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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Studies Center: Sudanese faces the challenges of maintaining sustainable relations with the United S

    Rocky
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    Studies Center: Sudanese faces the challenges of maintaining sustainable relations with the United S Empty Studies Center: Sudanese faces the challenges of maintaining sustainable relations with the United S

    Post by Rocky Thu 09 May 2024, 4:38 am

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    [size=52]Studies Center: Sudanese faces the challenges of maintaining sustainable relations with the United States[/size]

    [size=45]Translated by: Hamed Ahmed[/size]
    [size=45]A report by the Arab Center for Studies in Washington indicated that the Iraqi Prime Minister, Muhammad Shiaa al-Sudani, during his recent visit to the United States proposed establishing a new, strong relationship with America based on the Joint Strategic Framework Agreement of 2008, and taking into account the various pressures he faces and Iraq’s economic and security situation. His ambitious plans and aspirations may be uncertain and may face challenges from different sectors within the current political environment.[/size]
    [size=45]The report written by the former Iraqi ambassador to Washington and political activist, Rand Al-Rahim, states that, according to American and Iraqi sources, the Prime Minister’s visit was successful despite the fact that the administration of US President Joe Biden was preoccupied with the consequences of the Gaza war and the Iranian strike on Israel that came on the eve of Sudanese’s arrival in Washington.[/size]
    [size=45]The visit was not without political danger for Al-Sudani, as Republican members of Congress called on President Biden to cancel the visit on the grounds that the Iraqi government is subject to significant Iranian influence. They were referring to armed factions that target American interests and are part of the Popular Mobilization Forces, which is considered a government institution. These are the same factions that have long been calling for an end to the American presence in the country. However, these tensions and crises did not prevent Sudanese from visiting the United States and presenting his program to develop bilateral relations that include all security and financial sectors, health, environment, education, and defense, among other areas. However, Sudanese’s ambitious program It will collide with operational and political realities in Iraq.[/size]
    [size=45]In practice, Iraq still suffers from entrenched corruption, an oppressive administrative bureaucracy, a weak financial sector with residual security risks, and a workforce devoid of the knowledge and skills to keep pace with international standards. Although the government is working hard to address these obstacles, some of them are hindered by corruption, which is deeply rooted in the system and is difficult to eradicate. Such obstacles discourage attracting foreign investments.[/size]
    [size=45]The author points out in her report that the most difficult aspect of these challenges is the political challenges. Achieving a broad partnership with the United States requires national political will that may not be available at the present time. The coordination framework, which includes groups and individuals subject to US sanctions, supported Sudanese’s visit to Washington, but at the same time it wants a clearer commitment regarding the withdrawal of forces from the country. As for the State Administration Coalition, which includes Shiite, Sunni, and Kurdish blocs and parties, it supports the visit, but without any reference to the issue of the presence of American forces. The Kurds support a strong relationship and partnership with the United States, which includes security and military cooperation. Likewise, the Sunni blocs silently support the existence of strong ties with Washington as a counterweight to Iran’s influence in Iraq. However, despite these differences, the positions of both sides were reassuring to the Sudanese, and may have contributed to the success of his visit to the United States.[/size]
    [size=45]In January 2020, following the assassination of the Commander of the Quds Force, General Qassem Soleimani, and the Deputy Commander of the Mobilization Forces, Abu Mahdi Al-Muhandis, by the United States, the majority of the Shiite blocs in Parliament took a non-binding decision to remove American forces from Iraq. In February of this year, in response to the American attack that caused the death of a leader in the armed factions, Shiite blocs in Parliament denounced the assassination and called for passing a binding law to remove American forces, but Sunni and Kurdish blocs boycotted the session or abstained from voting, as did a section of the members of the coordination framework. In recognition of these pressures, the Iraqi and American governments formed in January 2024 the Supreme Military Commission Committee to determine and evaluate the future of Iraqi security needs and provide international security support in accordance with these needs. However, this does not necessarily mean paving the way for setting a timetable for the withdrawal of coalition forces, especially the American military presence in Iraq. Sudanese resisted calls to set a timetable for withdrawal, but pledged that his government would adhere to the findings of the Supreme Military Commission.[/size]
    [size=45]The report states that this trend did not satisfy the extremists. On April 20, the day Sudanese returned from Washington, a member of parliament from a political bloc within the coordination framework sent letters to the Prime Minister and other ministers requesting accountability regarding the results of the visit to the United States, especially with regard to the withdrawal of coalition forces. Days later, attacks were launched on American forces in Iraq and Syria from Nineveh Governorate. On April 26, a drone targeted a gas field in Sulaymaniyah, managed by an Emirati company. The messages were clear, which is that the factions can target American interests and undermine security in Iraq at the time and place they want, in defiance of the Baghdad government.[/size]
    [size=45]Since 2008 and the signing of the Joint Strategic Framework Agreement and through three presidencies, the United States has considered Iraq to be nothing more than a security problem and was clearly focused on its security and military needs. However, a specific relationship within this narrow framework is not sustainable or strong and lacks areas for strengthening relationships in other important economic, social and technological sectors. Implementing the broader goal of this agreement is now a necessity for the two countries and not just an appearance.[/size]
    [size=45]But there are undoubtedly bureaucratic, political, and perhaps security factors that may be taken into account, and corruption at all levels is still a problem that needs to be solved in Iraq. The United States must consider not only the benefits of implementing the Joint Strategic Framework Agreement, but also the costs of not implementing it and the resulting risks, which may include instability in Iraq and an increase in the strength of extremist groups, with regional consequences of increased Iranian influence and the possibility of dragging Iraq away from its regional Arab environment.[/size]
    [size=45]• About the Arab Center for Studies in Washington[/size]
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