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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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An American report: Iraq is facing the largest water crisis in its history, and farms have turned ba

rocky
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An American report: Iraq is facing the largest water crisis in its history, and farms have turned ba Empty An American report: Iraq is facing the largest water crisis in its history, and farms have turned ba

Post by rocky Sat 25 Dec 2021, 6:23 am

An American report: Iraq is facing the largest water crisis in its history, and farms have turned barren

  •  Time: 12/24/2021 23:25:08
     
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{Variety: Al Furat News} A report by the American newspaper "Los Angeles Times" sheds light on the "biggest water crisis" in the history of Iraq and how it caused farmers to migrate to their lands and turn fruit tree fields into barren, barren lands.
The report took Diyala province as an example of the "thirst of Iraq", a country that is considered the cradle of agriculture in the world and is known as a fertile land for its dependence on two "great" rivers, the Tigris and the Euphrates.
The report says that climate change and the unjust water policies of neighboring countries have caused the largest water crisis in the country's history.
Taha Yassin is one of the farm owners in Diyala who told the newspaper about the change in the city, which was previously crowded with shoppers coming from all over Iraq to buy pomegranates, apricots and oranges.
Yassin owns three fields to grow pomegranate and grapes, but today they are all empty after he had to cut down most of his pomegranate trees. “We are no longer able to grow because of the lack of water.” 
According to the newspaper, Turkey and Iran have built dams and tunnels to divert water from the tributaries of the Tigris and Euphrates, leaving Iraq, which depends on the Tigris and Euphrates for 60 percent of its fresh water resources, suffering from severe shortages.
It adds that the flows coming from Turkey decreased this year by about two-thirds, while those coming from Iran decreased by only about 10 percent.
Climate changes have exacerbated the deepening of the crisis, as rains are scarce and temperatures rise to levels of 50 degrees Celsius at many times in the summer.
The newspaper quotes the California-based "Berkeley Earth" organization, which is concerned with climate sciences, saying that temperatures in Iraq have increased by twice the global average.
And last year, Iraq ranked fifth on the United Nations list of countries most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, according to the newspaper. 
By 2050, the World Bank expects in a report released last month that an increase in temperature of one degree Celsius and a decrease in precipitation by 10 percent will cause Iraq to lose about 20 percent of its available fresh water.
The newspaper says that under these conditions, water will not be available for about a third of Iraq's arable land.
She adds, "This is what actually happened in Diyala, where almost all areas of the governorate were dropped from the government's agricultural plan for summer crops, with the exception of strategic crops such as wheat and barley." 


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