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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    The hell of Burma .. Muslims are slaughtered and the world is rising

    Rocky
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    The hell of Burma .. Muslims are slaughtered and the world is rising Empty The hell of Burma .. Muslims are slaughtered and the world is rising

    Post by Rocky Wed 06 Sep 2017, 1:55 am


    The hell of Burma .. Muslims are slaughtered and the world is rising

    Arab and international Since 2017-09-05 at 15:55 (Baghdad time)

    Follow up of Mawazine News
    The crisis of the Ruhingya Muslim minority in Burma again shakes the world and returns to the forefront of international events, to be the headline in news bulletins, after the military authorities in Burma intensified their repression against Muslims there.
    The United Nations said Tuesday that 123,600 people, mostly Muslim Rohingyas, had fled the violence in Burma to flee to Bangladesh.
    The number of refugees reached a peak in the last 24 hours as 37,000 refugees crossed the border in one day.
    Burma's poor Rakhine state, bordering Bangladesh, has been the epicenter of religious unrest between Muslims and Buddhists for years.
    The Rohingya minority was forced to live under restrictions on freedom of movement and citizenship and was similar to apartheid.
    The latest violence in October, after a small group of Rohingyas attacked a number of border posts, is the worst in the state in years.
    The UN says the Burmese army has committed crimes amounting to crimes against humanity in its response to attacks.
    Myanmar, also known as Burma, has its official name Republic of the Union of Myanmar and has long been subjected to a repressive military rule that spanned between 1962 and 2011.
    The generals who ran the country at the time repressed all dissidents, headed by opposition leader Aung San Suu Kyi, to face international condemnation, accusations of human rights violations and economic sanctions.
    Myanmar's military government moved the capital in 2005 from the city of Rangoon to an uninhabited site at the time carrying the name of Naypeidaw.
    The new capital is strategically located in the center of the country, but some in Myanmar believe the military did so after a miner warned of a foreign military attack.
    Since 2010, a gradual transition has begun in the country when the military agreed to hand over power to a government headed by reformist general Thein Sein, culminating in the 2015 takeover of Soke's National League for Democracy (NLD).
    Ten Kyaw has been sworn in as president since March 2016 to lead the first democratically elected government after decades of military rule.
    Suki was constitutionally deprived of running for office, making it clear that whoever was to take over would be her arm and denied accusations that she supported the army's ethnic genocide against the Rohingya minority.
    It will be remembered that Tin Kyaw was the first elected civilian president of Myanmar and the first president of her democratically elected government. Nevertheless, the army still has significant authority over the government and the parliament.
    • The world condemns and protests
    Asian and Asian countries have sharply criticized Burma and its prime minister Aung San Suu Kyi on Monday over the suffering of the Muslim minority of the Rohingya, in conjunction with the UN's announcement that tens of thousands of them have taken refuge in Bangladesh.
    More than 123,000 Rohingyas have been in Bangladesh for the last 10 days, while another 20,000 are waiting to cross after fighting between rebels and the Burmese military forces has intensified in the western province of Rakhine in a bloody conflict.
    Rakhine's poor state bordering Bangladesh has been the epicenter of sectarian unrest between Muslims and Buddhists over the years, with the Rohingya minority forced to live under restrictions on freedom of movement and citizenship, like apartheid.
    The latest violence, launched in October after a small group of Rohingyas attacked a number of border posts, has been the worst wave in years. The United Nations suspects the Burmese army may have committed crimes amounting to crimes against humanity in its response to the attacks.
    Burma's leader and Prime Minister Aung San Suu Kyi, who has lived through imprisonment and house arrest under Burma's former military junta, is increasingly criticized for not condemning the Rohingyas or criticizing the army.
    Suu Kyi, who won the Nobel Peace Prize in 1991, has not made any statement since the recent clashes 10 days ago.
    Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan accused Burma last week of "genocide" against the Rohingya.
    "Unfortunately, there have been major massacres in Burma, humanity remains silent," the Turkish president said on Monday.
    Erdogan said Turkish relief organizations were providing assistance and would raise the issue at the UN General Assembly in September.
    • Angry Muslim neighbors
    The crisis threatens Burma's diplomatic ties, particularly with Muslim-majority countries in Southeast Asia, where public anger is mounting over the treatment received by the Rohingya minority.
    The Maldives said it had cut off trade with Burma "until the government of Burma takes measures to deter atrocities against the Rohingya Muslims," ​​according to a Foreign Ministry statement.
    The statement did not specify the volume of trade exchange between the two countries, but this move may push other countries to follow suit.
    Indonesia's foreign minister, Ritno Marchudi, on Monday met with Burmese army chief General Min Aung Hlaing in Naipedao to pressure the Burmese government to contain the crisis.
    "Once again, the violence and this humanitarian crisis must stop immediately," Indonesian President Goku Widodo said on Sunday when he announced the mission of the country's foreign minister.
    Indonesian police said the Burmese embassy was hit by a firebomb on Sunday morning in Jakarta, where police had previously foiled two attempts to blow up the building by Islamist militants.
    On Monday morning, dozens of demonstrators demonstrated in front of the embassy, ​​where armed police were deployed, and the barbed wire fence was installed around the headquarters.
    The Pakistani foreign ministry said it was "deeply concerned about reports of an increase in the number of people killed and forcibly displaced from the Muslim Rohingya."

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