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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    An American official returned from Baghdad: Sudanese is currently in a better position and there are

    Rocky
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    An American official returned from Baghdad: Sudanese is currently in a better position and there are Empty An American official returned from Baghdad: Sudanese is currently in a better position and there are

    Post by Rocky Mon 19 Feb 2024, 4:29 am

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    [size=52]An American official returned from Baghdad: Sudanese is currently in a better position and there are no negotiations with Iraq[/size]

    [size=45]A senior American official, who had just returned from Baghdad, objected to describing the military dialogue with Iraq as “negotiations,” saying that what is taking place between the two countries are “discussions to develop the security partnership,” while stressing that partners in the Iraqi government have “valuable views” regarding the danger posed by It faces Iraq, and it is currently not related to ISIS as a top security priority.[/size]
    [size=45]The American official, who spoke of “heated discussions” between the US State Department and the Pentagon regarding attacks against their soldiers in Iraq, said that the list of “hostile” targets was drawn up and targeted in isolation from the Iraqi-American dialogue.[/size]
    [size=45]This official, when he was returning from an official business trip in Baghdad, expressed his optimism for a greater role for Prime Minister Muhammad Shiaa al-Sudani after the recent decline in factional attacks against American bases in Iraq.[/size]
    [size=45]A senior American official:
    At first, the Americans believed that the Iraqi call for a rapid withdrawal from the country was just talk to calm a boiling cauldron within the rivalries of the Shiite parties.[/size]
    [size=45]An internal memorandum about Al-Sudani:
    There is an internal memorandum circulated by the US State Department (days after the killing of Abu Taqwa Al-Saidi) which stated that Al-Sudani specifically told Washington that he did not want the forces to leave, but he issued the call for calm inside, and we are waiting to see what happens.[/size]
    [size=45]Biden and the State Department’s dispute with the Pentagon
    There are heated discussions that took place between the State Department and the Pentagon about the Iraqi invitation (not a request). They were aimed at formulating the appropriate way to deal with it, to prevent going towards an uncalculated path in the region, and not to deal with it as a fait accompli. They said: We will not go out under the threat of someone putting a gun to our heads.[/size]
    [size=45]The Pentagon was very eager to take quick field positions. They spoke the Askar language and had a 250-year-old doctrine. They were opposed to careful political balancing, and ultimately the last word came from President Biden.[/size]
    [size=45]Circus rope
    Foreign policy makers were saying that the Sudanese president is facing a complex crisis, between the escalation in Gaza and the critical balance with Iran. Between them was a circus rope, and he had to be careful not to fall. In this sense, those concerned with the Iraqi file in Washington were drawing up uncertain plans, and the military did not like them.[/size]
    [size=45]Why is it dialogue and not negotiations?
    What happened in Baghdad in early January was not a negotiation at all. This is a mistranslation of what we do. We did not negotiate, nor did we sit at a table in Baghdad with negotiators. What happened were technical discussions to develop our mission in Iraq.[/size]
    [size=45]Even after the end of the first round, we were very clear that a list of specific goals was being implemented according to a plan and schedule, and would not be affected by the discussions, which I repeat were not negotiations, and will not be.[/size]
    [size=45]What General Fowl said to the Iraqis
    before the first talks session attended by General Joel Fowell: We told the Iraqis that you are capable of confronting terrorist groups, but that you alone are less effective and need an additional budget to cover the costs of our absence.[/size]
    [size=45]We spoke with the Iraqi government about the risks. We told them that we were hearing highly valuable perspectives on assessing threats, and that there were partners of the government (outside the coordination framework) who believed that ISIS was not the biggest concern now, and they knew what threat we were talking about.[/size]
    [size=45]Now the Iraqi Prime Minister feels less pressure as a result of the factions' retreat from attacking the bases, and we hope that his plan to extinguish the boiling cauldron is going well.[/size]
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      Current date/time is Fri 19 Apr 2024, 7:16 am