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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    The dropout contributed to raising illiteracy rates.. Dhi Qar unveils a program to address student d

    Rocky
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    The dropout contributed to raising illiteracy rates.. Dhi Qar unveils a program to address student d Empty The dropout contributed to raising illiteracy rates.. Dhi Qar unveils a program to address student d

    Post by Rocky Tue 15 Feb 2022, 5:42 am

    [size=52]The dropout contributed to raising illiteracy rates.. Dhi Qar unveils a program to address student dropouts from school[/size]

    [size=45]Dhi Qar / Hussein Al-Amil[/size]
    [size=45]Yesterday, the Dhi Qar Education Directorate revealed a program to address students’ dropout from school seats, and while it indicated that the program’s vocabulary was applied to 22 schools in separate areas of the governorate, the Office of the Human Rights Commission attributed the reasons for the dropout to economic and administrative factors, the marginalization of physical and artistic education lessons, and the transformation of schools. to a repellent environment.[/size]
    [size=45]The Office of the Human Rights Commission in Dhi Qar and community organizations estimate the dropout rates of students and students from school in Dhi Qar at rates ranging between 5 to 10 percent, while official sources indicate a rate of 2 percent.[/size]
    [size=45]Regarding the Dhi Qar Education Directorate’s plan to reduce the high dropout rates, the director of the Nasiriyah Education Department, Imad Al-Ibrahimi, told Al-Mada that “a ministerial committee was formed in cooperation with the British British Council to adopt a program to address the dropout and raise the rates of student enrollment in schools,” noting that “The committee in Dhi Qar governorate includes a number of representatives of government departments represented by Dhi Qar education, community police, sports, youth and health, not to mention community organizations and influential social figures in its social environment.”[/size]
    [size=45]Noting that, “at the beginning of its work, the committee chose a sample of schools consisting of 22 schools to implement the vocabulary of the approved program in this field,” and he added that “the implementation of the program in the mentioned schools has resulted in the return of 70 dropout students to study seats so far, and that this was an incentive to expand its application to include Other schools," noting that "the dropout rates in the Nasiriyah Education Department constitute 2% of the school's student population." About 700,000 students are enrolled in the schools of Dhi Qar Governorate, which amount to 1,169 school buildings, and they are still suffering on a daily basis from many problems, most notably overcrowded classrooms and double or triple shifts, not to mention the age of the buildings and their lack of the basics for the success of the educational process.[/size]
    [size=45]On the most prominent paragraphs of the drop-out reduction program, the Director of the Nasiriyah Education Department said that “the approved program includes procedures, field follow-ups, visits to schools and families of dropout students to determine the reasons that prompted them to drop out of school, and the assistance of community organizations, district selectors, and owners of capital, and their involvement in the committee’s work for the purpose of providing material and social assistance to families. The poor, whose children are forced to drop out of school because of destitution,” noting that “material destitution, bullying and family disputes were among the main reasons.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Ibrahimi stressed that "drop-outs are one of the main reasons for the high rates of illiteracy in the province."[/size]
    [size=45]The Education and Higher Education Committee of the Dhi Qar Governorate Council had warned on the 19th of September 2017 of the high rates of students dropping out of school and the exacerbation of the illiteracy problem against the background of the issuance of a ministerial decision to reduce students’ quota of stationery and limit its distribution to the first three grades in primary schools. The committee considered the decision a threat to the benefits of free and compulsory education.[/size]
    [size=45]For his part, the director of the Office of the Human Rights Commission in Dhi Qar, the jurist Abdul Hussein inside Al-Mashrafawi, warned of the high dropout rates of students and students from various school levels and explained to (Al-Mada), saying that “the manifestations of the high rates of dropouts from school seats in Dhi Qar governorate have become one of the most prominent negative indicators.” Which raises concern about the citizen’s right to education and the future of future generations,” attributing “the reasons for the dropout to a number of factors, most notably the economic conditions and the high poverty rates to more than 45 percent in the governorate, not to mention the transformation of schools into a repulsive environment.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Mashrafawi explained that "the dropout rates range between 5 to 10 percent in the governorate's schools, and the most worrying is the dropout of primary school students," noting that "this would cause great harm to the future of the dropouts."[/size]
    [size=45]The Director of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights stressed “the need to allocate a financial grant to school students for the purpose of encouraging them to study, and according to what was approved by the House of Representatives in its previous sessions, especially for poor families,” stressing that “material destitution and the inability of poor families to bear the burdens and costs of study drives many families to Tolerating manifestations of leakage.”[/size]
    [size=45]And he indicated that "some poor and large families often have to force some of their children to drop out of school and keep some in order to reduce the costs of study," noting that "dropouts from these families are forced to work to help their families secure the money necessary to complete a study." their brothers and provide their supplies of stationery, clothes and other requirements.”[/size]
    [size=45]Societal organizations had previously warned of the dangers of class disparity in education by restricting poor students and circumventing the free and compulsory education laws, attributing the high rates of students dropping out of schools to the increase in poverty rates in the governorate.[/size]
    [size=45]On the impact of the school environment on the high dropout rates, the Director of the Office of the Office of the High Commissioner for Human Rights said that “the deterioration of infrastructure, overcrowding in classrooms, triple shifts, and schools’ lack of squares and regular halls make schools a repulsive environment,” noting that this would “prevent the development of students’ talents and limit students’ skills.” Their giving is a result of students not practicing extra-curricular activities such as physical education, art and scouting, because the triple shift reduces the time scheduled for teaching, which forces school administrations to bypass sports and art education lessons in favor of scientific lessons and other lessons.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Mashrafawi pointed out that “depriving students of extra-curricular and recreational activities made them less willing to study and deprived them of developing their talents, and thus made schools a repulsive environment.”[/size]
    [size=45]The education sector in the governorate faces a number of challenges, including the lack of school buildings, their aging, overcrowding in classrooms and classrooms, and the lack of staff and educational specializations.[/size]
    [size=45]The participants in the educational reform symposium organized by the demands group in Dhi Qar on Sunday (October 7, 2018) in the gardens of the Economists Association, held the influential political parties responsible for the collapse of education, the high rates of illiteracy and the spread of underdevelopment in society, while stressing the importance of adopting competence and experience in the field of education. Education management rather than party loyalty to hold office.[/size]
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