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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Iraq: Shiite pressure to end the tasks of the UN mission under the pretext of exceeding powers and f

    Rocky
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    Iraq: Shiite pressure to end the tasks of the UN mission under the pretext of exceeding powers and f Empty Iraq: Shiite pressure to end the tasks of the UN mission under the pretext of exceeding powers and f

    Post by Rocky Mon 20 May 2024, 4:17 am

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    [size=52]Iraq: Shiite pressure to end the tasks of the UN mission under the pretext of exceeding powers and fears of negative effects on fragile stability.[/size]

    [size=45]The Iraqi government, headed by Muhammad Shia al-Sudani, and the Shiite political forces included in the “coordination framework,” the most prominent supporters of the government, are pressing to end the tasks of the United Nations mission operating in Iraq (UNAMI) at the end of next year, for reasons related to the “stability” that the country is witnessing at the political and security levels. In addition to widespread political criticism of the work of the UN mission and its “exceeding” of the powers granted to it.[/size]
    [size=45]According to government spokesman Bassem Al-Awadi, Iraq asked the Security Council and the Secretary-General of the United Nations, in May 2023, to reduce the mandate of the United Nations mission “UNAMI” and conduct an objective evaluation of its work. In preparation for completing its mission and closing it permanently.
    The government links this measure to “the absence of the conditions for which this mission was established 21 years ago,” indicating that the Security Council has already “independent strategic review team” that conducted an independent evaluation of the “UNAMI” mission in which it concluded that there is no need to continue its work “in view of the positive developments.” “And the important achievements that have been achieved in Iraq and in various security, political, economic and social fields, and its regional and international relations.”
    The government confirms, according to Al-Awadi, that “terminating the mission’s work in Iraq came as a natural result of the development of the relationship between Iraq and the United Nations, and a deepening of cooperation at various other levels. The Iraqi government hopes that a Security Council resolution will be issued at the end of this month that includes a response to its request and the recommendation of the independent UN team, and organizes “Also, following up on some files through an agreed-upon mechanism will also ensure the continuation of the work of international agencies operating in Iraq.”
    Regarding the legality of the Iraqi request, legal expert Ali Al-Tamimi says that it requires a decision from the Security Council, the approval of the majority, and no objection from one of the five permanent member states, indicating that it is according to the powers granted to the Security Council under the Charter from Article 39 to Article 52, and because the Security Council is the “UNAMI” was established, and whoever extends it every year “has the right to cancel, and the decision cannot be canceled except by a decision.”
    He explained in his explanation that “dealing with the United Nations is through persuasion, argument, and proof, not desires, and the Security Council, in accordance with its broad powers, can reject the request, especially if one of the five permanent member states objects or uses a veto on the vote.”
    At the last meeting of the Security Council, a number of Council members - including Russia and China - supported Baghdad's request to end the mission of the United Nations Mission in Iraq (UNAMI) by next year, but Washington did not provide its support for this step.
    Abbas Kadhim Al-Fatlawi, Iraq's Deputy Representative to the United Nations, repeated before the Council his country's request for the international organization to end by the end of 2025 its political mission that it has been performing for more than 20 years, saying that "the mission has achieved its goals."
    Russian envoy Vasily Nebenzia supported this point of view, considering that “Iraqis are ready to bear responsibility for the political future of their country.”
    He added, "The remaining problems must not become an excuse for the United Nations mission to remain in the country indefinitely."
    Geng Shuang, China's deputy delegate to the United Nations, pointed out that within the framework of the annual renewal of the mission - whose mandate expires at the end of this May - the Council must "propose a plan in order to ensure gradual withdrawal and a smooth transition towards final withdrawal."
    Given that UN missions can only operate with the approval of the host country, Britain and France also expressed their support for the transformation of the partnership between Iraq and the United Nations.
    The United States' position was more ambiguous, as Ambassador Linda Thomas-Greenfield said that the United Nations mission still had "important work to perform" and did not address Baghdad's request.
    Greenfield stressed the mission's key role in many important political issues, such as supporting the organization of elections and promoting human rights, although Iraq clearly requested that the mission focus more directly on economic issues.
    In an assessment requested by the Council, German diplomat Volker Peretz said last March that the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq, which had more than 700 employees as of late 2023, “appears in its current form to be very large.”
    Peretz called on the mission to “begin transferring its tasks to the national institutions and the United Nations team in the country in a responsible, organized and gradual manner within an agreed upon time frame.”
    The mission - which was established by the Security Council in 2003 at the request of the Iraqi government and strengthened in 2007 and is renewed annually - has a mandate to provide support to the Government of Iraq in order to promote comprehensive political dialogue, national reconciliation, elections and security reform.
    In her last briefing before the UN Security Council, Jeanine Plasschaert, head of the UN mission in Iraq, stated that “corruption, marginalization, and militant activity are continuing challenges in Iraq.”
    She added that "Iraq 2024 is developing rapidly," indicating that "the security environment in Iraq has become more stable."
    It also considered that “armed outlaw elements represent a continuing challenge to the Iraqi state.”
    She pointed out that “there is an urgent need for elections in the Kurdistan region,” pointing out that “the political stalemate in Diyala and Kirkuk still exists, and the risks surrounding the legitimacy of institutions are enormous.”
    Ending the tasks of the UN mission enjoys broad “Shiite” political and parliamentary support, as the head of the “Ajyal” parliamentary bloc, MP Muhammad Al-Sayhud, considered the Sudanese government’s decision to request the end of the “UNAMI” mission one of the most important decisions towards “completion of national sovereignty,” indicating that all justifications for the presence of “UNAMI” “In Iraq, it has disappeared.”
    News sites close to the Shiite “framework” quoted a statement by the Jews in which he stated that “the mission’s recent actions have exceeded all the powers that govern its work.”
    He added, "The Sudanese government's decision to submit a request to the Secretary-General of the United Nations to end UNAMI's mission in Iraq is a correct decision and a real step towards completing national sovereignty."
    Last week, the Foreign Relations Committee also called for the initiation of procedures to terminate the work of the United Nations mission in Iraq.
    Vice Chairman of the Foreign Relations Committee, Jabbar Al-Kanani, said in his “blog” that “the committee calls on the Ministry of Foreign Affairs to begin procedures to end the work of the United Nations mission in Iraq, in line with the directions of the Iraqi government.”
    On the other hand, independent MP Sajjad Salem said that the request submitted by the government to end the role of the United Nations Mission in Iraq (UNAMI) means “the victory of uncontrolled weapons” in Iraq.
    The independent representative supporting the Tishreen protest movement said in a television interview that “the political and governmental effort that aims to end the United Nations mission in Iraq benefits the unruly armed groups who will achieve victory if this step is completed.”
    He believed that “the role of the United Nations mission is important to preserve the electoral process, and that the absence of the United Nations’ role in monitoring the elections weakens international monitoring of the election results.”
    Likewise, the researcher on Iraqi affairs, Mujahid Al-Taie, believes that the government’s decision to end the UNAMI mission in Iraq comes to close the door to the criticism it faces before the Security Council.
    Al-Taie wrote in his “blog” that “Baghdad seeks to end the mandate of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq (to improve security conditions and stability),” indicating that “the Iraqi government wants to put an end to Plasschaert’s criticism before the United Nations Security Council.”
    He added: “Given the dominance of armed political parties, ending the UN mission would limit international supervision, and thus endanger the fragile stability in the country,” noting that Sudanese’s efforts to end the work of the UN mission were “welcomed by his allies within the framework of Shiite coordination.”
    He stated that “the Al-Sudani administration is tired of being criticized before the United Nations Security Council, and wants to close the way to this situation,” considering that “if the end of the mandate of the United Nations Assistance Mission for Iraq is confirmed by the end of 2025, Al-Sudani’s allies will likely put this as a sign of Improving security and stability as well as a victory over foreign interference.”
    However, the Iraqi human rights expert, Ali Al-Bayati, responded to Al-Taie’s statements through a “blog” in which he stated, “The absence of criticism from within does not mean its end from the outside. This will open more room for reports from outside Iraq that are sharper and more frank about the Iraqi reality.” He added, “I think the United Nations mission was more courteous in conveying the truth.”[/size]
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