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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Did Al-Sadr back away from “regime change” in Iraq?.. Analysts answer

rocky
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Did Al-Sadr back away from “regime change” in Iraq?.. Analysts answer Empty Did Al-Sadr back away from “regime change” in Iraq?.. Analysts answer

Post by rocky Thu 11 Aug 2022, 5:05 am

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[size=52]Did Al-Sadr back away from “regime change” in Iraq?.. Analysts answer[/size]

[size=45]Arabic 21- Walid Al-Khazraji[/size]
[size=45][You must be registered and logged in to see this image.][/size]
Al-Sadr's supporters sit in the Iraqi parliament - Getty
[size=45]The announcement of the leader of the Sadrist movement in Iraq, Muqtada al-Sadr, that “the dissolution of parliament has become a popular, political and elitist demand, with no alternative,” raised questions about whether he had retracted calls for regime change in the country, after his followers took control of the parliament building and talked about “liberating it.” “Of the corrupt.[/size]
[size=45]Since last July 30, followers of al-Sadr have been camping inside the Iraqi parliament building in the Green Zone in central Baghdad, after storming it twice within 72 hours, in protest against the nomination of the "coordinating framework" forces, MP Muhammad Shia'a al-Sudani to head the next government.[/size]
[size=45]A dangerous slide.

Commenting on this, the professor of media in Iraq, Dr. Ghaleb Al-Dami told “Arabi 21” that “the withdrawal of the Sadrist bloc’s deputies from parliament was an unsuccessful decision, and I consider it a mistake made by the leader of the Sadrist movement.”[/size]
[size=45]Al-Daami explained that “the Sadrist movement’s proposal to change the constitution and early elections was only through constitutional mechanisms. When early elections are held and the constitution is amended, and after obtaining a high number of seats with its partners, they go to change the system to presidential or semi-presidential.”[/size]
[size=45]He continued: “The Sadrist movement does not call for changing the regime through revolution, because changing the regime through revolutions happens if all the people are rebellious, and today the Kurds want the parliamentary system because it achieves their presence, and the same is true for the Sunnis, so it is very difficult to change the regime in Iraq to presidential".[/size]
[size=45]And the Iraqi expert close to the Sadrist movement added, "But it is easy to hold early elections, and to go to amend some important paragraphs in the Iraqi constitution, which were the reason for disrupting the political process in Iraq."[/size]
[size=45]The media professor considered that “the coordination framework is divided on itself, as some want to give a date for the solution and conditions. They say that after the formation of the government, we talk about the issue of holding early parliamentary elections, and that this discussion may not be inevitable by holding elections.”[/size]
[size=45]He added: “Therefore, al-Sadr does not trust these promises, because he says we have previously promised leaders in the (coordinating framework) and they did not fulfill their promises. Perhaps only Haider al-Abadi is trusted by the movement.”[/size]
[size=45]He pointed out that "setting a date for early elections is not in the hands of the prime minister only, but there are political actors who must abide and give a solemn charter that they will hold the elections in order to overcome the crisis."[/size]
[size=45]Al-Daami pointed out that "the Sadrist movement believes that the opportunity now is appropriate to hold early parliamentary elections under the government of Mustafa Al-Kazemi, but I fear that the situation will slip into a dangerous slide in light of the intransigence of the coordination framework and the insistence of the Sadrist movement on their demands."[/size]
[size=45]For his part, Haider Al-Barzanji, head of the Alwan Center for Strategic Studies in Iraq, said that “Al-Sadr’s decision is not a regression, but rather a realistic

field reading of the political reality, that there is no national consensus to dissolve Parliament and end the political process, but even regionally. Internationally, it is not possible.”[/size]
[size=45]Al-Barzanji added in an interview that “Iraq is linked to an international system, whether we like it or not, and therefore Sadr is part of the Iraqi political system, and it cannot impose a hypothesis that is not acceptable to the national consensus, and accordingly his reading in the issue of dissolving Parliament, that it is a demand that cannot be achieved.”[/size]
[size=45]The Iraqi expert pointed out that "the current system was not built easily, but was built with the blood of martyrs and sacrifices, while we acknowledge the existence of problems and ills in the system, but the solution to these problems is not to end the political system, but rather the treatment must be from within the political system."[/size]
[size=45]Regarding Al-Maliki’s refusal to dissolve Parliament and his emphasis on the necessity of convening it, Al-Barzanji saw that “this is a rational, legal and constitutional requirement, and all political forces have stated that the parliament must be dissolved by the parliament itself, because the current government does not have the capacity to dissolve parliament, as it is for the conduct of business. “.[/size]
[size=45]He continued: "The matter is not stubbornness and confrontation as much with a party, but rather it is he who adheres to the constitution and the law in front of those who want to dissolve the Parliament and zero the political process with a personal opinion or one political regular."[/size]
[size=45]Al-Barzanji expressed his belief that “things are moving forward, and that what al-Sadr proposes to dissolve parliament must be presented to members of parliament of all political sects and sects, and the opinion is left to them, and they are the ones who choose either to stay or to resolve, there is the real field.”[/size]
[size=45]And the political analyst close to the “coordination framework” expected that “the parliament will return to work and things will proceed to the formation of the government, and there may be an agreement between al-Sadr and other political forces, because there is an international and regional movement in this direction at the present time.”[/size]
[size=45]Mutual escalation

In light of the current crisis and political paralysis in Iraq, Al-Sadr said in a statement, on Saturday, that “by the grace of God and the efforts of the heroic sit-ins, positive responses came regarding the dissolution of Parliament, a popular response and a clan response, and from some Kurdish and Sunni political leaders, and even Shiites as well. “.[/size]
[size=45]He added, "Yes, the dissolution of Parliament has become a popular, political and elitist demand, with no alternative, and to silence all the mouths of the corrupt wherever they are," calling on political leaders and civil society institutions to "take a serious stand to save Iraq from the tusks of corruption and dependency, and to correct the course of the political process, which has harmed the country." “.[/size]
[size=45]In response, Nuri al-Maliki, the leader of the State of Law coalition that leads the "Coordination Framework", rejected in a televised speech on Monday, al-Sadr's calls to dissolve parliament and hold early elections before the parliament returns to session.[/size]
[size=45]Al-Maliki said that “Iraq is a country of components, and only the will of the entire people can be imposed on it and through its constitutional institutions represented by the elected parliament,” adding: “There is no solution to Parliament, no regime change, and no early elections unless the parliament returns to session and it is the one who discusses these demands, Whatever he decides, we go with it.”[/size]
[size=45]As a result, Al-Sadr tweeted again, yesterday, Tuesday, saying: “I swear with your blood, Haidar, and your crippled cub. God does not rule over us (the corrupt) and like me, he does not pledge allegiance to (corruption), will not Nasser help us?”, in reference to his continued rejection of a candidate "The Coordination Framework".[/size]
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