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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Officials: The development of the tourism industry is important for the country as another resource

    Rocky
    Rocky
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    Officials: The development of the tourism industry is important for the country as another resource Empty Officials: The development of the tourism industry is important for the country as another resource

    Post by Rocky Tue 16 Nov 2021, 6:29 am

    [size=52]Officials: The development of the tourism industry is important for the country as another resource[/size]

    [size=45]Translation / Hamed Ahmed[/size]
    [size=45]Nothing makes the heart of the archaeologist, Amer Abdul Razzaq, more happy than seeing tourists visiting the archaeological sites in his area of ​​residence in Dhi Qar Governorate, southern Iraq. He spared no effort to make his town a tourist destination despite the many obstacles he faced over the years.[/size]
    [size=45]"Dhi Qar is an open air museum," said archaeological researcher and director of Dhi Qar antiquities, Abdul Razzaq, 46, in an interview with The National News website. It is deeply rooted in history, with more than 1,200 archaeological sites.”[/size]
    [size=45]The province, which is 400 km south of Baghdad, is considered the incubator of many famous ancient cities and settlements that developed in the southern part of Mesopotamia during the fourth and third millennium BC.[/size]
    [size=45]Among the most famous of these sites is the city of Ur, which is mentioned in the Old Testament book as the birthplace of the Prophet Abraham, where rich empires flourished. To the southwest of Ur lies the Eridu region, which is considered one of the oldest historical cities in it.[/size]
    [size=45]In Dhi Qar, there is also the administrative city of Sumer, known as Larsa, as well as the historical cities of Lagash, Girsu and Uma.[/size]
    [size=45]But with nearly 25,000 archaeological sites discovered across Iraq, they have been seriously damaged by decades of war, lack of security and mismanagement. Many of these historic cities have over decades been eroded and left neglected. They are close to public residential areas and were left unguarded as they were easy targets for antiquities thieves and smugglers.[/size]
    [size=45]Archaeologist Abdul Razzaq was calling for an increased awareness of the importance of antiquities. And he posted on his Facebook page a topic related to antiquities. It is presented in a simple and effective way, in which it invites the general public, especially children, to visit the museum and archaeological sites and participate in cultural activities.[/size]
    [size=45]Abdul Razzaq says, “I always talk about antiquities everywhere, in schools, cafes, and even in the alleys. I moved this world from the academic place in universities and research sites to the street.”[/size]
    [size=45]For him, the museum is a “factory for preparing a generation that belongs to this country. But unfortunately, today we have generations who have only opened their eyes to wars, economic sanctions, occupation and terrorist groups.”[/size]
    [size=45]His efforts paid off, as many of the artifacts began arriving at the city's museum instead of the black market, and volunteers offered financial help for restorations. A workshop was established inside the museum to make replica pieces, and work is underway to open a library next to the museum. A 67-page tourist guide was printed for all archaeological sites in the province.[/size]
    [size=45]In order to boost the flow of tourists, he must coordinate this with the security authorities. He recently succeeded in persuading them to cancel a decision that requires external visitors to have a guarantor from within, due to the presence of a huge security prison in the area called Al-Hout Prison, in which prisoners accused of terrorist cases live. Because of the many previous prison escape incidents, the authorities imposed restrictions on visitors coming from outside the governorate.[/size]
    [size=45]On a recent visit to his office, Abdul Razzaq was making phone calls with a military commander to allow a group of young people to set up an astronomical observation camp in the historic Eridu region.[/size]
    [size=45]"We have to restore people's confidence in their identity and the civilization of their country, Mesopotamia," Abdul Razzaq said. "We have to let them know Iraq's historical status and role in the world."[/size]
    [size=45]In 2016, UNESCO included the marshes area in the province, along with three historical sites, including Ur and Eridu, on the World Heritage List, which encourages tourists to visit those areas.[/size]
    [size=45]Archaeological researcher Abdul Razzaq said that the Pope's recent visit to Ur has paved the way for what is known as Christian religious visits to the region, and this is what we have been working to achieve and develop. Following that visit, the Iraqi government announced plans to build a tourist city near the city of Ur with an area of ​​2 square kilometers called the Abrahamic City. It will include a center for interfaith dialogue with a mosque and a church.[/size]
    [size=45]Last year, the United Nations Development Program announced a project, Sumerion, funded by the European Union to support socio-economic growth through eco-tourism, preserve cultural heritage in Dhi Qar Governorate, and develop it as a tourist destination. The European Union is preparing to spend 2 million dollars over two years, and the project will be implemented by the United Nations Development Program with the participation of local authorities in the governorate and other non-governmental organizations, local and foreign.[/size]
    [size=45]Wooden corridors were built to take visitors to the important archaeological sites in the Ur region, the ziggurat building, the house of the Prophet Ibrahim, as well as the royal tomb and the Dobla Mach temple, which is the oldest court in history. The project includes the construction of fences around some sites and the installation of a new lighting system and information panels in Arabic and English.[/size]
    [size=45]With the temperature starting to drop in the governorate, the tourist season has begun in Dhi Qar. Hundreds of local and foreign tourists began to flock, especially to the marshlands of Ur region. And that foreign excavation missions have been granted licenses to work in various archaeological sites.[/size]
    [size=45]“We urgently need to develop the tourism industry in the country,” Abdul Razzaq said. And that we do not depend on oil imports only.”[/size]
    [size=45]About the national news site[/size]
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