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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Controversial in Iraq “and rejected by Iran”.. Who is Al-Marsoumi and who killed him?

    Rocky
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    Controversial in Iraq “and rejected by Iran”.. Who is Al-Marsoumi and who killed him? Empty Controversial in Iraq “and rejected by Iran”.. Who is Al-Marsoumi and who killed him?

    Post by Rocky Sun 10 Dec 2023, 4:07 am

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    [size=52]Controversial in Iraq “and rejected by Iran”.. Who is Al-Marsoumi and who killed him?[/size]

    [size=45][You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
    An archive photo of Fadel Al-Marsoumi from his official Facebook page.
    In the middle of the street, in broad daylight, two gunmen riding a motorcycle assassinated the controversial Shiite cleric and founder of the “Rabani Preacher” party, Fadel Al-Marsoumi, who was participating in the provincial council elections on a list bearing the name “Patriots,” with seven candidates. In Baghdad and Diyala.[/size]
    [size=45]The incident occurred yesterday afternoon, Thursday, in the “Al-Tajiyat” area, next to Al-Karkh in Baghdad. Social networking sites circulated a video clip that appeared, through a reflection on what was left of the car's glass, to have been filmed by a security man, in which Al-Marsoumi's body appeared covered in blood.[/size]
    [size=45]A statement from the General Secretariat of his party mourned him, saying, “Al-Marsoumi was attacked by the hands of treachery, betrayal, and terrorism, while he was heading to the Tajiyat area, north of Baghdad, with his driver and companion.”[/size]
    [size=45]She called on “the security services to carry out their duty in arresting the perpetrators and handing them over to the judiciary to receive their just punishment.”[/size]
    [size=45]The “Raise Your Voice” staff was unable to obtain the reactions of the “Al-Da’i” party and its candidates because they were “preoccupied with the funeral.”[/size]
    [size=45]Security expert Ahmed Al-Sharifi believes that “the assassination of the founder of a party participating in the elections, in a smooth manner, in broad daylight and in front of public opinion, is a message that indicates, on the one hand, that the parties that are moving toward tightening their grip on power do not accept a partner at the national level.”[/size]
    [size=45]He told “Raise Your Voice” that “there are two dimensions to the assassination of Al-Marsoumi: the first, a political liquidation process aimed at silencing opposition voices, and the second, a security one that indicates that the government and its institutions are unable to manage the electoral process within democratic foundations by ensuring the peaceful transfer of power.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Sharifi ruled out the existence of religious reasons for the assassination, because, as he said, Al-Marsoumi “took a religious path of his own, and did not compete with the seminary titles. He proposed the vision of an Islamic movement that would have a political doctrine more than a religious one, and began to treat the judges on this basis, and went beyond in some respects.” Sometimes the religious values, customs and traditions in Iraq, and it did not have an armed wing.”[/size]
    [size=45]One of Al-Marsoumi’s followers, who preferred to limit himself to mentioning his first name, Jaafar, told “Raise Your Voice” that he “has been following Al-Marsoumi for 13 years, because the basis of his idea depends on liberating man from slavery, making his thought liberated and not restricted by the past and inheritance, and making the present the basis of living.” With all religions and races under the rule of law.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Marsoumi, as Jaafar says, “was not exposed to direct threats, but he was exposed to veiled threats through the rejection of his proposal and his liberal thought.” He added, “His killers want to kill humanity and freedom.”
    Who is Al-Marsoumi?[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Marsoumi calls himself the “Rabani Imam” and leads a movement that undertakes to prepare for the emergence of the awaited Imam Mahdi (the twelfth imam among Shiite Muslims).[/size]
    [size=45]The movement began to emerge in the early 1990s when “things began to speak to him,” as he said in one of his meetings, which prompted him to go to Najaf to study at the seminary.[/size]
    [size=45]This happened after he graduated from the Arabic Language Department at the University of Baghdad and entered the teaching profession in Diyala Governorate, where he was born in 1967 to a simple family working in agriculture.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Marsoumi speaks in his many meetings about his exposure to persecution and surveillance by the Baath regime in the 1990s. To avoid friction, he remained in his village, committed to a small mosque that he and his supporters built, where he used to deliver his lectures and ideas to them until the fall of the regime in 2003. At that time, he began to announce his intellectual calling.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Marsoumi, as his biography published on the party’s website says, faced strong opposition from sectarian political groups “because of his reformist intellectual project through which he rejected sectarianism and internal fighting, so he and a group of his supporters founded the Al-Da’i Party in 2008,” the same year in which he was arrested along with A group of his followers because they did not comply with orders to stop near a checkpoint, which raised suspicions about them.[/size]
    [size=45]During the search of the car, leaflets were found that “destabilize security and stability,” according to what was reported by local media at the time, which quoted the mayor of Khalis district, Uday Al-Khudran, as saying, “Al-Marsoumi leads a strange movement, and claims that he is the divine imam, and that divine knowledge has been transmitted to him.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Marsoumi was accused of distorting the image of the authority, as he did not imitate any of the authorities, nor did he graduate in seminary studies.[/size]
    [size=45]Despite the many objections to which Al-Marsoumi responded, his movement expanded, according to the party’s website, and began opening offices in the Iraqi governorates where his followers were present, relying on self-financing and rejecting external funding. The “Al-Da’i” Party also participated in all parliamentary elections without achieving any results. results.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Marsoumi owns several media, research, and feminist institutions that have social and political activities that are published periodically on their websites and pages.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Marsoumi’s activity extended to London. Last June, he visited the Royal Institute of International Affairs, known as “Chatham House,” and this visit was criticized at the time.
    Controversy
    The assassination of Al-Marsoumi sparked controversy on social media, and an exchange of direct and indirect accusations was observed regarding the party responsible for the assassination.[/size]
    [size=45]Dr. Salem Al-Dulaimi, a researcher in Iran and the Arabian Gulf affairs, wrote on the “X” website that “Al-Marsoumi was ostracized by a large segment of the Shiite component, on the grounds that he brought a deviant approach that was absolutely not in line with the major authorities in Iraq and Iran.”[/size]
    [size=45]While some pointed out the possibility of Iranian fingers in the assassination. Jaafar Al-Tayeb said on “X”, “The Imam Rabbani group calls for abandoning tradition and not obeying religious authorities, and the Iranian media usually describes it as a banned group.”[/size]
    [size=45]Some people widely circulated a picture of an answer by the leader of the Sadrist movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, to a referendum from one of his followers asking him about the “Godly Preacher” movement, and he answered it briefly, “In the name of the Almighty... such allegations and farces have increased recently... so beware of them and boycott them.”[/size]
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