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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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An American report: A "big test" between Baghdad and Erbil and "Lahiban" is thawing the ice, mediate

rocky
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An American report: A "big test" between Baghdad and Erbil and "Lahiban" is thawing the ice, mediate Empty An American report: A "big test" between Baghdad and Erbil and "Lahiban" is thawing the ice, mediate

Post by rocky Sat 18 Dec 2021, 6:28 am

[size=52]An American report: A "big test" between Baghdad and Erbil and "Lahiban" is thawing the ice, mediated by Washington[/size]

[size=45]The US Associated Press reported; That despite the long-running territorial dispute between the Baghdad and Erbil governments, the two sides are taking steps to work together to prevent ISIS from reviving itself.[/size]
[size=45]rare example[/size]
[size=45]The US agency noted in a report that the scene in the northern village of Heiban earlier this month was a rare example of cooperation between the federal government and the Kurdistan Regional Government, as their forces were strengthening a joint military site aimed at defending the village from ISIS attacks.[/size]
[size=45]From inside a hole in a trench, Iraqi soldiers were scanning the vast agricultural areas in search of militants in a place, while the Peshmerga fighters were doing the same in a place not far from them.[/size]
[size=45]The agency's report indicated that the big test is whether this "secure and fragile partnership" will remain coherent in the next stage of the war with ISIS, while the two sides say that they need the Americans to help keep this partnership in place, and that this is one of the reasons why the American military presence In Iraq, it continues, even if the combat mission will officially end on December 31.[/size]
[size=45]Although Iraq announced the defeat of ISIS four years ago, the rivalry between Baghdad and the Kurds opened loopholes that allowed ISIS to infiltrate from it, especially from the disputed areas in four governorates, Nineveh, Kirkuk, Salah al-Din and Diyala, gaps that the forces of both parties missed, knowing that in some In the regions, specific gaps were 40 kilometers wide.[/size]
[size=45]The village of Lehiban is located in one of those security gaps, and it was recently threatened by ISIS to enter it, forcing its residents, most of whom are Kurds, to flee. The agency indicated that for the first time so far since 2014, an Iraqi force and the Peshmerga have started to establish joint coordination centers around the region to enhance their ability to monitor loopholes.[/size]
[size=45]scared residents[/size]
[size=45]The report quoted the officer in the Peshmerga forces, Captain Hajar, who is responsible for the Kurdish force in the region, as saying that “ISIS took advantage of the opportunity. We coordinate. It starts here in the village.”[/size]
[size=45]Like all the residents of Heiban, Zuhair, a cement factory worker, has been spending the nights during the past months on the roof of his house, holding his rifle, and waiting, while his wife and children sleep inside the house.[/size]
[size=45]The report indicated that armed security personnel at a nearby oil company site, the only ones with night sensors, sent alert signals when they spotted ISIS militants making their way from the Qara Jogh mountain range towards the village of Lehiban, and it was up to Zuhair and other armed residents, to confront them. .[/size]
[size=45]"We were abandoned. The Peshmerga were on one side, and the Iraqi army was on the other, and none of them interfered," Zuhair said.[/size]
[size=45]After ISIS attacks on the village, three of which took place in the first week of December alone, many of the village's families were forced to leave. Zuhair moved his family to the village of Debaja, located within the relatively safe Kurdish region. While the number of Heiban families was 65 families, the rest are now 12 families, according to the village mayor, Yadgar Karim.[/size]
[size=45]On December 7, Iraqi and Kurdish forces entered the village with plans to replicate coordination elsewhere in the disputed areas. Kurdish officials hope this will encourage the villagers to return. The report indicated that "preserving the Kurdish population in the region is important to their demands for lands."[/size]
[size=45]But Zuhair is not convinced, and the report quoted him as saying, "I only came to check the situation. I am very afraid to go back."[/size]
[size=45]Wrong Entry Concern[/size]
[size=45]The report quoted the Kurdish officer, Nahar Jawhar, as saying that the Peshmerga have spread along the road adjacent to the Qara Jogh Mountains, but they do not have orders to attack ISIS sites or to carry out raids on ISIS sites because of concern that the Peshmerga may enter disputed areas.[/size]
[size=45]In addition, ISIS militants move at night, use tunnels and take shelter in caves, while the Peshmerga lacks the main necessary equipment, including night vision devices. "This is why ISIS militants are able to intimidate the population, because we can't see them," Jawhar said.[/size]
[size=45]The report indicated that talks for the establishment of joint coordination centers between the Iraqi army and the Peshmerga began more than two years ago, but faltered due to the lack of trust and differences over how to define the lines and criteria for control.[/size]
[size=45]Talks between the two parties were revived during the era of the current prime minister, Mustafa Al-Kazemi, which opened the door to an agreement to establish six joint coordination centers in Baghdad and Erbil and across the disputed areas. Al-Kazemi also agreed to establish two battalions to carry out operations against ISIS, but this step is still awaiting approval for its financing from the Iraqi Ministry of Finance, according to the leader of the Peshmerga Hajjar Ismail, who is responsible for relations in the Joint Coordination Commission.[/size]
[size=45]Between 2009 and 2014, the Iraqi and Kurdish forces carried out joint security operations in the governorates of Nineveh, Kirkuk and Diyala, but the collapse of the Iraqi army during the ISIS attack in 2014, ended this arrangement between them.[/size]
[size=45]strained relationships[/size]
[size=45]The report indicated that "the Kurdish authorities have consolidated their control over Kirkuk and other disputed areas, and occupied the oil fields, which angered the federal government, but after Iraq's victory over ISIS in 2017, Baghdad turned its attention to these areas, and launched a military operation in October / October of the year 2017 to regain control of it.”[/size]
[size=45]And he added, "Relationships soured with Baghdad cutting budget allocations to the region, which made it unable to pay public sector employees' salaries and debts to oil companies."[/size]
[size=45]The report indicated that "the Popular Mobilization Forces, which are composed of Shiite militias close to Iran, have expressed their opposition to the establishment of joint patrols with the Peshmerga, adding that the Popular Mobilization Forces have a strong presence in many of the disputed areas."[/size]
[size=45]The report pointed out that "the popular crowd has so far been surprisingly calm about the new joint arrangement, while the crowd faced a devastating loss in the recent elections."[/size]
[size=45]However, the researcher at the Institute of Regional and International Studies in Sulaymaniyah, Zaman Ali, believes, according to the report; That the crowd “at some point will speak against” the joint coordination with the Kurds.[/size]
[size=45]American mediation[/size]
[size=45]The report concluded by noting that the path towards greater coordination between Baghdad and Erbil often included the presence of the United States, adding that Iraqi and Kurdish officials say that the U.S.-led coalition mediated and provided support, two key factors in bringing the parties to the negotiating table.[/size]
[size=45]The report quoted Jawhar, the Peshmerga officer stationed in Qara Jogh, that the Americans "played an important role in coordination with us and with the Iraqi side, and without them we would not have been talking, and they will not come here, and we will not go there."[/size]
[size=45]The report indicated that the Iraqi and Kurdish parties say that they still need the Americans to play this role, adding that the American forces quietly stopped their direct participation in the fight against ISIS for months, and since that time they have been providing advice and carrying out training missions for the forces, roles that will continue with the end of The combat mission was officially launched on December 31, 2021.[/size]
[size=45]The report concluded by noting that the American presence is also important for other reasons, including the fact that the Americans pay the salaries of many Peshmerga fighters in light of the ongoing disputes with Baghdad over the budget. According to the leader of the Peshmerga, Hajjar Ismail, he says, "Fortunately, this (funding) will continue in 2022."[/size]
[size=45]Translation: Shafak Agency[/size]
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