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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Exposing American practices in Iraq.. The founder of WikiLeaks is threatened with 175 years in priso

    Rocky
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    Exposing American practices in Iraq.. The founder of WikiLeaks is threatened with 175 years in priso Empty Exposing American practices in Iraq.. The founder of WikiLeaks is threatened with 175 years in priso

    Post by Rocky Tue 20 Feb 2024, 4:17 am

    [size=35][size=35]Exposing American practices in Iraq.. The founder of WikiLeaks is threatened with 175 years in prison[/size]
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    02-20-2024 | 02:29
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    Alsumaria News - International

    WikiLeaks founder Julian Assange will launch, on Tuesday, what may be his last chance before an English court to stop his extradition to the United States to face criminal charges, including charges under the Espionage Act, according to what Reuters revealed.


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    Who is Julian Assange?
     
    Assange was born in Townsville, Australia, in July 1971, to parents who worked in the theater and traveled extensively.
    As a teenager, Assange gained a reputation as a sophisticated computer programmer, and in 1995 he was arrested and pleaded guilty to hacking. He was fined, but avoided prison on the condition that he would not commit the crime again. In his late twenties, he went to the University of Melbourne to study mathematics and physics.



    What is WikiLeaks?

    Assange launched WikiLeaks in 2006, creating a "drop dead letter" website for would-be leakers.

    The site rose to prominence in April 2010 when it published a secret video showing a 2007 US helicopter attack that killed ten people in the Iraqi capital, Baghdad, including two Reuters news employees.

    It published more than 90,000 secret American military documents about the war in Afghanistan, and about 400,000 secret American files about the Iraq war. The two leaks represent the largest security breaches of their kind in American military history.

    This was followed by the release of 250,000 secret diplomatic cables from US embassies around the world, with some information published by newspapers such as the New York Times and the British Guardian.

    The leaks angered and embarrassed US politicians and military officials, who said the unauthorized publication put people's lives in danger.

    Former military intelligence analyst Chelsea Manning spent seven years in a military prison accused of leaking hundreds of thousands of letters and cables to WikiLeaks, before being released on the orders of President Barack Obama.



    Arrest and the start of the legal battle

    On November 18, 2010, a Swedish court ordered Assange detained as a result of an investigation into allegations of sexual crimes committed by two Swedish WikiLeaks volunteers. On 7 December 2010, Assange was arrested by British police under a European Arrest Warrant (EAW) issued by Sweden.

    Assange denied these allegations and said from the beginning that he believed the Swedish case was a pretext for his extradition to the United States to face charges over the WikiLeaks leaks.

    He was ordered extradited to Sweden for questioning in February 2011, and his subsequent appeals failed. In June 2012, shortly after the UK Supreme Court rejected his final appeal, he entered the Ecuadorian embassy in London to seek asylum.

    Assange for seven years in the Ecuadorian embassy Ecuador

    granted Assange asylum on August 16, 2012, and British police guarded him around the clock to prevent his escape, saying he would be arrested if he left.

    The impasse left Assange living in cramped quarters at the embassy. Swedish prosecutors dropped their investigation in 2017, but British police said he would remain under arrest if he left the embassy due to his earlier failure to surrender himself on bail.

    On April 11, 2019, Assange was escorted screaming from the embassy and arrested after Ecuador revoked his political asylum.

    The following month, he was sentenced to 50 weeks in prison for breaching bail conditions. In June 2019, the US Department of Justice formally requested that Britain extradite him to the United States to face 18 charges of conspiring to hack US government computers and violate espionage laws.

    Although Assange completed his prison term in September 2019, he remained in Belmarsh maximum security prison awaiting his extradition hearings.

    On January 4, 2021, a British judge ruled that Assange should not be extradited to the United States, saying that his mental health problems meant he would be at risk of suicide.

    But in December 2021, the American authorities won an appeal before the Supreme Court in London against that decision, after providing a package of guarantees regarding the conditions of Assange’s detention if he was convicted, including a pledge that he could be transferred to Australia to serve any sentence.


    One last legal battle?

    In June 2022, then-British Home Secretary Priti Patel approved the extradition, and last year a judge at the High Court in London rejected his request to appeal.

    In a two-day hearing starting on Tuesday before two senior judges, Assange's legal team will begin a final attempt to overturn the extradition decision in the English courts.

    If he succeeds, his case will move to full appeal. If he loses, the only remaining hurdle to his extradition lies with the European Court of Human Rights, where he has already applied and which could halt his extradition.

    If Assange is extradited, his supporters say he could be detained in a high-security US prison, and if convicted he could face 175 years in prison. US prosecutors said the order would not exceed 63 months.

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