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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Behind the scenes of electronic blackmail in Iraq... “A good hacker,” “blackmailing spouses,” and se

    Rocky
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    Iraq - Behind the scenes of electronic blackmail in Iraq... “A good hacker,” “blackmailing spouses,” and se Empty Behind the scenes of electronic blackmail in Iraq... “A good hacker,” “blackmailing spouses,” and se

    Post by Rocky Sat 18 May 2024, 4:44 am

    Behind the scenes of electronic blackmail in Iraq... “A good hacker,” “blackmailing spouses,” and security optimism


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    2024-05-18 03:59
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    Shafaq News/ The numbers of the spread of the phenomenon of electronic blackmail in Iraq vary, and with governmental and parliamentary optimism about the low rates of this blackmail, specialists “question” the “declared” rates versus the “hidden” rates that appear in the form of cases of divorce, suicide, and domestic violence, while other concepts emerge to the surface. This phenomenon includes “blackmailing spouses” and the phenomenon of “good hackers.”
    Electronic blackmail is one of the electronic crimes committed by electronic means, to obtain a material or moral gain from the victim through the blackmailer using methods and methods of intimidation and threatening to publish private information affecting the victim’s life, mostly through social networking sites.
    According to those concerned, the spread of the phenomenon of electronic blackmail came “as a result of the widespread use of technology and cyberspace, and the expansion of cybercrime.”
    Blackmail cases
    Many girls and young men fall victim daily to electronic blackmail, as the young man Ibrahim (a pseudonym for social necessities), who is a university graduate, reveals in an interview with Shafaq News Agency about his experience with electronic blackmail, as he states that “he was blackmailed by a Tunisian woman who tried to communicate with him.” As a doctor in a hospital, their relationship was friendly at first, but after a period of conversation he discovered that she had stolen pictures of him and had hacked his family’s pictures. He also discovered that this character was a man who surprised him by asking for an amount ($1,000) in order to delete the pictures and videos he had.”
    Wayne Ibrahim (26 years old) said, “He lived through difficult times after the blackmailer threatened to publish these pictures if he did not pay the amount required of him, but he made a decision to refrain from paying and confront the matter with absolute rejection of the blackmailer’s desires.”
    The young woman Raghad (a pseudonym) also reveals, in a previous interview with Shafaq News Agency, how she was subjected to electronic blackmail after she fell into a romantic relationship via virtual reality with a young man she met on social networking sites and he pledged to marry her, as she says, “The young man began to bargain with me for sums of money.” In exchange for not publishing pictures of me that I sent to him previously.”
    Raghad (23 years old), who preferred not to reveal her real identity for social reasons, added to Shafaq News Agency, “After the young man threatened me, I turned to my family and understood the situation, especially my mother, who in turn spoke to the blackmailer and demanded that he delete the pictures and threatened him with resorting to the police otherwise, which forced him.” To undo and delete the photos.
    Raghad warns, “What helped reduce the damage in my case is that the pictures I sent were not scandalous, but rather pictures of me at university,” sending a message to her fellow girls about the necessity of “staying away from online dating and not sending their pictures to anyone.”  
    The crime of electronic blackmail is among the most prominent electronic crimes that are currently troubling the Iraqi family, and these crimes mainly target women at a rate of 70%, and males at a rate of 30%, according to the Iraqi Ministry of Interior.
    The ages of the groups most vulnerable to this crime range from 15 to 35 years, and while the Ministry of Interior warned of “optimal immunity” from extortion operations, it emphasized working on two paths to eliminate this phenomenon.
    Between 3 - 10% 
    Maanyoun reveals that “the announced statistics on incidents of electronic blackmail may be much lower than the true hidden numbers, as most victims prefer to remain silent and meet the blackmailer’s needs for fear of scandal, which is evident through the high divorce rates, suicide rates, and levels of domestic violence.”
    Interior Ministry spokesman Miqdad Mir al-Moussawi said in previous statements, on March 5, 2024, that “the percentage of cases of electronic blackmail crimes decreased to about 3% from what they were previously, thanks to the security services’ ability to detect these cases and reach the perpetrators as soon as possible.”
    He added, "This decrease reflects the efforts made by the security services to combat this type of crime that targets citizens and threatens their privacy and digital security."
    It seems that the parliamentary side is more optimistic about the issue of electronic blackmail, as a member of the Parliamentary Security Committee, Representative Waad Al-Qaddo, revealed on September 25, 2023, that “electronic blackmail has decreased by 10% in Iraq compared to previous years,” indicating that “increasing awareness and the emergence of the role of community organizations Al-Madani and the formations of the Ministry of Interior in explaining the ways to protect accounts and the mechanisms for communicating with the security teams to report any blackmail were influential factors in deterring extortionists and trapping many of them in the grip of justice.
    Also in numbers, the Director of the Relations and Media Department at the Ministry of Interior, Major General Khaled Al-Muhanna, announced on January 20, 2024, “Community police units provided psychological and moral support to (9,384) victims of electronic blackmail, domestic violence, and escape.”
    The statistics ranged from providing care and community support to (1,455) victims of electronic blackmail, (7,362) victims of domestic violence, and (567) fugitives, both male and female, who were returned to their families during the year 2023,” Al-Mahna noted.
    According to the community police, blackmail operations are carried out through two methods. The first is to build excessive trust by the victim with the blackmailer, who begins the blackmail as soon as he obtains private photos or certain personal information. The second method is electronic hacking due to many people’s ignorance of the necessary security requirements and protection of their phones and devices. e.
    Punishment for cyber blackmail crimes
    Several Arab countries have established penalties in their laws to deal with electronic blackmail, such as Algeria, which has established a harsh penalty for threatening pictures in addition to the penalty for electronic blackmail, and other countries such as Egypt, Tunisia, and Morocco. The penalty for blackmail in the Iraqi Penal Code is represented in several articles, and such penalties apply to electronic blackmail. completely.
    In this regard, the Director of the Relations and Media Department at the Ministry of Interior, Major General Khaled Al-Muhanna, said on September 8, 2023, that “there is no explicit law that deals with electronic crimes, specifically electronic blackmail in Iraq, but despite this, the police agencies deal with the issue of blackmail in accordance with the articles of the Iraqi Penal Code.” No. 111 of 1969.”
    According to Iraqi law, cybercrimes are divided into several parts, including threats and blackmail crimes, in Articles 430-432 of the Penal Code. The penalty for these crimes, depending on the severity of the crime, is imprisonment from one to seven years.
    Article No. (430) of the Iraqi Penal Code stipulates: “Anyone who threatens a person to commit a felony against him or a member of his family, or to harm him or expose him in matters prejudicial to honor, and this is in exchange for the victim doing something for him, or forcing him to refrain from doing anything.” Anything, punishable by imprisonment for a period not exceeding 7 years or by imprisonment.”
    The same penalty shall also be imposed on whoever sends the threat and his name does not appear on it (this is more common in electronic blackmail) or if it is attributed to a group (he will be imprisoned for 7 years or imprisonment).
    Article No. (431) also stipulates: “Anyone who threatens a person to commit a crime against him (such as murder, theft, kidnapping, rape, defamation, or slander) against him or a member of his family in cases other than those mentioned in Article 430 shall be punished with imprisonment.” ".
    Article (432) stipulates: “Anyone who threatens a person by word, deed, or gesture, or sends someone to threaten him in situations other than those specified in Articles 430 and 431, shall be punished by imprisonment for a period not exceeding one year, and shall pay a fine of not more than 100 dinars.” . The text of this article is closer to electronic blackmail crimes, which are usually written or audio recorded between two people.
    Blackmailing husbands 
    In recent years, unconventional cases of blackmail and defamation have spread in Iraq in retaliation against wives if they decide to separate or to gain large sums of money, raising voices demanding the enactment of stricter laws detailing blackmail and its punishment in a way that suits the extent of the crime, to stop this phenomenon.
    The Community Police, in the Relations and Media Department of the Ministry of Interior, reported earlier that three cases of electronic blackmail, including blackmail by his wife’s husband, had been stopped in Baghdad Governorate, as a result of family problems between them, threatening to publish their marital secrets. Their case was referred to the Family and Child Protection Directorate in The Ministry also prevented the husband from publishing any content that harms his wife’s reputation or their family life, otherwise he will expose himself to legal accountability.”
    "good hacker"
    With the spread of the phenomenon of electronic blackmail, the concept of the “good hacker” emerged, which is, according to Ibrahim (one of the victims of electronic blackmail), “a positive personality who has hacking techniques, but uses them for the benefit of people. He may be a friend or an acquaintance, and he is resorted to to hack the blackmailer’s page and delete what it contains.” Pictures and clips belonging to the victim.”
    Regarding the reasons for seeking help from a friendly hacker, Ibrahim explains that “reporting and filing a lawsuit, from some girls and even young men, is seen as part of the ‘scandal’, especially for girls who fear that the blackmailer will cause them scandals, as things are.”
    However, Ibrahim, a victim of electronic blackmail, did not hide in his interview with Shafaq News Agency, “his fear that the same thing would be repeated with the friendly hacker and the latter would turn into a blackmailer as well.”
    In this regard, Shafaq News Agency documented a page on Google under the name “Free Legal Consultations” that performs almost the same role as the “friendly hacker.” The electronic page explains that “there are many Iraqi youth who are exposed to electronic blackmail from Morocco. We can help in resolving these matters.” “And providing immediate support services and legal services, in cooperation with the most skilled technicians internationally,” indicating that “you can contact us, as we are the only licensed authority in more than 22 countries around the world.” Shafaq News Agency was unable to verify the accuracy of the information contained on the page.
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