el, who wrote in the Israeli newspaper Haaretz, said that "this alliance is the one who will write the end of the crisis in Syria." Daniel Bi-Sabira, a researcher at the Institute for National Security Studies in Tel Aviv, emphasized the same idea, noting in a recent report to Haaretz that the recent meeting between national security advisers in the United States, Russia and Israel discussed the tools and the price of removing the Iranian army from Syria and the cost of bringing Russia into the anti-Iranian camp.
    Israel, Russia and the United States agreed to hold a summit of national security advisers in Israel this month to discuss the Iranian issue. According to unconfirmed sources, Russia expects the United States to recognize Assad's regime and lift sanctions. In return, Russia will push Iran out of Syria.
    He said that such a meeting, even if it did not produce immediate tangible results, would send a message to Iran and the region that it would be the Russian-American-Israeli axis that would shape New Middle East Roadmap.
    The Importance of Russian Role 
    Israeli coverage has focused on the importance of the Russian role and Israeli-Russian relations, which can create, along with Israeli-US relations, a balance that Israel needs in the region.

    For US policymakers, the competition of major powers with Russia (and China) is a key element of US national security strategy and defense strategy.
    The study, prepared by a number of Israeli national security experts, says Israelis know Washington's strategic interests and the need to maintain a US-led international order, but are forced to engage Russia. An arrangement that Israel views through the lens of the threat posed by Iran in Syria. The frustration of Iran's plans in Syria is in the best interest of Israel.
    The study concludes that in the end, Israel must strategically and tactically deal with a new external force on its borders in an unimaginable way for Americans, where Russia enjoys good protection from the friendly and stable neighbors and neighbors. Without a dedicated and regular exchange of Russian affairs between the two allies, misconceptions and misunderstandings may increase.
    The importance of this study is that it is a paper from a collection of papers and research prepared by Israeli experts for discussion at the Herzliya Conference, the most important Israeli security conference, to be held from June 30 to July 2. This conference is called the Strategic Mind of Israel, and is followed by various officials in the world as a measure and indicator of what the region can witness.
    As in previous years, Iran will be strongly present at the Herzliya Conference. Last year's conference discussed the US strategy to confront Iran under Donald Trump, and the strategy for cooperation with Russia will be the focus of this year's conference. The Israelis are betting on the rifts in the Russian-Iranian relationship in Syria, which have been reflected by several recent domestic clashes between pro-Iranian militias and Russian-backed militias.
    Zvi Bar'el comments on these clashes, pointing out that they appear to be local incidents, but that is different on a larger scale as Russia trains local militias and armors them through their own companies. The fighters wear uniforms of the Russian army and use the country's weapons. The Israeli analyst says that Russia gave the green light to the Syrian regime forces to shoot at officers and soldiers loyal to Iran. Russian officers also command some units of the Syrian army.
    In the midst of that, Russia has dealt two painful blows to Iran. Was the first when Russia rejected an Iranian request for the S-400 missile defense system. The second was Russia's cooperation with Israel by disrupting the S-300 missile defense system in conjunction with every Israeli attack on Syria.
    When Trump spoke of wanting to negotiate with Iran without preconditions, Iran refused to do so while Russia remained silent. When Iran announced its decision to reduce the extent of its commitment to the nuclear agreement announced in a statement that it "understands" Iran's position, but a few days later Vladimir Putin advised Iran to stay in the nuclear agreement, but went even further when he said, "Russia is not a fire brigade, Able to save everything, especially not entirely based on our will. "
    For Iran, these statements are a message that Russia will not stand by its side if attacked by the United States or Israel. I also understood that Russia has an interest in keeping Iran isolated.
    It seems clear that Mr Putin's shift has angered officials in Tehran. "Russia has stabbed Iran in its back with regard to Syria," Iran's former ambassador to the United Nations, Ali Khorram, wrote in the daily Arman.
    A complex history 
    Russia and Iran have a complex history of conflict that makes them far from being natural allies. For centuries, neighboring Russia and the Persian empires were competing parties. They fought a series of wars between the 17th and 19th centuries, forcing Iran to give up territory to Russia in what became today the countries of Georgia, Armenia and Azerbaijan, along with other properties in the Caucasus and Central Asia.

    Russia's occupation of Iran during the Second World War - and its refusal to leave afterwards - led to the first crisis in the then nascent UN Security Council. The Iranian monarchy feared the communist regime to the extent that it allowed the CIA to build a large wiretapping site along the border. After the 1979 revolution, the newly established Islamic Republic condemned its "atheist" neighbor.
    During the Iran-Iraq war, the Soviet Union armed Iraq and advised him. Moscow has replaced the hostility of the Iranians as much as Washington. After the collapse of the Soviet Union in 1991, relations narrowed and for self-interest, weak Russia built a commercial nuclear reactor in the southwestern port city of Bushehr.
    Dimitri Tarnin, director of the Carnegie Center in Moscow, notes that relations between Russia and Iran are relatively weak and unbalanced; economic relations are weak and ineffectual, as well as mutual mistrust.
    "The most that Moscow and Tehran can think of is a pragmatic relationship based on the interests of the two countries, as determined by their leaders," he said. "Both countries' weight and their international communications network vary greatly, creating a clear inconsistency.
    Assad's position 
    at the beginning of the alliance The advanced Russian artillery in Syria covered the cracks in the Russian-Iranian alliance in Syria. But as the situation progressed and the Assad regime, with Russian and Iranian support, restored a large part of the territory, The differences have begun to surface and are rising with the talk of the reconstruction of Syria and the post-war period.

    Russia does not intend to return Syria to Assad's control simply; it sees the country as a pressure force that strengthens its hold on the Middle East. This will serve to build ties with Saudi Arabia and long-term survival in the Middle East, establish an economic alliance with Egypt by providing military aid, and eliminate American and European sanctions, thereby strengthening its position in the world.
    The Russian expert on Middle Eastern affairs, Elena Sobonina, believes that Russia wants the Syrian government to control as much as possible. "Russia has an interest in getting Iran out of Syria and weakening it without causing it to collapse because it could lose Assad's regime, which it considers a key card," said Sami Nader, head of the Mashreq Center for Strategic Studies in Beirut. It wants to keep Iran under its control and control. "
    But these ambitions are not compatible with Iran's desire; Tehran sees Syria as a strategic location that maintains its influence in Lebanon, and a regional station no less important than Iraq to remain an influential player in the region. Syria also opens the way to the Mediterranean Sea in front of Iran and completes its alliances with Iraq and Turkey.
    Israel, the United States and Russia see this as a strategic threat. Here comes a big question that concerns not only the Iranian position, but also the attitude of the Syrian regime, which owes both Moscow and Tehran, its persistence and the situation reached by the equation after eight years of war.
    Zevi Bar'el is exploring the chances of the Syrian regime, pointing out that the option of Russia removing the Iranian forces from Syria is still "unrealistic." Russia has also failed to fulfill its promise to keep Iranian forces more than 80 kilometers from Israel's border in the Golan Heights, and there is uncertainty about whether it can make Iran withdraw at this stage.
    The journalist Barak Ravid said on Channel 13 that Israel offered Israel to persuade Iran to withdraw from Syria in exchange for the United States to lift sanctions. But Israel rejected the proposal.
    Bar'el points to another hypothesis: pressure on Assad to remove the Iranian forces from Syria, because he remains the party he called. Iran will find it difficult to stay there if it is not welcomed. On the other hand, the American side may recognize the Assad regime, which Israel would then not attack Syria after the departure of Iranian forces. It may also receive an obligation from countries in the region to participate in financing the reconstruction of the country, as well as to enjoy Russian strategic support. The value of these promises is greater than Iran can offer Syria.
    But Assad's problem lies in the fact that he will have to explain to Iran why she is leaving and that Russia will stay if he agrees to expel Iranian troops. He will also find himself dependent on the United States, Israel and Russia, whose interest in Syria is not limited to one person. In other words, these parties do not care about the fate of Assad in the end.
    On the other hand, Iran has supported Assad since the beginning, and gave him $ 8 billion in aid. Iran was on Assad's side long before the war began. It is still too early to talk about a clear position on the part of Assad or Iran and Russia, especially since the battle of Idlib is open, and Turkey is another influential actor whose relationship is divided between Washington and Moscow.
    However, in the end all the papers meet at a common point, and at some point they will have to determine their direction and leave one open door. If the beginning is to close the page of an advocacy organization, experts expect the next page to be Iran's militia page.
    The Arabs




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