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    British newspaper: The repercussions of the Iraq war contributed to the rise of (populist) Trump to

    Rocky
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    British newspaper: The repercussions of the Iraq war contributed to the rise of (populist) Trump to  Empty British newspaper: The repercussions of the Iraq war contributed to the rise of (populist) Trump to

    Post by Rocky Sat 18 Mar 2023, 5:33 am

    British newspaper: The repercussions of the Iraq war contributed to the rise of (populist) Trump to power



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    2023-03-17 12:47
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    Shafaq News / A British newspaper revealed, today, Friday, that the growing "internal militancy and the rise of populist President Donald Trump to power was due to the repercussions of the Iraq war, and while security officials and political analysts warned of the spread of terrorism because of this war, they confirmed that the Americans want their wars to be short, and make a positive difference.
    The Karen Kwiatkowski Experience
    The British newspaper "The Guardian" said in a report translated by Shafaq News agency; Among the repercussions of the Iraq war at home in America is the growth of internal extremism and the rise of populist President Donald Trump to power in the White House.
    The British newspaper reported the experience of Lieutenant Colonel Karen Kwiatkowski, who was working in the Pentagon, when she learned of "the existence of a secret new department called the Office of Special Plans, which was tasked with preparing reports on intelligence information that President George W. Bush's administration wanted to hear about Iraqi weapons of mass destruction," and Kwiatkowski saw that. closely and what it described as a "disastrous war".
    The report quoted Kwiatkowski as saying about that stage, "I had great faith in my superiors, and that they must be there for a reason and that they are wise and powerful, and all these things are of the kind of fairy tales, but I realized that there are incompetent people who are in great positions."
    The report indicated that "Kwiatkowski, who was famous for her stances that reveal matters of war, has now become a farmer and also works as a part-time university professor, and sometimes tries to run for political nomination through the liberal current within the Republican Party in Virginia."
    Kwiatkowski talks about her "pessimism about war and politics even before she was assigned to work in the Pentagon's Near East and South Asia Division in 2002."
    Kwiatkowski notes that "watching closely how the American regime overturned greatly exacerbated her disappointment."
    The report quoted Kwiatkowski as saying, "There is a crisis of faith in the country, and as always, when you have these crises of faith, you see populist leaders, and Trump's emergence was certainly a response to this crisis of faith."
    "It will be very interesting to see what happens next, because Americans don't have much to be proud of," the former security official said.
    Kwiatkowski expressed her belief that "the experience of the Iraq war has strengthened the Americans' proper skepticism about what the ruling establishment (establishment) tells them, but it is not enough," explaining by saying that "if you go to a store and ask a question about weapons of mass destruction in Iraq, three of Every ten people, maybe more, will swear that all this is true, our public propaganda in this country is very good."
    Americans want short wars
    The report pointed out that "opinion poll numbers over the past two decades indicate that public attitudes toward US foreign policy are stable to a certain degree. For example, when the Chicago Council on Global Affairs asked Americans whether it would be better for the country's future to actively participate in global affairs Or if we stay out of global affairs, "71% supported activism in 2002 and still 64% in 2021 support this activism."
    The report considered that "the invasion of Iraq coincided with the collapse of public confidence in American rule since the Vietnam War, from which it had recovered for a short time after the September 11 attacks," adding that "the data shown in surveys conducted by the" Pew Research Center ", that the post-Iraq situation is more depth and permanence.
    The report quoted the expert in opinion polls, John Zogby, as saying, "These numbers say first and foremost to young people that it is not possible to trust the government." These polls also say that "the US military may be the strongest in the world, but it has limits and cannot impose its will." Even in smaller countries.
    Zogby added, "The Americans will go to war, but they want their wars to be short, and they want these wars to make a positive difference."
    The report quoted Colleen Rowley, who was working for the Federal Bureau of Investigation (FBI) and revealed security flaws that led to the September 11 attacks, and sent an open letter to the FBI director in March 2003, warning of " The flow of terrorism that will result from the invasion of Iraq.
    "Now, two decades later, no one has been held accountable for the fatal mistakes that were made," Rowley says.
    Rowley said, "The real danger lies in the fact that their propaganda (those responsible for the war) was very successful, and people like Bush and (Vice President Dick) Cheney have been whitewashed," noting that "even liberals have embraced Bush and Cheney."
    The report indicated that "the grave mistakes that were committed that led to the war on Iraq, and occurred during it, did not cause the resignation, accountability or prosecution of neither Bush nor Cheney nor any other senior official who promoted the cause of the war, then managed a disastrous occupation."
    However, the report considered that despite this, it can be said that "the stigma of Iraq led to a change in the course of US policy."
    Iraq led Obama to the White House
    The report quoted Daniel Drezner, Professor of International Politics at the Fletcher College of Law and Diplomacy at Tufts University, as saying, "It is possible to say that it was Iraq that led Obama to assume the presidency, unlike Hillary Clinton," explaining that he "does not believe that Obama would have won the primaries for the Democratic Party." of 2008, unless Hillary supported the war."
    And the report considered that "the war affected a division within the Republican Party, which strengthened the anti-interventionist movement abroad, which ultimately triumphed with the election of Donald Trump in 2016."
    The report quoted Kenneth Pollack, a Middle East and military expert at the American Enterprise Institute, as saying that "Bush and Cheney paid the political price by marginalizing them within their party," explaining that "the system punishes these people. If you are a Bushist, and if you are a neoconservative, you will not Be welcome to the party."
    The report considered that "the motive for the war was driven by partisanship, and the Bush administration despised the Democrats and all opposition, but it also worked to accelerate extremism that led to the emergence of Trump and the uprising of January 6 and the storming of Congress."
    According to Pollack, "It is very difficult to determine the extent of the Iraq (war) responsibility for that, but it seems to me that it was an important factor in making our partisan work worse."
    The report pointed out that "Pollack, who was a CIA analyst and a Democrat and a supporter of the invasion, believed that there was evidence of Saddam Hussein's weapons of mass destruction, and supported the humanitarian pretext to overthrow the dictator, but Pollack jokes when he says he The only person who has apologized since then."
    However, the report said, "Pollack's words are not entirely true, as there are others who apologized, such as conservative journalist Max Boot, who also expressed remorse," adding that "there was no public expression of remorse on the part of former senior officials who made the fateful decisions about the war."
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