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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    New York Times: Fears of an expansion of the conflict are growing inside Iraq

    Rocky
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    New York Times: Fears of an expansion of the conflict are growing inside Iraq Empty New York Times: Fears of an expansion of the conflict are growing inside Iraq

    Post by Rocky Mon 11 Dec 2023, 4:32 am

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    [size=52]New York Times: Fears of an expansion of the conflict are growing inside Iraq[/size]

    [size=45]Translated by / Hamed Ahmed[/size]
    [size=45]South of the capital, Baghdad, where there lies a large, grassy agricultural area containing palm tree groves along the Euphrates River, there lies an area surrounded by checkpoints that no one dares to enter or pass through, even if they are members of the Iraqi army or government officials, without prior approval. Ali Hussein, a farmer who used to live in this area, said, “We do not even dare to ask if we can go there.”[/size]
    [size=45]The reason for this is that this area of ​​one of the parts of Iraq, which is twice the size of the city of Francisco, is controlled by armed factions supported by Iran and operates checkpoints around its borders. According to one of dozens of Western and Iraqi intelligence officers interviewed by the New York Times, the Jurf al-Sakhar area, which was later called Jurf al-Nasr, even though it is a sovereign Iraqi area, they say “is an Iranian military base.”[/size]
    [size=45]High-level intelligence and military officials say that members of these armed factions use this base to install drones and manufacture and modernize missiles using spare parts widely obtained from Iran. These weapons are distributed for use in attacks by armed factions across the Middle East, and the report indicates that this circumstance makes the Jurf al-Sakhar area a center of concern about the expansion of the ongoing war in Gaza to a wider area.[/size]
    [size=45]Such attacks have increased significantly over the past two months, while armed factions were expressing their solidarity with the Palestinians in Gaza. According to the Pentagon, since October 17, these groups have launched at least 82 attacks against American bases and installations in Iraq and Syria using missiles and drones, wounding 66 American soldiers. Regional intelligence sources say that most of these attacks used weapons coming from Jurf al-Sakhar. According to the US Department of Defense, in response to these attacks, the United States bombed two sites in the Jurf al-Sakhar area, killing at least 8 people from those factions. Retired General Kenneth McKenzie, who served as commander of the Central Command of US forces in the region, said: “They have rockets and mortars.” Pointing out that he does not know exactly the ranges that these weapons may reach now, but in the year 2020, when he was supervising the United States’ efforts to limit this arsenal, some of the ranges of these weapons were reaching targets in Jordan, Syria, and Saudi Arabia.[/size]
    [size=45]For the United States, Tehran's political gains in Baghdad and the control of factions loyal to it over the Jurf al-Sakhar area are surprising losses for it. Over the past twenty years, the governments of the Republican and Democratic parties spent more than 1 trillion and 79 billion dollars to overthrow Saddam Hussein’s regime and the war against Al-Qaeda, and then the participation of Iraqi forces in the war against ISIS, all of which was with the aim of creating a stable country and a reliable ally.[/size]
    [size=45]But instead, according to what former Iraqi Foreign Minister Hoshyar Zebari described, Iran today seemed to have “the greatest influence in Iraq.” Zebari says, “Iran’s interests and concerns affect every sector, including security and military forces and local governments.” Sajjad Jiyad, an Iraqi researcher and political analyst from the Century Foundation International Center for Studies in Washington, says that Iran, since 1979, has been aiming to remove American forces from the Middle East region, and therefore it is focusing on forming, training, and arming Iraqi armed factions that will attack American forces on the ground. Iraqi. The US Army says that during the period between 2003 and 2011 alone, armed groups supported by Iran were responsible for the killing of 603 American soldiers in Iraq.[/size]
    [size=45]In 2011, American forces withdrew from Iraq, causing ISIS to control large areas of the country, with the collapse of the army, which prompted the government to seek help from its friends, Iran and the United States.[/size]
    [size=45]Iran was quick to send trainers and weapons, and then the Popular Mobilization Forces were formed from volunteers following a fatwa by the religious authority to confront the threats of ISIS. Several weeks later, the United States sent its aid to Iraq against ISIS. The report indicates that battles took place in the Jurf al-Sakhar area during the war against ISIS, and that there were attacks launched from the area by ISIS militants on nearby villages and on Shiite visitors during religious occasions and the processions of visitors passing from there on their way to the cities of Karbala and Najaf. Karim Al-Nouri, a former leader in the Badr Organization, told the New York Times, “Iran has always prioritized the protection of religious shrines.”[/size]
    [size=45]The Jurf al-Sakhar area also occupies a strategic location that leads west to Syria and is a route for transferring weapons from there to armed factions in Lebanon.[/size]
    [size=45]At that time, every village in the Jurf al-Sakhr area was emptied of its people and told that they would return to their areas once ISIS militants were eliminated. Human Rights Watch documented the absence of hundreds of people from the region, and a report by the US State Department’s Human Rights Office issued in 2019 indicated that there are approximately 1,700 people detained in a secret prison in Jurf al-Sakhar. But after the end of the war against ISIS, the armed factions remained in control of the city. Iran, for its part, denies that it controls Iraqi armed groups that attack American forces, but in a recent interview, its Foreign Minister, Hossein Amir Abdullahian, said that he considers the United States complicit with Israel in its war on Gaza, indicating that these factions were formed to fight terrorism and occupation. .[/size]
    [size=45]In interviews conducted by the New York Times with residents of the Musayyib area and other villages, who refused to reveal their names, they said that they do not know what is happening in the Jurf al-Sakhar area and that the only people who can go there are members of armed factions, foreigners, individuals who speak with a Lebanese accent, and Iranians.[/size]
    [size=45]According to Iraqi and Western diplomats and intelligence officers, they say that members of the Iranian Revolutionary Guard and trainers in Lebanese armed factions are training militants on installing drones and how to install precision guidance systems for missiles and surface-to-air missiles. General McKenzie says: “Advanced equipment in this regard comes from Iran.”[/size]
    [size=45]In an interview in September, Prime Minister Muhammad Shiaa al-Sudani refused to answer questions regarding military activities in Jurf al-Sakhar. In October, he publicly denounced the attacks that targeted bases and camps housing American forces, but this had no effect. However, during the interview that took place in September, he expressed his hope for the return of the displaced families from the Jurf al-Sakhar area.[/size]
    [size=45]Abu Arkan, 70 years old, displaced in 2014, says: “We have not heard anything about what happened to our lands or our homes. I do not want to talk more about this issue because it saddens me. No one came to take us back, and no one compensated us for what we lost. “As if we were ghosts.”[/size]
    [size=45]• From the New York Times[/size]
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