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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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The Lausanne agreement expires in 2023 and Turkey is preparing to retake Mosul and Kirkuk: the title

rocky
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The Lausanne agreement expires in 2023 and Turkey is preparing to retake Mosul and Kirkuk: the title Empty The Lausanne agreement expires in 2023 and Turkey is preparing to retake Mosul and Kirkuk: the title

Post by rocky Tue Dec 21, 2021 7:46 pm

[size=52]The Lausanne agreement expires in 2023 and Turkey is preparing to retake Mosul and Kirkuk: the titles of our two cities[/size]

[size=45][You must be registered and logged in to see this image.][/size]

IRAQI HUFF POST - EDITOR'S MONITOR - AT A SENSITIVE TIME AND IN CONJUNCTION WITH THE SUCCESSIVE DEVELOPMENTS AND THE GROWING CONTROVERSY OVER TURKISH MILITARY OPERATIONS IN NORTHERN SYRIA AND IRAQ, THE TURKISH MEDIA OPENED THE FILE OF "TABU" OWNERSHIP DOCUMENTS DATING BACK TO THE PERIOD OF OTTOMAN RULE IN THE CITY OF ALEPPO IN SYRIA, AND THE CITIES OF MOSUL AND KIRKUK IN IRAQ .

[size=45]The report prepared by the official Anadolu Agency in Turkish and published by most Turkish media outlets said that the official archives in Turkey hold more than 77,063 original “Tabu” property registration documents dating back to the period of Ottoman rule in the Iraqi cities of Mosul and Kirkuk.[/size]
[size=45]According to the report, these “Tabu” documents date back to the period of Ottoman rule that prevailed in the two cities located in northern Iraq, and extending between 1847-1917 and are currently kept in the Archives Department of the “Tabu” Directorate of the Ministry of Environment and Urban Planning in the Turkish capital, Ankara.[/size]
[size=45]The report indicated that the archive also includes 32 notebooks containing thousands of similar documents, “Tabu” related to the Syrian city of Aleppo. Thus, the total documents relating to the three cities are estimated at nearly 100,000.[/size]
[size=45]The published reports, which indicated that these documents belong to the Ottoman citizens in those cities during the Ottoman rule, did not clarify whether they belong to citizens of Turkish origin who obtained property in those cities or whether they belong to the original citizens of Syrians and Iraqis, but they focused on highlighting the side of the administration The Ottoman Empire of those cities even back to about 100 years ago only.[/size]
[size=45]In 2003, during the American occupation of Iraq, a case was raised regarding the accusation of Turkish intelligence of carrying out a secret operation in northern Iraq, according to which the title deeds of “Tabu” were reproduced in the cities of Kirkuk and Mosul, and the Tabu departments were burned in these two cities, but any Iraqi official sources did not confirm this and the sources denied Turkish official this news.[/size]
[size=45]The sensitivity of this information lies in the fact that it comes in light of the Turkish army’s continued expansion of its operations in northern Syria within the “Euphrates Shield” operation, through which the Turkish army was able to control nearly 1,300 kilometers of land, mostly in the countryside of Aleppo, and Turkish officials confirmed that their army would continue its operations. In the cities of Al-Bab, Manbij and Raqqa during the coming period.[/size]
[size=45]It also comes in light of the increasing indications of the possibility and imminence of a Turkish military ground movement in northern Iraq, and Ankara's pursuit with all its political and military power to participate in the operation to liberate Mosul from the Islamic State and its refusal to evacuate the Bashiqa camp for the Turkish army in Iraq.[/size]
[size=45]In a speech a few days ago, Erdogan pointed out directly that the cities of Mosul and Kirkuk “were belonging to Turkey,” as he put it. “It must be understood that Kirkuk was ours, and Mosul was ours... Why do they not like these words?” I just gave a history lesson, you should understand this.[/size]
[size=45]In a vague statement that sparked a lot of controversy both internally and externally, Erdogan called at the beginning of this month to amend the July 24 agreement signed in the Swiss city of Lausanne in 1923, as a result of which Turkey's existing borders were settled.[/size]
[size=45]Over the past period, senior Turkish officials, led by President Recep Tayyip Erdogan, issued a series of threats that focused on the Turkish army's intervention in northern Iraq in the event of a direct threat to Turkish security and interests from Iraqi territory.[/size]
[size=45]Simultaneously, the Turkish media focused on republishing and promoting a historic agreement signed between Turkey and the British Mandate in Iraq after the First World War, which, according to them, allows the Turkish army to intervene to protect the Turkmens in the city of Mosul, in a scene that suggests marketing the legal cover for possible military intervention.[/size]
[size=45]Mosul is considered one of the last areas that Turkey abandoned. After the First World War, a severe diplomatic crisis erupted between the Kingdom of Iraq and the Turkish Republic over the fate of the Wilayat of Mosul, which until that time was part of the Ottoman Empire. After the War of Independence, the modern Turkish Republic considered Mosul as one of the specific issues. In the National Charter, Mustafa Kemal Atatürk said at the National Assembly meeting in 1920: “Our nation’s borders are from Iskenderun in the south, and in the southeast include Mosul, Sulaymaniyah and Kirkuk.[/size]
[size=45]But Britain, which occupied Iraq after the war, was able - in its capacity as the representative of Iraq as a mandate power - to raise the issue in the international arena, and expand its scope until it became a border problem between Turkey and Iraq, and after political skirmishes and military threats, the Treaty of Ankara was signed in 1926.[/size]
[size=45]The agreement stipulated that the Wilayat of Mosul would follow Iraq, and the Brussels line would be the dividing line agreed upon by Iraq and Turkey. The 1958 revolution and the advent of Abdul Karim Qassem to power, Turkey says that the agreement guaranteed Ankara’s right to intervene militarily in Mosul and areas in northern Iraq in order to “protect the Turkmen.”
In an article for Aksam newspaper, the Turkish expert Amin Yazigi wrote: “The agreement signed in 1926 guarantees Turkey the right to protect the brothers in Mosul to the Turkish Republic, meaning granting the right of the guarantor to Turkey,” adding: “We are the owners of the right to lands extending over an area of ​​90 A thousand square kilometers. This also includes Kirkuk, which belongs to the Turkmen. For us, Mosul, like Cyprus, by returning to the agreement, it is our right to intervene if the security of our brothers there is endangered.”
Turkish historians say that the founder of the Turkish Republic, Mustafa Kemal Ataturk, promised parliamentarians objecting to the Ankara Agreement, according to which Mosul was abandoned, to work on “restoring Mosul at the appropriate time, that is, when the time comes when we are strong.”
About a week ago, the pro-Erdogan Turkish newspaper, Delilish, published a map of Turkey that includes parts of Iraq, Syria and Bulgaria. The newspaper wrote a title on the map: “Are these lands cut off from Turkey?”, a memorandum of the Ottoman Charter of 1920, which confirms that these lands belong to Turkey .
Following the launch of Operation Euphrates Shield in Syria, Turkish activists circulated on social media a picture of a new map, which they said represents the most appropriate solution for Turkey and ends its problems in the long term, calling on the Turkish government to work on implementing it in all ways.
The map, whose circulation was limited to dozens of tweeters, includes the current map of Turkey, to which are added areas from northern Syria, especially Aleppo Governorate, as well as the regions of northern Iraq represented in the Kurdistan region and the Qandil Mountains, in which the PKK militants are stationed.
A segment of the Turkish street believes in the necessity of annexing areas from northern Syria and Iraq to Turkey. On the other hand, Arab activists accuse Turkey of seeking to expand in the Arab countries and restore the glories of the Ottoman Empire. However, the Turkish government has repeatedly denied the existence of any ambitions for it in the Syrian or Iraqi lands, and confirmed that the Turkish army He will withdraw from Syrian territory as soon as the threat of terrorist organizations is ended.[/size]

 
[size=45]Sources: Agencies - Social Media - Website Editors Publishing[/size]
[size=45]An agency that publishes texts without restrictions.. The published material expresses the point of view of its source[/size]
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