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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Iraqi government spending in the health sector is 50% less than the global standard.. About 60% of h

rocky
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Iraqi government spending in the health sector is 50% less than the global standard.. About 60% of h Empty Iraqi government spending in the health sector is 50% less than the global standard.. About 60% of h

Post by rocky Fri 14 Jan 2022, 6:48 am


[size=30]Iraqi government spending in the health sector is 50% less than the global standard.. About 60% of health expenditures are paid from the citizen's pocket


2022-01-14
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Yes Iraq: Baghdad

The problem of the health sector in Iraq is emerging as one of the most prominent problems along with other services, while government funding for the health sector represents the most significant challenges, as the Ministry of Health’s share of the budget is only about 7%, and the Ministry of Interior’s budget represents one 5 times what is spent on health .
 
In Iraq's budget for the year 2020, the budget allocated more than 2 trillion dinars only to the Ministry of Health, while the share of the Ministry of Interior's budget was more than 10 trillion dinars, which is equivalent to 5 times.
 
On the other hand, in 2020, government spending, according to the researcher in economic affairs, Miqdam Al-Shaibani, came to 5.7 trillion Iraqi dinars, which represents 7.57% of public spending, noting that “note that the World Health Organization urges that health spending be 15% of the total Government spending or 5-6% of gross domestic product,” and this means that Iraq spent only about 50% of the figure urged by the World Health Organization.
 
The organization also recommends financial protection, meaning that personal spending on health should be less than 20% of the total health spending, meaning that government spending should constitute about 80% of the total health spending of the state in order to reduce family spending, but what is happening in Iraq is that Government spending does not exceed 42%. In contrast, citizens spend 58% of their own pocket in the private health sector.
Al-Shaibani points out that, “of course, the alternative to government spending on health is personal spending in exchange for health services, which involve high risks represented in the citizen having to sell personal belongings or neglect treatment in the first place,” noting that “in many cases the citizen is forced to resort to informal borrowing. Or financing by relying on loans from family and friends.
It shows that “64% of the citizen spends it on analyzes, operations, doctors’ and hospital fees, and 36% of the spending is on medicines.”
He points out that "therefore, the high exchange rate of the dollar against the Iraqi dinar added an additional weight to Iraqi families, especially those who have chronic diseases such as cancer patients, diabetes and other diseases that need medicines imported from outside Iraq."
 
what does that mean?
Al-Shaibani shows that “according to the report on addressing the human capital crisis issued by the World Bank Group, Iraq is facing a human capital crisis according to the World Bank’s HCl Human Capital Index.”
This means that "a child born today in Iraq will not be able to achieve more than 41% of his productivity when he grows up, due to Iraq's decline in investment in the health and education sectors," considering that "the Iraqi government and the Iraqi parliament should reconsider the state's public spending and give priority to it." Health and education must be viewed as a public policy objective.
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