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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    "Agence France-Presse" talks about Iraq's rivers: wastewater threatens with catastrophic pollution

    Rocky
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    "Agence France-Presse" talks about Iraq's rivers: wastewater threatens with catastrophic pollution Empty "Agence France-Presse" talks about Iraq's rivers: wastewater threatens with catastrophic pollution

    Post by Rocky Wed 21 Feb 2024, 4:49 am

    "Agence France-Presse" talks about Iraq's rivers: wastewater threatens with catastrophic pollution

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    Economy News - Baghdad
    Iraq, which is suffering from drought, is facing catastrophic pollution in its river water due to the leakage of sewage and medical waste, in light of the decline in supplies due to the dams of Turkey and Iran.
    Officials confirm that government institutions are behind part of this environmental pollution, while the relevant authorities struggle to confront this scourge that threatens public health in Iraq, according to an Agence France-Presse report.
    The risk of pollution increases with the steady increase in water scarcity as a result of drought and climate change, and the concentration of pollution in rivers increases in parallel with the decline in water levels.
    Ministry of Water Resources spokesman Khaled Shamal says that in addition to the private sector, “what is strange about the issue of pollution in Iraq is that it is carried out by the majority of government institutions.”
    He adds that among them are "sewage departments that dump large quantities (of sewage) into the Tigris and Euphrates rivers without undergoing complete treatment or after simple treatment."
    The spokesman pointed out that "most hospitals near the river throw their waste and sewage directly into it, and this is dangerous and disastrous."
    Industrial facilities also cause water pollution, including petrochemical factories and electric power generation plants, in addition to agricultural activities through drainage water, which “may contain toxins related to fertilizer,” according to the spokesman.
    Shamal explains that to confront this pollution, “the government issued directives not to approve any project if it is not linked to a water treatment plant.”
    Diyala River, east of Baghdad
    “Water Quality”
    In the same regard, Ali Ayoub, a specialist in the field of water hygiene at the United Nations Children’s Fund (UNICEF), said, “Insufficient infrastructure, limited laws, and lack of public awareness are among the main factors leading to the significant deterioration in water quality in Iraq.” .
    Thus, the expert adds, two water purification plants in Baghdad receive “double their treatment capacity.”
    As a result, Ayoub continues, “two-thirds of industrial and domestic wastewater is dumped untreated into river water,” amounting to “six million meters
    Cubic" per day.
    This tragic pollution is visible to the naked eye. In eastern Baghdad, an Agence France-Presse team saw and photographed green polluted water with a foul odor flowing into the Diyala River.
    Ayoub confirms that "the Iraqi government has expressed its commitment to improving water quality."
    He talks about developing a three-year plan aimed at “strengthening the water and sanitation system, including monitoring water quality,” to provide “safe drinking water and water purification capabilities, especially for the most vulnerable communities.”
    UNICEF, in partnership with the Iraqi authorities, contributed to the establishment of a wastewater treatment plant in Medical City, a government medical complex in Baghdad that includes about 3,000 beds.
    In the first phase, three stations, each with a capacity of 200 cubic meters per day, were opened to treat wastewater, according to Engineer Aqeel Sultan Salman, head of the projects department at the complex, adding that four other stations with a capacity of 400 cubic meters will be built within two months.
    “Pollution concentration”
    In the south of the country, pollution rates are higher. The majority of Iraqis resort to buying water in bottles for drinking and preparing food. Because the water that reaches their homes is not suitable.
    Hassan Zuri, 65 years old from the southern Dhi Qar Governorate, says that “sewage water from (other) areas flows into the river, and the water reaches us polluted.” He added, "Previously, we used to drink, wash, and farm from the river. Now we buy water."
    The matter is made worse by the worsening drought with the decrease in rain rates and water levels of the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, as a result of the dams built in the neighboring countries of Turkey and Iran, despite the objections of Baghdad.
    Ministry of Environment spokesman Amir Ali Hassoun confirmed to Agence France-Presse that "the percentages of water entering Iraqi territory have decreased significantly, and this increases the concentration of pollution in the water."
    The Tigris River in central Baghdad
    At the same time, environmental activist Samim Salam points out the importance of “activating environmental laws, holding all those who trespass on rivers accountable, and educating and guiding citizens to use water optimally” to contribute to reducing pollution.
    Hassoun says that the Iraqi government today is betting to fight water pollution “on the process of changing the behavior of the Iraqi individual by maximizing the awareness effort,” adding that there is “strict control” over health activities, explaining, “We impose on all hospitals the establishment of wastewater treatment units.”
    Hassoun hopes that the year 2024 will be the year in which all environmental transgressions resulting from “health activities” stop.




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