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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    Political deadlock threatens to lead to “conflicts” and elections may be a “last resort”

    Rocky
    Rocky
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    Political deadlock threatens to lead to “conflicts” and elections may be a “last resort” Empty Political deadlock threatens to lead to “conflicts” and elections may be a “last resort”

    Post by Rocky Fri 29 Jul 2022, 4:27 am

    POSTED ON[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] BY [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

    [size=52]Political deadlock threatens to lead to “conflicts” and elections may be a “last resort”[/size]

    [size=45][You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]Fears of armed clashes between the various political parties. archival[/size]
    [size=45]Amid a state of political paralysis, and the failure to choose a new prime minister and president for the country, Iraqis believe that the solution may lie in holding early elections to avoid political differences turning into a direct clash.[/size]
    [size=45]Iraq set a new record, with the passage of 291 days since no candidates were chosen for the presidency or the government, not to mention the aggravation of differences, especially between “Shiite” parties, and one of the results of which was the storming of thousands of supporters of the Shiite leader, Muqtada al-Sadr, the parliament building, chanting slogans against political parties. other Shiites.[/size]
    [size=45]On social media, media professionals and activists raised the idea of ​​holding early elections. Academic Zaid Abdel Wahab Al-Azami said in a tweet on Twitter that "the current's demonstrations are not against the framework candidate, the content of the message (the ear of the ear) is that they do not impose a fait accompli government, and let's agree on a date for early elections run by a caretaker government."[/size]

    [size=45]Firas Al-Saray said in a brief tweet, "Iraq is going to early elections."[/size]

    [size=45]The journalist Samir Obeid wrote in a tweet, "..as long as the political blockage has reached the brink of danger and blood..Keeping Al-Kazemi's government safer and going towards early elections after a year. He will save Iraq and the people from blood!”[/size]

    [size=45]Analysts who spoke to Al-Hurra believe that holding early elections may mean reproducing the political crisis and repetition of the current political conditions.[/size]

    'Not a priority'

    [size=45][You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]Political paralysis left Iraq without a public budget[/size]

    [size=45]Amid a state of political paralysis, and the failure to choose a new prime minister and president for the country, Iraqis believe that the solution may lie in holding early elections to avoid political differences turning into a direct clash.[/size]
    [size=45]Iraq set a new record, with the passage of 291 days since no candidates were chosen for the presidency or the government, not to mention the aggravation of differences, especially between “Shiite” parties, and one of the results of which was the storming of thousands of supporters of the Shiite leader, Muqtada al-Sadr, the parliament building, chanting slogans against political parties. other Shiites.[/size]
    [size=45]On social media, media professionals and activists raised the idea of ​​holding early elections. Academic Zaid Abdel Wahab Al-Azami said in a tweet on Twitter that "the current's demonstrations are not against the framework candidate, the content of the message (the ear of the ear) is that they do not impose a fait accompli government, and let's agree on a date for early elections run by a caretaker government."[/size]

    [size=45]Firas Al-Saray said in a brief tweet, "Iraq is going to early elections."[/size]

    [size=45]The journalist Samir Obeid wrote in a tweet, "..as long as the political blockage has reached the brink of danger and blood..Keeping Al-Kazemi's government safer and going towards early elections after a year. He will save Iraq and the people from blood!”[/size]

    [size=45]Analysts who spoke to Al-Hurra believe that holding early elections may mean reproducing the political crisis and repetition of the current political conditions.[/size]

    'Not a priority'



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    Political paralysis left Iraq without a public budget
    [size=45]Adel Al-Manea, a member of the State of Law coalition led by Nuri al-Maliki, rejects the idea of ​​holding early elections, and stresses that "the solution lies in paving the way for a political consensus on a new government."[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Manea told Al-Hurra that “the current caretaker government has a political incompatibility, and for this the country needs a new government as soon as possible, which may go with Parliament to amend the electoral law.”[/size]
    [size=45]The outgoing government of Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kazemi continues to conduct business. If the parties do not agree on a new government, this government may continue for a transitional period until new elections are held.[/size]
    [size=45]The Shiite parties, which represent the majority of the population in Iraq, retain the position of prime minister, the Kurds head the country, and the Sunnis head the parliament.[/size]
    [size=45]Forming a government in Iraq usually takes months and requires winning the support of all major political parties.[/size]
    [size=45]Rahim Al-Aboudi, a member of the General Authority of the Wisdom Movement led by Ammar Al-Hakim, asserts that “the early elections are not a priority, but they may be the last medicine and the last resort to resolve the political impasse.”[/size]
    [size=45]In a statement to Al-Hurra website, Al-Aboudi said that we may need “initiatives and compromises, by forming a government for a temporary period,” stressing that any choice that will be taken must be agreed upon by “all parties.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Aboudi stresses that the attempts of the coordination framework, “meet the ambitions, but we are witnessing a complexity in the political scene, at a time when we need concessions from some parties, especially from the Sadrist bloc, which has become the most prominent player in forming the government.”[/size]

    “increasing the burden”

    [size=45][You must be registered and logged in to see this image.][/size]
    Iraqi protesters inside the parliament building in Baghdad
    [size=45]And political analyst researcher Haitham Al-Haiti believes that "holding early elections will produce two scenarios that will increase the burdens of the political crisis in Iraq."[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Hiti explains, in a telephone conversation with Al-Hurra website, that the first scenario “by re-running the elections, may mean that the results are repeated and the country enters a new crisis, especially amid the weak voter turnout by the people.”[/size]
    [size=45]He added that "the previously announced participation rate, with the participation of 40-45 percent, represented those who updated their information and registered to participate in the elections, and it represents about 25 percent of the Iraqi people who are entitled to participate in the elections," meaning that about 75 percent The percent of those entitled to vote are not represented in Parliament.[/size]
    [size=45]As for the second scenario, according to Al-Hiti, “the idea of ​​democracy in Iraq is thwarted, especially if we find the country facing an armed confrontation between weak political forces.”[/size]
    [size=45]Moqtada al-Sadr, who won the most votes in the October elections, withdrew his 74 deputies from parliament last month after he failed to form a government that excludes his Shiite rivals, most of whom are backed by Iran and have heavily armed wings.[/size]
    [size=45]After months of negotiations, al-Sadr left to his opponents in the coordinating framework, a coalition of Shiite forces, the task of forming the government after he took a sudden step by withdrawing his deputies from Parliament. The framework includes, in particular, the bloc of former Prime Minister Nuri al-Maliki and the Fatah bloc representing the Popular Mobilization, and blocs that did not achieve significant results in the elections, such as the Wisdom Movement.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Sadr effectively prevented this month from nominating his arch-rival Al-Maliki, accusing the former prime minister of corruption in a tweet on Twitter.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Sadr's rivals put forward another candidate, Muhammad Shia Al-Sudani, for prime minister, but Al-Sadr also opposes his candidacy because he is an ally of Al-Maliki.[/size]

    A new social contract

    [size=45]The political analyst, Raad Hashem, said that "the Iraqi people are reluctant to participate in the political process, especially since the recent early elections, the results of which were not in harmony with the aspirations of the demonstrators in the Iraqi street."[/size]
    [size=45]Hashem stresses that resolving the political crisis in Iraq requires "a new socio-political contract, reinforced by international intervention, to remove the specter of internal war that is looming on the horizon, so that we do not witness Shiite-Shiite clashes."[/size]
    [size=45]In an interview with Al-Hurra, Hashem suggests consensus on “continuing the work of the current government, which has relative acceptance inside and outside the country, and defining a transitional period that guarantees the occurrence of real political reform, which pushes the Iraqis to participate in an election that represents all the people, not just the armed factions.” .[/size]
    [size=45]Analyst Haitham Al-Hiti does not rule out that "elections are a final solution" to the political crisis, "but it must be preceded by an Iraqi national conference under impartial international sponsorship, which contributes to the participation of all Iraqis, especially the 75 percent who did not participate in the last elections."[/size]
    [size=45]He believes that the problem "is not with the current election law, as much as it is represented in the presence of sectarian political forces at a time when Iraq needs forces that prioritize the Iraqi identity at all levels."[/size]
    [size=45]Adel Al-Manea, a member of the State of Law coalition, points to the possibility of reaching a consensus on the government in Iraq “by setting a specific time for its existence, provided that it proceeds with steps and a roadmap that may lead to parliamentary elections in later stages, but it is not a priority.”[/size]
    [size=45]In 2019, mass protests erupted in Baghdad and the cities of southern Iraq. The demonstrators demanded the departure of the parties that had been in power since the 2003 US-led invasion that toppled Saddam Hussein's regime, accusing them of corruption that led to the country's decline in several areas.[/size]
    [size=45]Security forces and armed factions killed hundreds of demonstrators and wounded thousands, and the protests gradually ended in 2020, with Mustafa Al-Kazemi assuming the premiership as a consensual candidate following the protests, and he promised early elections, which he held on the tenth of October.[/size]
    [size=45][You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

      Current date/time is Fri 21 Jun 2024, 6:51 pm