Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Join the forum, it's quick and easy

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.
Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    After deportation from America .. Iraqis are afraid and isolated in their country !!

    Rocky
    Rocky
    Admin Assist
    Admin Assist


    Posts : 265044
    Join date : 2012-12-21

    After deportation from America .. Iraqis are afraid and isolated in their country !! Empty After deportation from America .. Iraqis are afraid and isolated in their country !!

    Post by Rocky Wed 25 Sep 2019, 4:10 am

    [size=35][size=35]After deportation from America .. Iraqis are afraid and isolated in their country !![/size]
    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

    International

    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

    2019-09-25 | 03:48
    [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]



    [/size]


    2,849 views


    [size=18]A report by the Reuters news agency told stories of Iraqis who had been "forcibly" deported from the United States to their country, most of them "isolated and scared" and did not speak Arabic.


    According to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] , " The Iraqi carryover" [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/1325782038/%D9%87%D8%A7%D9%86%D9%8A %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%A8%D8%A7%D8%B2%D9%88%D9%86%D9%8A/ar/]Hani Bazona[/url] spent most of the past eight months since he was deported from the United States in January in a small room in the Iraqi city of Basra , waiting daily visit from his sister.






    Some days, he says, he found it difficult to get up from a mattress on the floor. On other days, he spends time looking at pictures of his wife and seven children, all US citizens. His eldest son is a US Marine intern and the youngest is three years old.

    "I am very afraid to leave the house," said Bazouni. "I don't know anyone here and I have no money."

    He is one of dozens of Iraqi origins deported by the United States since 2017 when [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] agreed to take back its criminal record citizens as part of an agreement to remove the country from President Donald Trump's travel ban list that targeted residents of many Muslim-majority countries.
    [rtl]Related articles[/rtl]


    Members of Congress, lawyers and human rights activists in the United States say that [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] , still torn by sectarian strife 16 years after the US invasion of its territory, is not a safe place for such returnees.

    Bazzouni moved as a refugee in the 1990s to the United States, where he spent time in prison on assault charges. He has also worked as an army translator, a job that puts him at risk in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] where influential armed factions backed by Iran oppose the presence of US troops in the country.

    His family does not let him leave the house for fear of being arrested by the forces of these factions.

    Prior to 2017, [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] rejected such deportations, citing political and logistical considerations related to human rights.

    "I never imagined I could go back to Iraq," Bazouni said. "I lost my job, I lost my family, I lost my children, and maybe soon I lost my life."

    After the 2017 agreement, the US Immigration and Customs Administration arrested hundreds of 1,400 Iraqis eligible for deportation because of their criminal newspaper, which prevents them from obtaining US citizenship.

    She said at the time that she was arresting convicts or those who had committed abuses ranging from murder to drug trafficking, who had been deported by an immigration judge.

    The American Civil Liberties Union filed a lawsuit on their behalf. That initially disrupted the deportation but the case changed course after the ruling was overturned and deportations accelerated in April.

    According to the Immigration and Customs Administration, 61 Iraqis were deported during that year as of September 30, 2017, and the authorities deported 48 Iraqis and then 12. The [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/1953321572/%D8%A7%D8%AA%D8%AD%D8%A7%D8%AF %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AD%D8%B1%D9%8A%D8%A7%D8%AA %D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D8%AF%D9%86%D9%8A%D8%A9/ar/]ACLU[/url] said[url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/1953321572/%D8%A7%D8%AA%D8%AD%D8%A7%D8%AF %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AD%D8%B1%D9%8A%D8%A7%D8%AA %D8%A7%D9%84%D9%85%D8%AF%D9%86%D9%8A%D8%A9/ar/][/url]The Immigration and Customs Administration has informed him that 30 Iraqis have been deported so far this year. Many of the more than 370 people arrested since 2017 are now awaiting deportation. "The deportees are automatically treated with suspicion solely for their connections to America,"

    said [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/3644504268/%D8%AF%D8%A7%D9%86%D9%8A%D9%8A%D9%84 %D8%B3%D9%85%D9%8A%D8%AB/ar/]Daniel Smith, a[/url] human rights researcher who testified to dozens of deportations.

    Some of them arrive in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] which they have not visited for decades without a social network, identity papers and a little Arabic. Smith says this fragile situation leaves them vulnerable to charges of espionage, kidnapping for ransom and harassment by faction forces.

    Neither [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] nor the White House responded to requests for comment from [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]. The Department of State referred questions to the Department of Homeland Security. Neither the Department of Homeland Security nor the Department of Immigration and Customs responded to the request for comment.


    “Persecution, torture or death”

     
    Nine men who the US traveled to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] in interviews with [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] described their suffering for integration. They said that, after being separated from their families and removed from their jobs, they felt depressed, wanting to commit suicide and fear for their own safety.

    Some cited mistreatment by the Immigration and Customs Administration, which they said forced them to sign deportation orders or stole money they had when they were arrested. The Immigration and Customs Administration did not respond to the request for comment.

    One man, 55-year-old Nasih, who asked [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] not to give his full name, said he spent two days asleep on a couch at [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] airport where he could not find a place to go after being deported until someone who did not know a phone lent him looking for a place to go.

    He found a roommate named [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/3414930342/%D8%AC%D9%8A%D9%85%D9%8A %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AF%D8%A7%D9%88%D9%88%D8%AF/ar/]Jamie Daoud[/url]Deported from [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] . Both are members of the Christian minority that the Trump administration has said it wants to protect.

    Daoud was born in a refugee camp in Greece to an Iraqi father and mother and did not see [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] before he was deported. David, 41, has mental problems and diabetes. His family said he died last month because he could not get medical care in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] was buried in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] two weeks ago.

    "There will be more likes of [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/3414930342/%D8%AC%D9%8A%D9%85%D9%8A %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%AF%D8%A7%D9%88%D9%88%D8%AF/ar/]Jimmy David[/url] if this continues," said Congressman Andy Lavin . Lavin, a [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] Democrat, says the deportation violates US law and seeks bipartisan support for a bill to stop it.

    Lavin's office said his district had the largest number of [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] born residents[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]In the country authorities have deported eight of them since April.

    Lavigne said most of the deportees had committed their crimes at a young age and had signed agreements with prosecutors to plead guilty to certain privileges, but did not realize that this would result in the cancellation of their US residency cards.

    "Most of these people do not speak Arabic. They have never been to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] or have not gone since they were young. You send them mainly to persecution, torture or death." Our policy does not allow this. ”

    Naseh, who works as a bishop, was convicted in 1989 on a simple drug-related charge. A deportation court ordered his deportation in 1994 and revoked his residency card. He served several terms in jail in subsequent years on non-violent drug-related charges.

    “No identity”

     
    Lavigne, lawyers and human rights defenders argue that if deportation cannot be stopped, the US and [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] at least give the deportees appropriate identification papers.

    Most of them no longer carry their original Iraqi identity papers and said their US identity papers were taken from them by the Immigration and Passport Administration during their detention. [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] allows them to be deported with single-use travel documents that expire after six months.

    "The local authorities do not consider these papers to be sufficient proof of identity," Smith said, meaning they are left vulnerable to arrest by Iraqi authorities.

    The [url=https://www.alsumaria.tv/Entity/1023968287/%D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B3%D9%81%D8%A7%D8%B1%D8%A9 %D8%A7%D9%84%D8%B9%D8%B1%D8%A7%D9%82%D9%8A%D8%A9/ar/]Iraqi embassy[/url] in Washington referred [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] questions to [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] Ministry of Foreign Affairs, which did not respond to the request for comment.

    Obtaining Iraqi identity documents is difficult. Some of the deportees have waited for weeks and months and even one of them has waited more than a year.

    Nasih faced many obstacles to obtaining identity papers. His travel document expired last month and his birth certificate was stolen 40 years ago.

    "For Iraq, I am without identity, but I was Iraqi enough to deport me," he said.

    He said his efforts to obtain identity documents included digging in the ruins of his old house in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] tracking relatives around the world on Facebook and trying to find his father's grave in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] .
     
    His options ran out

     
    "I was 55 years old and I spent 40 years in [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.] never left. Is there anything more to be an American?" He said. He became an American and at least let me be an Iraqi. ”


    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
    [/size]

      Current date/time is Sun 25 Feb 2024, 11:17 pm