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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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An international organization: 8.5 million Iraqis live in areas contaminated with mines and explosiv

rocky
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An international organization: 8.5 million Iraqis live in areas contaminated with mines and explosiv Empty An international organization: 8.5 million Iraqis live in areas contaminated with mines and explosiv

Post by rocky Mon 25 Oct 2021, 6:01 am

[size=52]An international organization: 8.5 million Iraqis live in areas contaminated with mines and explosive materials[/size]

[size=45]Translation / Hamed Ahmed[/size]
[size=45]A new report by Humanity & Inclusion, the international organization concerned with providing safety for those affected in the world, revealed that there are approximately 8.5 million Iraqis living in dangerous deadly places that contain explosive remnants of war and explosive devices, noting that the costs of removing mines from some areas, especially those It contains rubble like Mosul, equivalent to six times the cost of clearing mines from flat areas, and this requires Iraq to provide 170 to 180 million dollars annually, including 50 million dollars for Mosul alone, the cost of removing explosive materials there.[/size]
[size=45]The report, titled “There is no place for salvation: the impact of areas contaminated with explosive materials on the affected population in Iraq,” says that five years after the end of the battles and attacks in Iraq, there are still broken human gatherings, as are the buildings and bridges around them. The report painted a horrific picture of the daily lives of these people, as some of them fear sending their children to walk to school, or that they are in dire need of money, as they risk their lives to work in areas known to be contaminated with explosive materials.[/size]
[size=45]The report indicates that the dangers of war on civilians cannot end until the last bomb or explosive material is removed from the areas in which they live. The report highlighted the need for there to be a consensus among states on a way to protect civilians whose areas have been subjected to combat operations and battles. In their report, the researchers focused on the densely populated province of Nineveh and its central city, Mosul, as well as Sinjar and Tal Afar.[/size]
[size=45]The international organization says in its report that Iraq is one of the most polluted countries in the world with explosive remnants of war and landmines. The remnants of war are located in different areas with an area of ​​approximately 3,200 square kilometers, twice the size of the capital, London. This pollution constitutes a source of terror for the population at a time when mines and explosive materials have killed nearly 700 victims in just two years between 2018 - 2020. A huge number of nearly 8.5 million Iraqis live among these deadly places contaminated with explosive remnants of war.[/size]
[size=45]The cost of removing mines and explosive materials in cities that were subjected to bombardment and battles is equivalent to six times the cost of removing mines from flat rural areas. Where mine removal in cities requires the use of a mixture of heavy machinery and equipment, as well as the inherent danger of mine clearance workers and the surrounding risks that controlled explosions may cause collapse.[/size]
[size=45]In the cities, the completion of this work requires eight times the time required in open rural areas. Also, funding constitutes a major obstacle to accomplishing these tasks. In order for Iraq to be able to remove explosive remnants in its areas, it must allocate 170 to 180 million dollars annually, including 50 million dollars for Mosul only. “We are talking about a precise technique for laying explosives and mines, about bombs that explode with fine wires in corridors and other aerial bombs lying meters underground surrounded by rubble, as well as bombs hidden inside children’s toys,” said Alma Taslitzan, director of the organization’s Civilian Protection Department. "We may find more material as we dig," said a demining worker in Mosul. This makes the process of demining more difficult. The work requires not only removing the outer layer of the earth, but also digging deep underground.”[/size]
[size=45]The areas that were bombed are considered the most affected areas in Iraq for the period between 2014 and 2017. This experience not only cost thousands of Iraqis their lives, but also left their schools, fields, roads, homes, water treatment plants and their shops mined with explosive materials.[/size]
[size=45]"There should be no combination of bombs and cities," said the director of the Civilian Protection Division. They do not cause damage to buildings, infrastructure and people within the scope of the explosion. Rather, contamination with explosive materials robs residents of their rights with any opportunity to restore their economic and social lifeline.”[/size]
[size=45]The report indicated, according to information collected, that the damage caused by the war on the electricity sector is estimated at $7 billion, and the damage to roads, airports, bridges and railways is estimated at $2.8 billion. In Mosul alone, 9 hospitals out of 13 were damaged, as well as 169 schools damaged and destroyed.[/size]
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