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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    British report on water pollution in Iraq: 70% of industrial waste is poured into rivers

    Rocky
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    British report on water pollution in Iraq: 70% of industrial waste is poured into rivers Empty British report on water pollution in Iraq: 70% of industrial waste is poured into rivers

    Post by Rocky Sun 19 Apr 2020, 1:47 am

    [size=30]British report on water pollution in Iraq: 70% of industrial waste is poured into rivers
    [ltr]04/1920 2020 08:58:13 AM[/ltr]
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    [size=20]N [size=20]S - Baghdad

    A report by the British Royal Institute, Chatham House, said on Sunday that 70% of industrial waste in Iraq is poured into rivers for disposal, at a time when it is facing a water crisis that should be among the priorities of any future prime minister.  




    In its report on Iraqi water policy, the institute stated, and its “NASS” today (April 19, 2020) said, “Iraq is historically located in a region with the most abundant water supplies in the Middle East. But the flow of Tigris and Euphrates rivers has decreased since the 1970’s Almost 40%, partly due to measures taken by neighboring countries on the headwaters of rivers, particularly Turkey.
    He added that "high temperatures and less rainfall due to climate change are other negative factors that affect Iraq's water reserves," noting that "evaporation operations from dams and water reservoirs is that it loses the country approximately 8 billion cubic meters of water annually, as estimated by ".
    The institute pointed out that "the scarcity of water caused the drought of previously fertile lands, an increase in the poverty rate in agricultural areas and a lack of water also helped ignite conflicts between population groups", noting that "economic hardship for families who depend on their livelihoods on river water" It has pushed the people of the countryside to migrate to cities that already suffer from overcrowding, lack of services and power outages. "
    He added that "scarcity is not the most dangerous element in the Iraq water crisis, but water pollution is the most dangerous." He pointed out that "decades of government mismanagement, corruption and lack of regular procedures in waste disposal may cause the leaving of three citizens among every five without safe water." For drinking, and it is estimated that 70% of Iraq's industrial waste is poured directly into the rivers. "
    In 2018, the British Institute goes on to say, "118,000 Basra residents have been treated in hospitals with symptoms related to contaminated drinking water, which sparked public protests against poor government services."
    The research center pointed out that "the water crisis also leads to undermining the state of stability for the federal government through repeated differences between Baghdad and the southern governorates," stressing that "the priority must be to modernize the existing infrastructure for water treatment, which is often hindered by bureaucratic matters and endemic corruption." In addition to other crises that prevent new initiatives from being implemented. "
    He continued, "To break this cycle, Iraq needs a group of experts and enabling factors outside the framework of the government to work with active elements of the state bureaucracy as a force pushing towards implementation and accountability," usually that "publishing recommendations derived from the events of the Basra crisis of 2018 that have not yet been published will be a beginning Good. "
    He explained that with "the passage of time, this task force might put the water crisis issue at the top of the list of national priorities, while implementing infrastructure development projects for it and conducting more fruitful dialogues with neighboring countries."
    The British Royal Institute concluded its report by saying, "With such a high degree of administrative fragmentation and the absence of an effective government in Iraq, there are no signs of fruitful results. It is possible through participation with a combination of non-governmental actors to start addressing the water crisis as well as open a dialogue on new methods of Administration to address other important issues. This could also be a starting point for rewriting the shabby social support in Iraq. "
    Translation: Range 


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