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Iran's ballistic missiles under US radar

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Iran's ballistic missiles under US radar Empty Iran's ballistic missiles under US radar

Post by rocky on Fri 06 Dec 2019, 2:38 am



Iran's ballistic missiles under US radar





Intelligence reports: Iran secretly transferred missiles to Iraq


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Thursday 5 December 2019 20:37








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[size=13]Intelligence reports: Iran secretly transferred missiles to Iraq




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[/size]
an President Hassan Rouhani watches military parade in Tehran (Reuters)



Amid continuing tensions in the Middle East, US military and intelligence officials have revealed that Iran is secretly transferring its missiles to Iraq. This came as the United States refocused its military presence in the Middle East following attacks on its interests, such as recent attacks on oil tankers and Aramco fields, as well as Iranian efforts to increase tension and chaos in the region. The missiles pose a threat to America's allies.
The statements by US military officials are accompanied by a series of unrest in Iran, as well as violent protests by Iraqis against Iranian influence in their country.
The Iraqis "don't want the Iranians to lead them," said Elisa Slotkin, a Michigan Democrat and member of the House Armed Services Committee, in an interview with The New York Times. "But, unfortunately, because of the chaos and confusion in the Iraqi central government, Iran is benefiting from popular unrest." Iraqi officials have yet to comment on remarks by US intelligence officials.
On Wednesday, a letter was issued from the ambassadors of Britain, France and Germany urging UN Secretary-General Antonio Guterres to inform the Security Council in his next report that Iran's missile program "does not conform" to the UN nuclear deal reached between Iran and the major powers.
Iranian Foreign Minister Mohammad Javad Zarif tweeted: "The latest message from the UN Secretary-General on missiles is a miserable lie that cannot be covered up inefficiently in meeting the minimum commitments of the JCPOA." He urged Britain, France and Germany not to bow to "American bullying." The message emerged at a time of intense debate between Iran and the West, when Tehran gradually reneged on its obligations under the deal in response to Washington's withdrawal from the agreement last year, and Washington's resort to re-impose economic sanctions on Tehran.
Britain, France and Germany have sought to salvage the deal, in which Iran has vowed to curb its disputed uranium enrichment program in exchange for sanctions easing. However, Tehran criticized the three European powers for failing to protect the Iranian economy from US sanctions.
The United States, along with its Arab allies, sees Tehran's ballistic missile program as a threat to the security and stability of the Middle East, while the Iranians argue that the development of missile programs adheres only to defensive standards.
US officials have said that Iran is behind the attacks in the Middle East, and that the presence of missiles within the borders of countries allied to the Iranian regime, gives him the advantage of deterrence in any future war.
The New York Times says that US intelligence officials did not disclose the nature of Iranian missiles inside the Iraqi border, but they confirmed their existence.
Iran gradually gained control of several elements in Iraq, integrating itself into the country's infrastructure. "People are not paying enough attention to the fact that Iran has ballistic missiles placed last year in Iraq, but this calls for predicting violence in the region," said Slotkin, who recently visited Baghdad.
In a public report released last month, the US Defense Intelligence Agency said Iranian ballistic missiles were "an essential component of its strategic deterrence."
Apart from ongoing international sanctions, Iran continued to invest in the development of ballistic cruise missiles. Iran relies on its camouflage strategy on its military efforts to mislead its adversaries, thus keeping itself "away from radar." During the strike on Saudi oil installations last September, the sources revealed that the missiles were fired from Iran, but chose a long way by flying around the Gulf, passing through Iraq, to ​​reach its targets, in order to raise doubts about the source of the attack. Officials say the "shadow war" continues, and the threat is growing.

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