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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    'Forced Exile,' Say Puerto Ricans Leaving Island Amid Financial Crisis

    Lobo
    Lobo
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    'Forced Exile,' Say Puerto Ricans Leaving Island Amid Financial Crisis  Empty 'Forced Exile,' Say Puerto Ricans Leaving Island Amid Financial Crisis

    Post by Lobo Wed 04 May 2016, 2:58 pm

    'Forced Exile,' Say Puerto Ricans Leaving Island Amid Financial Crisis
    by Leonor Ayala Polley


    Victor Rodríguez never thought it would come to this; next month he, his wife and their five children are moving to Connecticut leaving their beloved island -Puerto Rico - in the rearview mirror.
    He and his wife, Dr. Yolanda Pagán, a renowned rheumatologist, live an otherwise happy existence in a luxurious home in a tony suburb of San Juan. But together they decided life on the island had become unsustainable.
    "We are all so sad. We are proud to be Puerto Rican," said Rodríguez, a corporate attorney, via telephone. "We don't have much choice at this point but we tried to hang on as long as we could."
    Rodríguez and his family are set to become part of the largest migration of Puerto Ricans to the mainland United States since the end of World War II. The Pew Research Center puts population losses on the island at nine percent over the last decade.
    But is the wave of professionals leaving the island that is cause for great concern, says Héctor Cordero Guzmán of Baruch College in New York.
    "The island has made an investment in the form of their education but won't reap the rewards of that," he said. "These migrants will spend their most productive years off the island and they take their economic activity with them."
    Cordero Guzmán went on to explain that the greatest loss will be in the form of innovators and professionals who could eventually help pull the island out of economic distress by starting businesses and contributing to long-term economic growth.
    A report on migration patterns released by the Puerto Rican commonwealth shows that over the last four years about 12,000 people in the professional class - doctors, lawyers, educators, health care workers - have left the island.
    The thought of adding to that number of professionals who have already left unsettles Rodríguez. But he said it came after careful deliberation. "We needed to do what was best for our family as a whole. We don't want to leave."
    http://creditrating.einnews.com/article/324542270/F7pFg7vku2qIXrZb

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