Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Join the forum, it's quick and easy

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.
Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    10 years since the “black anniversary”.. How did the emergence and decline of ISIS change Iraq forev

    Rocky
    Rocky
    Admin Assist
    Admin Assist


    Posts : 273813
    Join date : 2012-12-21

    Iraq - 10 years since the “black anniversary”.. How did the emergence and decline of ISIS change Iraq forev Empty 10 years since the “black anniversary”.. How did the emergence and decline of ISIS change Iraq forev

    Post by Rocky Tue 11 Jun 2024, 4:39 am

    [size=35][size=35]10 years since the “black anniversary”.. How did the emergence and decline of ISIS change Iraq forever?[/size]
    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
    [/size]

    Policy

    [size][size]
    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.][/size]
    2024-06-11 | 03:06
    [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]
    [/size]


    923 views


    Alsumaria News - Politics

    follows a long report, the story of the rise and fall of the terrorist organization ISIS in Iraq, on the tenth anniversary of the fall of the city of Mosul, in one of the most silent files left without resolution or revelation of its secrets, especially with the collapse of military teams with 25,000 soldiers versus 1,500 militants. Just.


    [ltr]








    0 seconds of 0 seconds Volume 0%





     [/ltr]

    The report published by the website[url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/entity/3550113759/%D9%86%D8%A7%D8%B4%D9%8A%D9%88%D9%86%D8%A7%D9%84 %D9%86%D9%8A%D9%88%D8%B2/ar/]National News[/url]The American, written by journalists and security researchers and conducting numerous interviews, recalled the tenth anniversary of the fall of[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]In June, the crisis saw the displacement of more than half a million people within weeks, as well as acts of genocidal violence against minorities as well as the 1,700 cadets at Speicher.



    Towns and cities in Sunni-majority areas were torn apart[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.], including[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]Tikrit, Fallujah and Ramadi, considering the report that this was the culmination of years of escalating sectarian tensions following the invasion of...[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]The year 2003, which turned the political system upside down.

    He pointed out that this was followed by violence between armed factions on both sides of the divide, during sectarian violence, often with foreign support, and many of these armed groups were linked to political parties.

    The report describes that the security forces in[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]At the time, they were either too weak to maintain order, or complicit in the killings, a situation that worsened after the withdrawal of US forces in 2011.

    The report shows that the war against ISIS between 2013 and 2017 cost...[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]About 60,000 people, and World Bank figures show that this also caused about $100 billion in damage.

    The report indicates that the factions that were formed or were formed before that, their strength and legitimacy were strengthened after they came under the new umbrella of the “Popular Mobilization Forces,” and they became the dominant security force in the country.

    The report asks: Why has ISIS weakened?[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]A decade after the fall[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]And what the future holds.

    Accountability remains largely absent, even though Iraqi military leaders and US intelligence were aware that the terrorist movement was rapidly gaining momentum, six months to a year before the group took control.[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]On June 10, 2014.

    On January 4, 2014, ISIS captured Fallujah, an hour's drive from[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]But the government did little to change policies widely blamed for worsening the crisis, and while they did, Iraqi security forces focused on ineffective mass arrests that alienated Sunni communities — in one case, arresting several hundred men after an explosion. A car bomb, and in the meantime, the Iraqi army was collapsing due to rampant corruption, according to “[url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/entity/2040501523/%D8%B0%D8%A7 %D9%86%D8%A7%D8%B4%D9%8A%D9%88%D9%86%D8%A7%D9%84 %D9%86%D9%8A%D9%88%D8%B2/ar/]The National News[/url]He

    points out that after the invasion in 2003, it slipped[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]led to a state of instability, which created a power vacuum, and sparked a series of events that led to the emergence of various armed groups, including Al-Qaeda in[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]And then ISIS, and the early decision taken by the United States to dismantle the Iraqi military institution caused the deprivation of many of their rights, especially among the Sunnis who found themselves - for the first time in decades - not ruling.[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]This made it fertile ground for recruiting rebels, including Baath elements.

    In 2004, he founded the Jordanian militant group[url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/entity/1264119855/%D8%A3%D8%A8%D9%88 %D9%85%D8%B5%D8%B9%D8%A8 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B2%D8%B1%D9%82%D8%A7%D9%88%D9%8A/ar/]Abu Musab Al-Zarqawi[/url]Al-Qaeda in[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]To expel foreign forces, this ostensible goal helped attract more local fighters to the ranks of his terrorist group, and Al-Qaeda took advantage of[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]Sectarian violence and instability by targeting Shiites, minorities, Iraqi security forces, coalition forces, and a large number of Sunnis who are seen as collaborating with[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.].

    It used brutal tactics, including suicide bombings against civilians, even at funerals, beatings of NGOs, and beheadings of prisoners, attracting a great deal of media attention and instilling fear.

    Although Al-Zarqawi was killed in a US air strike in 2006, Al-Qaeda continued to operate[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]Under new leadership, he continued to exploit the sectarian divide, making nearly 2,000 attempted or successful suicide bombings, but Al-Qaeda in[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]It began to weaken in the face of a brutal Sunni tribal insurgency in 2007, and an improved US strategy saw military units working more closely with local communities.

    Despite hesitation[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]The United States recruited about 100,000 fighters into a US-funded force known as the “Sahwa,” but dismantling the Sahwa and depriving them of salaries and other various methods of dealing led to the emergence of ISIS.


    Experts say the rise of ISIS was enabled by dysfunctional politics and extreme corruption within the Iraqi security forces. This has left Iraqi soldiers and police vulnerable to a group that could exploit Sunni sentiment against the government. By many accounts, the rise of ISIS tells the story of the Iraqi military's weakness more than The strength of the terrorist group.

    Military factors, including harsh crackdowns by security forces on Sunni protests, and political factors are intertwined. In 2011, at the time of the decision to fully withdraw, uniformed US military officers, civilian defense officials, the State Department and the intelligence community said: “ Hey, the Iraqi security forces aren't really ready to stand on their own yet."


    The report touches on “alien soldiers,” noting that the withdrawal of American forces in 2011 made corruption more widespread within the military institution.[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]There should have been 25,000 soldiers, but in reality there were only 10,000, most of whom were checkpoint personnel and not fighters.

    Today, ISIS is in a historic decline, conducting only a handful of attacks per month and only occasionally managing to kill any Iraqi soldiers at all, compared to hundreds of attacks per week in 2014, experts say

    .[url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/entity/401581711/%D8%A5%D8%B3%D9%85%D8%A7%D8%B9%D9%8A%D9%84 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AC%D9%86%D8%AF%D9%8A/ar/]Ismail Al-Jundi[/url], retired Iraqi brigadier general: “I believe that the army has improved greatly, the capabilities are now great, the Iraqi forces are regaining their national credibility, and people are gaining great confidence in their national forces, but he has a warning for the future, amid widespread criticism that the political class is in[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]It fails to improve the situation of ordinary communities across the country.

    “Security forces can create peace and security for a very limited time,” the report says. “If there is no government strategy that includes economic, social integration, and diplomatic efforts from regional and international players, it will not last.”

    It says, “One legacy of 2014 is that it showed how unification can be achieved.”[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]Through a common goal, but this also proved fleeting as the threat faded. Shiite groups, Kurdish groups, Sunni groups, but also the Iranians, the Americans and others, were all against ISIS, but of course, once ISIS was defeated at the regional level, questions arose about who was “It has a near-term impact in post-ISIS areas, and that's where you start to see competition between different groups looking to gain influence in the vacuum, and in the years that have followed, competition and tension between the United States and Iran has increased,”

    says Hamza Haddad, a visiting fellow at European Council on Foreign Relations, that brief moment of unity defied many experts' predictions that[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]"It will be divided forever. Many were questioning the existence of the modern Iraqi state, and today that state not only still exists, but is stronger than at any time since 1980."

    In 2014, people were wondering what the state would look like. Iraq: This question is no longer a question in 2024, even with regard to ...[url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/entity/48161/%D9%83%D8%B1%D8%AF%D8%B3%D8%AA%D8%A7%D9%86 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%B1%D8%A7%D9%82/ar/]Kurdstan Iraq[/url]The threat of secession does not exist after the failure of the independence referendum in 2017.

    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

      Current date/time is Tue 16 Jul 2024, 3:21 pm