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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    An Iraqi plan worth 40 billion dollars to produce nuclear energy and solve the electricity crisis

    Rocky
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    An Iraqi plan worth 40 billion dollars to produce nuclear energy and solve the electricity crisis Empty An Iraqi plan worth 40 billion dollars to produce nuclear energy and solve the electricity crisis

    Post by Rocky Tue Jun 08, 2021 9:22 am

    [size=47]An Iraqi plan worth 40 billion dollars to produce nuclear energy and solve the electricity crisis


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    Long neglect affected electricity in Iraq (Getty)
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    Develop [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] plan worth $ 40 billion nuclear power plant, where the state oil - hungry energy is seeking to end the interruption of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] large - scale , which triggered social unrest, according to a report published by "Bloomberg" American.
    The second OPEC oil producer, already suffering from a lack of capacity and insufficient investment in old plants, needs to meet an expected 50 percent jump in demand by the end of the decade.

    Years of neglect combined with last year's slump in crude oil prices deprived the state of funds to maintain and expand the electricity system. The resulting outages sparked protests that threatened to bring down the government.
    "To meet the challenge, the country plans to build eight atomic reactors capable of producing about 11 gigawatts," said Kamal Hussein Latif, head of Iraq's Radioactive Resources Regulatory Authority. He explained that the government has been in talks with Russian and South Korean officials and state nuclear power companies about working together to build the plants over the next decade.
    "We have several predictions that show that without nuclear energy by 2030 we will face a big problem," Latif said in an interview. Not only is there a shortage of energy and increased demand to deal with it, but Iraq is also trying to cut emissions and produce more water by desalinating water.
    Iraq is not the only Arab producer of oil looking to split atoms to meet rising consumption. The United Arab Emirates, the third producer in the Organization of the Petroleum Exporting Countries (OPEC), has connected its first reactor to the grid this year and plans to operate three more reactors. Saudi Arabia, the largest producer in "OPEC", is seeking this technology and is building a test reactor, according to "Bloomberg".
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    [size=12]energy

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    Nuclear power, which does not produce carbon dioxide, will aid Gulf countries' efforts to cut emissions as governments around the world look to become greener. The technology will also allow them to harvest more valuable hydrocarbons for export. Saudi Arabia burns up to 1 million barrels of crude oil per day at its power plants during the summer months when temperatures soar above 50°C (122°F).
    The Iraqi cabinet is reviewing an agreement with the Russian company "Rosatom" to cooperate in building reactors, according to Latif. South Korean officials said this year they wanted to help build the plants and offered the Iraqis a tour of Korea Electric Power Company's reactors in the United Arab Emirates, according to Bloomberg. This file is also being discussed with the French and the Americans, and Latif expected that the first contracts would be signed next year.
    Even if Iraq builds the planned number of power plants, it will not be enough to cover future consumption. Latif said the country is already facing a shortage of 10 gigawatts between capacity and demand and expects to need an additional 14 gigawatts this decade.
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