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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Al-Sadr’s efforts to form the majority are close to dismantling the coordination framework

rocky
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Al-Sadr’s efforts to form the majority are close to dismantling the coordination framework Empty Al-Sadr’s efforts to form the majority are close to dismantling the coordination framework

Post by rocky Wed 01 Dec 2021, 6:20 am

[size=52]Al-Sadr’s efforts to form the majority are close to dismantling the coordination framework[/size]

[size=45]Baghdad/ Firas Adnan[/size]
[size=45]Observers believe that the Sadrist movement has made great progress in forming the government, stressing that the forces of the Shiite and Sunni components prefer this scenario, expecting splits in the forces of the coordination framework in the coming days and some of them joining the political majority, and they did not rule out that the losers in the elections would exert pressure in order to obtain on positions and absorb the anger of the public.[/size]
[size=45]In an interview with Al-Mada, political analyst Raad Hashem said, "The Sadrist movement is difficult to turn into the opposition; Because he feels himself the winner in the elections.”[/size]
[size=45]Hashem added, "The Sadrist movement's meetings and meetings with various parties, whether internal or external, are trying to establish the concept of who will run the state for the next stage."[/size]
[size=45]He pointed out that "the results of the October elections give a perception that the Sadrist bloc is the largest bloc tasked with forming the government, regardless of the issue of alliances," stressing that "the Sadrists confirm that they are the most capable of managing the country."[/size]
[size=45]Hashem pointed out that "the political forces do not like that the Sadrist movement turns into an opposition, and that it will not hand over the administration of the state to the second Shiite side, where the rule of law is the coalition led by Nuri al-Maliki."[/size]
[size=45]He explained, "The Sadrist movement has great previous differences with al-Maliki and does not want him to prevail and the ability to form a government or to have an important role in it."[/size]
[size=45]Hashem indicated that "the Sadrists go to the opposition, although it is an unlikely scenario, which means that they will form a strong and stubborn front that the forces forming the government cannot withstand, and in light of this we will witness many interrogations or lawsuits against officials in the next government."[/size]
[size=45]And he added, "The political scene suffers from a clear crisis and many blockages," and it is not excluded that "the losers will seek further escalation, the aim of which is to disrupt the formation of the government."[/size]
[size=45]Hashem added, "The coordinating framework still feels that its votes have been stolen and did not get its due in the elections, and therefore the picture is not clear to all, and we are waiting for the coming days and the surprises that they may carry."[/size]
[size=45]For his part, the other political analyst, Omar Al-Sharifi, said in an interview with Al-Mada that "the Iraqi parliamentary system used to form a consensual government that led to crises from which we suffer a lot until the present time."[/size]
[size=45]Al-Sharifi continued, "The effort to form a majority government at this stage does not cancel the quota nature of it, as the sharing of positions will be among the winning forces in the elections, rather than sharing them among all."[/size]
[size=45]He explained, "The most prominent obstacle to the existence of a real majority is the insistence of the main Sunni and Kurdish forces not to be present in the opposition, and they have united their efforts to participate in the next government, and perhaps the opposition will be destined for either the Sadrist movement or the coordinating framework."[/size]
[size=45]Al-Sharifi concluded, "The coming days may witness dialogues between political forces, in the hope that we will emerge from political differences and have a strong, independent government that is not subject to the hegemony of blocs, and is able to provide services."[/size]
[size=45]Political expert Firas Al-Amiri, in a comment to Al-Mada, believes that "what distinguishes the Sadrist movement and qualifies it for the success of its talks in forming a government is the unity of its position."[/size]
[size=45]Al-Amiri stated, “The coordination framework includes many components, and each of them has demands that may be different from the other.”[/size]
[size=45]He pointed out that "one of these components wants the position of prime minister, and the other is trying to justify its loss and aspires to executive positions that reduce the impact of the electoral decline."[/size]
[size=45]Al-Amiri does not rule out, that “this framework will break once the Sadrists succeed in forming a national government, and many forces have defected and joined the majority.”[/size]
[size=45]He added, to this, that "the Sadrist movement appeared to be seeking to consolidate the foundations of democracy, and the government that al-Sadr called for includes all components of the Iraqi people."[/size]
[size=45]Al-Amiri continued by saying, “The next government will not be of a single political spectrum, but rather through coalitions, some of which include forces withdrawing from the coordination framework, and the other from Sunni and Kurdish blocs, all agree on one approach, which is the public interest and the provision of services.”[/size]
[size=45]Some of the coordination framework forces have expressed new positions calling for respecting the election results and seeking to form a political majority, led by the Victory Alliance led by Haider al-Abadi.[/size]
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