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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Washington is changing its view of Al-Sadr. His government may undermine the influence of the factio

rocky
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Join date : 2012-12-21

Washington is changing its view of Al-Sadr. His government may undermine the influence of the factio Empty Washington is changing its view of Al-Sadr. His government may undermine the influence of the factio

Post by rocky Fri 22 Oct 2021, 6:52 am

[size=52]Washington is changing its view of Al-Sadr. His government may undermine the influence of the factions[/size]


[size=45]American policy makers saw that an Iraqi government with a strong formation of the Sadrist bloc led by Muqtada al-Sadr, and headed by Mustafa al-Kazemi, would curb the influence of the pro-Iranian factions in the country.[/size]
[size=45]And the American newspaper, "Financial Times", stated, in a report translated by Shafaq News Agency, that "the hopes that Muqtada al-Sadr will not be an agent of Tehran, led American policy makers recently to believe that a government with a strong formation of the Sadrists, may help in confronting the influence of the pro-Iranian factions and its militias."[/size]
[size=45]Al-Kazemi's chance[/size]
[size=45]And the American newspaper added, “Al-Sadr’s victory may enhance the chances of Mustafa Al-Kazemi as prime minister for a second government term, and that Al-Kazemi won the approval of the West for his intention to rein in the militias allied with Iran, but his efforts faced hostile reactions that only strengthened the weakness of the state.”[/size]
[size=45]And after the newspaper indicated that Al-Kazemi had become dependent on the support of the Sadrists who face the same accusations of corruption as others, it noted that “Al-Sadr portrays himself as a reformer, but he is a populist and is not likely to move forward with the economic and social reforms that Iraq needs,” pointing out that “ Muqtada al-Sadr is part of an establishment that constantly puts its own interests first.”[/size]
[size=45]The role of quotas[/size]
[size=45]She explained that "the nature of the divided political system and based on ethnic and sectarian quotas, means that the Sadrists will be forced to bargain with competitors to form a coalition," adding that the military power of the pro-Iranian militias guarantees them that they will be part of the equation, and that it would be a simplistic assumption that Sadr, who had a relationship Over the years, he will turn into an anti-Iranian force.”[/size]
[size=45]In this context, the newspaper dealt with Muqtada al-Sadr, who emerged victorious in the recent legislative elections, noting that he “led the Mahdi Army in a Shiite resistance against the occupation led by the United States, and was a pioneer in sectarian violence that pushed Iraq to the brink of civil war, while portraying himself as a champion of the poor Shiites and a nationalist who will face competing and destabilizing influences.”[/size]
[size=45]Bush's promise[/size]
[size=45]And the Financial Times concluded that Iraq offers a lesson that “elections alone do not guarantee the emergence of a full democracy,” noting that Iraqis are still waiting for the American promise to be fulfilled to “take the fate of their country in their own hands.”[/size]
[size=45]And the newspaper added, “In the October 10 elections, only 41% of registered voters bothered to cast their ballots, which is the lowest participation rate in the post-Saddam Hussein era,” adding that “this indifference showed Iraqis’ disappointment with the democratic experiment that heralded.” The George Bush administration has promised a lot, but so far has achieved little.”[/size]
[size=45]The newspaper reported that the Iraqis, two years after the invasion, defied violence to vote in the first elections of their country in 2005, at which time Bush said that "the men and women of Iraq have seized the fate of their country."[/size]
[size=45]And she added, "But after 16 years and five parliamentary elections, Iraqis are still waiting for Bush's words to be true."[/size]
[size=45]In the successive elections that Iraq witnessed, the Financial Times indicated that “the tone that was common among Iraqis, is that the same old factions are competing in a system infected with corruption and nepotism, a system that wasted the wealth of the oil-rich state and failed to provide job opportunities and basic services.”[/size]
[size=45]Iraq's surroundings[/size]
[size=45]The report concluded, the American newspaper, by saying that “in a region ruled by authoritarians, Iraqis at least have the option to vote, a right denied to many of their neighbors, but Iraq offers a lesson that elections alone do not guarantee the establishment of a fully functioning democracy.”[/size]
[size=45]The newspaper noted that the Western "failure", and the American one in particular, was to look at Iraq from the perspective of Iran and to bet on leaders whom the West believes better represent its interests.[/size]
[size=45]And the American newspaper considered, “It is much better to think beyond the short term and support efforts to address the root causes of Iraq’s distress, and as a start of accountability for rights abuses and corruption, and only then will Iraqis be able to begin their true faith in the democracy they were promised 18 years ago.”[/size]
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