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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    An American advisor explains the reason for the "stumbling" of building the air force in Iraq

    Rocky
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    An American advisor explains the reason for the "stumbling" of building the air force in Iraq Empty An American advisor explains the reason for the "stumbling" of building the air force in Iraq

    Post by Rocky Sat 24 Apr 2021, 8:13 am

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    Baghdad - IQ  
    The War Aviation Adviser for the US Air Force, Tobias Switzer, said that the US military has not been able to build effective and sustainable air forces in Iraq and Afghanistan after 15 years of war and reconstruction efforts .
    Switzer wrote an article on "War on the Rocks" explaining the reasons for the failure of US forces to create an air force for the two countries, despite the absence of external obstacles to establishing an Iraqi or Afghan air force .
    The writer pointed out that the United States' provision of aircraft and capabilities that are not suitable for the Iraqis and Afghans, and the dispatch of military personnel not ready to negotiate the cultural differences between the two countries, hindered the process of building air forces .
    According to Switzer, a military fellow at the Center for Strategic and International Studies, by using airpower, security forces can reduce distances and time to respond quickly to insurgent attacks and continue long ground operations by restoring supplies .
    Aerial surveillance and reconnaissance capabilities can provide Iraqis and Afghans with critical intelligence and enhance tactical awareness during ground force missions . 
    The air force can also evacuate victims .
    While a partner nation's air force cannot replace its army or police during the counterinsurgency, it can provide an edge over the destabilizing actors, expand government legitimacy in the eyes of its population, and reduce the need to use American aircraft .
    Historians George Calley and Forrest Marion provide outstanding evidence to explain the failures of the aviation security forces' assistance missions in Iraq and Afghanistan . 
    Cooley's book, Coping or Failing, provides an excellent description of the organizational changes that the US Air Force has committed to reorienting itself toward rebuilding Iraqi aviation capabilities .
    In Iraq, Cooley says in his book that inadequate aircraft and capabilities have been provided to the Iraqis .
    Cooley's book provides a 4-year look at the US Air Force's Aviation Security Forces mission in Iraq, beginning in 2004. Cooley explains the evolution of air force organizations responsible for training, advising, assisting, and equipping Iraqi partners . 
    The Air Force did not have ready and experienced advisers, and the mission did not receive the attention of its general officers and civilian leaders . 
    Cooley pointed out that the decisions to purchase aircraft for Iraq were taken randomly, as decisions regarding the number and type of aircraft that must be provided to the partner country and the structure of sustainability and training contracts have great weight in determining the success of the mission .
    After the withdrawal of US forces from Iraq in 2011, US advisers returned to Iraq in 2015 to assist in the state’s efforts against ISIS, which took control of separate parts of Iraqi territory .
    The Iraqis suffered from the presence of advanced combat aircraft that are difficult to maintain in the heat and dust, and are not suitable for irregular warfare, and they failed to employ them in the air campaign against the extremist organization, according to the writer .
    In Afghanistan, Marion says in her book, that the prevailing culture led to the failure of the Afghan pilots to come to work and shirk their duties, which frustrated the American advisors .
    Drawing on personal experience, interviews, and extensive records, Marion sets up her book, The Dangers of Flight, in Afghanistan to recount the personal challenges that coalition air advisors faced in directing, training and instructing Afghan pilots .
    One of the basic Afghan practices, which is hateful to US air advisors, has been to assign Afghan aircraft and crews to covert, non-military missions, often directly from generals or political leaders .
    According to Marion, the advisers believed that Afghan leaders routinely chose planes and pilots for their own, often illegal, purposes .
    Likewise, the SIGAR's scathing report for 2021 explains how the US Air Force purchased 20 medium-lift G.222  transport aircraft for the Afghan Air Force in 2008. The aircraft proved unsafe, unreliable, and difficult for Afghans to maintain; Because they had no spare parts .
    Since 2010, the United States has spent more than $ 8.5 billion to develop the Afghan air force . 
    Marion notes that making Afghans unaccountable for expensive aviation resources may have fueled the same corruption that impeded the functions of air advisors . 
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