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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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An international organization: Al-Kazemi's government has not fulfilled its promises to hold the dem

rocky
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An international organization: Al-Kazemi's government has not fulfilled its promises to hold the dem Empty An international organization: Al-Kazemi's government has not fulfilled its promises to hold the dem

Post by rocky Tue 29 Nov 2022, 5:59 am

An international organization: Al-Kazemi's government has not fulfilled its promises to hold the demonstrators' killers accountable



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2022-11-28 23:22Shar


Shafaq News / Human Rights Watch said today, Tuesday, that the Iraqi government during the era of former Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kadhimi did not fulfill its promises to hold legal accountability for employees of the state security services and members of armed groups supported by the state responsible for killing, maiming, and disappearing hundreds of demonstrators and activists. since 2019.
This came in a 34-page report issued by the organization today, entitled: "Hypnotizing the Law: Violence against Protesters and the Perpetrators' Impunity from Accountability in Iraq", which examines the details of cases of killing, injury, and disappearance of demonstrators during and after the 2019-2020 popular uprising in central and southern Iraq.
Al-Kazemi assumed power in May 2020 promising justice for murders and disappearances, but when he left office in October 2020, his government had not made any tangible progress in holding those responsible accountable, according to the report.
Adam Coogle, deputy director of the Middle East at the organization, said: “Two and a half years after Al-Kadhimi assumed power, his promises of justice in cases of vicious violence against peaceful demonstrators have proven empty, and the killers are walking freely. The demonstrators sacrificed a lot to improve conditions in the country, even they sacrificed their lives, but Their government could not, in return, grant them even the minimum level of justice."
About 500 protesters were killed in just the few weeks of the uprising by Iraqi security forces and state-backed armed groups, according to the United Nations.
Violence against demonstrators continued even after the protests ended, with an assassination campaign targeting prominent activists, most of whom were seen as influential voices in the protest movement.
The report also stated that, six months after taking office, former Prime Minister Al-Kadhimi established a "fact-finding committee" to investigate violence committed by state security forces and armed groups against demonstrators and activists. However, the commission has not yet published any substantial information about its findings, nor has it disclosed even the cases it has investigated, let alone the results of its investigations.
In the same report, Human Rights Watch said that it had investigated 11 cases of Iraqis who were subjected to violence as a result of protest and political activity. Five of them were killed, including two women. Five others were injured and one was kidnapped and is still missing.
Victims and families of those killed or disappeared filed legal cases with police and judicial authorities, but after the authorities showed initial interest, such as collecting details of these cases, legal complaints were not resumed and the authorities did not in practice pursue their investigations or attempts to identify and hold accountable those responsible.
In its report, the organization indicated that some of the people it interviewed insisted that their cases had simply been "slept".
Amjad Al-Dahamat, 56, was a prominent activist in Amarah, the capital of Maysan Governorate in southeastern Iraq. On November 6, 2019, after weeks of protests, al-Dahamat was assassinated after leaving a meeting with a senior police commander at the main police station in Amarah, other activists who attended the meeting said. The crime occurred only a few hundred meters from the police headquarters.
His brother, Ali, 52, filed a lawsuit with the authorities, with little result. No arrests were made in the case. During his struggle to obtain justice for his brother, Ali al-Dahamat received death threats and was forced to flee Amarah, moving from one city to another, fearing that he too would be killed.
The report says that despite the lack of progress in investigations and legal accountability, the Iraqi government has provided financial compensation to most of the families of those killed. According to the United Nations, most of the families of the dead demonstrators have received financial compensation from the Iraqi "Martyrs Foundation," a government institution.
The organization confirms that the government also promised to compensate thousands of demonstrators who were maimed or injured during the protests. But only a small number of them received compensation for their injuries, and this was done after long waiting times - in some cases up to two and a half years - and at great financial cost. Many have hired lawyers to help with their claims, and some have spoken of having to pay bribes to officials to work on their claims.
The report noted that "the government of the new Iraqi Prime Minister, Muhammad Shia' al-Sudani, should publish information about the investigations of the fact-finding committee into the killings, injuries, and disappearances of demonstrators during and after the uprising."
"The government should also urge the judicial authorities to disclose information related to the status of investigations and the progress of cases," he added.
The organization continued in its report by saying, "The Sudanese government should redouble efforts to compensate victims of violence, with measures that include setting a clear and concise compensation policy for the injured, and identifying direct steps that reduce bureaucratic obstacles that impede obtaining compensation."
“The 2019-2020 uprising brought down the government and prompted early elections, and the protesters demanded accountability for the perpetrators of their violence. The prime minister can, and should, work to achieve justice that his predecessor did not,” Coogle said.
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