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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Child labor in Iraq...grave violations and horrific exploitation

    Rocky
    Rocky
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    Child labor in Iraq...grave violations and horrific exploitation Empty Child labor in Iraq...grave violations and horrific exploitation

    Post by Rocky Wed 17 Apr 2024, 4:55 am

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    [size=52]Child labor in Iraq...grave violations and horrific exploitation[/size]

    [size=45]Despite UNICEF's warnings that a third of Iraq's children are going through difficult economic conditions that put them in front of the demands of working to support their families, the Iraqi Ministry of Interior says it has recorded a 50% decrease in child labor.[/size]
    [size=45]Children of Iraq
    The spokesman for the Ministry of the Interior, Brigadier General Miqdad Miri, indicated in an interview with (Al-Mada) that his ministry “continues its daily, weekly and quarterly campaigns in order to arrest all beggars and everything related to child labor and human trafficking,” adding that “there is a decrease Child labor by 50%.
    In turn, UNICEF called for “building a comprehensive environment to protect children in Iraq,” noting that “there are two poor children out of every five children in Iraq.”
    She added, “Work deprives children of their childhood and education, and it also increases their risks of exposure to serious dangers, diseases, and exploitation.”[/size]
    [size=45]“Worrying” spread
    For its part, the International Rescue Committee warned earlier of a “worrying spread” of child labor in Iraq, especially in Nineveh Governorate.
    The committee confirmed that, “through information that included 411 families and 265 children, it was found that 90% of the families included in the study had one or more working children.”
    She pointed out that “about 75% of these minors have informal and dangerous jobs, including collecting garbage or scrap metal and working in the construction field.”
    She noted that “85% of these children do not feel safe at work, for reasons including mistreatment or lack of protective equipment.”
    Child labor is not limited to one governorate alone, as it is a phenomenon that has expanded significantly in Iraq, and experts attribute the spread of the phenomenon to the poor economic and security conditions that the country is experiencing, in addition to the irregularity of the labor sector.
    Experts believe that “the reason for the spread of the phenomenon is the many conflicts and wars that have occurred in the country, the spread of unemployment, the closure of factories and companies, and the presence of an unorganized labor sector that is not controlled by either the union or the government.”[/size]
    [size=45]Laws and Protection
    The laws of the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs in Iraq stipulate that anyone who causes child labor to be punished with a penalty ranging from “a financial fine and suspension of the permit to the employer,” or even stopping the activity. In the Human Trafficking Law, anyone who exploits a person who is unaware of his rights, such as children, is punished by imprisonment or a fine.
    Last year, the Ministry of Planning said that more than a million Iraqi children are deprived of their rights, and its official spokesman, Abdul Zahra Al-Hindawi, stated at the time, saying, “Iraqi children, like the rest of their peers in the countries of the world, should live their childhood and enjoy an atmosphere of play and education instead of being in a market.” To work in fields that obscure their rights and deepen levels of deprivation, especially among poor segments of society.”
    Al-Hindawi explained, “The rate of child labor in Iraq reaches 7%,” noting that “various studies have diagnosed that children suffer discrimination between males and females in educational and recreational aspects, especially in rural areas, and protecting them is a responsibility borne by the state and society alike.”[/size]
    [size=45]“Global” rates
    For his part, the head of the Strategic Center for Human Rights in Iraq, Fadel Al-Gharawi, confirmed yesterday, Monday, that child labor is a global phenomenon, with its highest rates in low-income countries, noting that more than 200 million children in the world between the ages of 6 and 17 80% of them are employed in the labor market.
    Gharawi added, “According to the United Nations, child labor is more widespread in the African continent than in any other country, as the number of working children there reaches 72 million, followed by the Asia-Pacific continent, with 62 million.” A working child, and there are 11 million working children distributed between the Americas, which is equivalent to 5% of children,” noting that “in Europe and Central Asia, 4% of children work, and in the Arab world the percentage of child labor reaches 3%.”
    United Nations statistics indicate that “84 million children (56% of all working children) live in low-income countries.”[/size]
    [size=45]“Share” of Iraq
    The head of the Strategic Center for Human Rights in Iraq explained that “the country ranks fourth in the Arab world in terms of child labor, after Yemen, Sudan, and Egypt.”
    He stressed that “the reasons for the high rates of child labor in Iraq are due to the economic conditions due to low family income, high rates of unemployment, poverty, conflicts that Iraq has experienced, displacement, high rates of domestic violence against children, and a weak system of legal legislation and strategies to protect children’s rights.”
    Al-Gharawi called on the Iraqi parliament to “accelerate the legislation of the child protection law, amend the labor law, and tighten penalties on factory owners who employ children,” calling on the Iraqi government to “create economic opportunities for children, establish a generational fund, and set a percentage for the child until he reaches 18 years.”[/size]
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