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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Silently killing our children... Observers warn of the danger of chemical pollutants in Iraq!

    Rocky
    Rocky
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    Silently killing our children... Observers warn of the danger of chemical pollutants in Iraq! Empty Silently killing our children... Observers warn of the danger of chemical pollutants in Iraq!

    Post by Rocky Tue May 21, 2024 5:14 am

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    [size=52]Silently killing our children... Observers warn of the danger of chemical pollutants in Iraq![/size]

    [size=45]Blessed be Abdul Majeed[/size]
    [size=45]“It has been seven years since my son was diagnosed with leukemia. The doctor told me that the reason is due to pollution caused by oil and gas emissions, as we live close to the Rumaila field in Basra,” said Hassan Jawad, who lost his son two months ago.[/size]
    [size=45]Father Hassan (60 years old) blames himself for the death of his 21-year-old son, and wishes that he had been in an economic situation that would have allowed him to leave the area. He says, “The residents find it difficult to leave the city because of the high prices, and the majority of them work in the oil field and services,” and he noted. He had to sell furniture and some valuables to pay for chemotherapy, as the government sector suffers from a shortage of equipment and medicines for treating cancer patients.[/size]
    [size=45]On the other hand, it holds government agencies responsible for the lives lost annually due to chemical pollutants. He added: “Although the concerned authorities are aware of the seriousness of the situation, they are still offering weak solutions. There are many complaints submitted to the owners of oil companies, but the latter continue to deny their harm and claim that they have reduced the rates of burning gas.”[/size]
    [size=45]He confirms that “the region suffers from high rates of disease,” noting that most cases are discovered in the late stages, which makes treatment ineffective, as chemical pollutants silently kill our children.[/size]
    [size=45]According to figures from the Commission for Human Rights dating back to 2019, the percentage of chemical pollution in the waters of the Shatt al-Arab reached 100 percent, and bacterial pollution 60 percent.[/size]
    [size=45]The highest percentage of water contamination with chemical pollutants, according to the Ministry of Environment, occurs in the southern and central governorates. Basra, Dhi Qar, Al-Muthanna, Al-Qadisiyah, Babylon, Najaf, Karbala, then Diyala and Baghdad. Pollutants included (hardness, magnesium, calcium, chlorine, total dissolved salts, electrical conductivity rate, sulphates, turbidity, oil and gas, as all of the mentioned materials exceeded the normal percentages specified by the Health Organization. International and the Iraqi Ministry of Environment.[/size]
    [size=45]Rana Al-Zamili (chemistry major), who works with international organizations to recover mines in affected areas, says, “Iraq did not deal with the issue of chemical pollutants in the required manner, which had a negative impact on the citizens.” She added: “Many citizens have died due to mines and diseases resulting from chemical substances and radiation, which kill completely silently.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Zamili added to (Al-Mada), “The successive conflicts in Iraq, including the attacks that targeted its oil and industrial wealth, have become hotspots for environmental pollution, where large quantities of military waste and toxic chemicals accumulate without proper dealing with them.” “Unless the necessary measures are taken to address this problem, the damage to human health and the environment will worsen, which could lead to indirect impacts on livelihoods,” she warned sternly.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Zamili explains, “Treating contaminated sites in Iraq represents a long-term endeavor and will cost millions of dollars.” It is noteworthy that the World Bank prepared a pilot project at a cost estimated at approximately $18.5 million, which was financed through the Global Environment Fund and the Iraq Reform, Recovery and Reconstruction Fund. This project aims to intervene in 3 to 5 hotspots and develop an effective environmental management plan in Iraq. Al-Zamili wonders about the reasons for not implementing local laws that emphasize protecting the environment and ensuring citizen safety, referring in her speech to the laws of the Ministry of Environment: “We do not see the ministry taking any real action, and its role is not only awareness campaigns.”[/size]
    [size=45]The problem does not stop at chemical pollutants and their negative repercussions and the absence of radical solutions, but rather goes beyond that to create other problems, according to Al-Zamili. She pointed out that cancer patients suffer from a lack of government health care, with a shortage in the country of specialized centers for treating cancer patients. Likewise, those who lost limbs due to mines suffer from the same issue, as the country lacks sufficient centers to provide care and rehabilitation for these people.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Zamili criticizes government measures and describes them as “timid,” noting that Iraq is lagging behind in addressing the issue of chemical pollutants. All statements claiming that there is a reduction in the rates of combusted gas emissions are also false, especially those attributed to the owners of oil companies, and they confirm that “the rate of emissions is still constantly rising, so I do not expect the crisis to end within the next five years.”[/size]
    [size=45]In 2018, the World Bank's assessment of damage and needs in affected governorates estimated that up to 47% of the country's natural forests had been destroyed, while 2.4 million hectares of land had been rendered unusable by landmines.[/size]
    [size=45]Dr. Muhammad Khader Muhammad al-Jubouri, a consultant in climate and environmental affairs, warned of the seriousness of environmental pollution that Iraq suffers from as a result of a group of factors, most notably war waste, the use of chemical fertilizers, and improper disposal of wastewater.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Jubouri told Al-Mada, “War remnants, including internationally banned weapons and destroyed equipment, are a major source of pollution in the affected areas.” “This waste has led to high levels of toxic chemicals in the environment, posing a significant risk to the health of local residents and ecosystems.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Jubouri added, “The use of expired agricultural fertilizers and spoiled soil treatment materials are among the main sources of chemical pollution in Iraq.” “Harmful chemicals from these fertilizers move into groundwater, increasing the concentration of toxic substances in the water consumed by residents.”[/size]
    [size=45]He pointed out that “chemical stores near water sources pose a great danger, as chemicals can leak into the water and increase its pollution.” “The dumping of sewage and household waste into major waterways, such as the Tigris and Euphrates rivers, increases the levels of chemical pollution in the water.”[/size]
    [size=45]Regarding the burning of gas associated with oil extraction, Al-Jubouri explained, “Burning gas associated with oil extraction is one of the most dangerous manifestations of chemical pollution in Iraq. This act not only causes major environmental pollution, but also represents a waste of national gas wealth that could contribute to solving many economic and service problems.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Jubouri touched on the damage and repercussions on the environment, noting that “chemical pollution causes serious damage to human health and the environment. For example, lead exposure is thought to have caused the premature death of more than 5.5 million people in 2019, most of them in low- and middle-income countries. “Lead poisoning also affects the IQ of children under the age of five, leading to significant losses in human capital and negative repercussions on education, productivity, and economic growth.”[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Jubouri stressed that “the Iraqi Ministry of Environment is carrying out its supervisory role by following up on industrial and service activities to prevent pollution and treat cases scientifically.” Among the measures proposed by Al-Jubouri to improve the management of chemicals: Adopting guidelines for sample collection and analysis, ensuring the safety of chemicals before using them, imposing strict environmental and safety standards, using recycled products, consuming cleaning chemicals before their expiration date, in addition, traveling by public transportation or cycling, reusing vegetable and fruit waste. As a plant fertilizer,” stressing the investment of gas associated with oil refining, and the use of electric or hybrid cars to reduce chemical emissions.[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Jubouri concluded by emphasizing that confronting environmental pollution in Iraq requires concerted efforts from the government and civil society. He said: “By adopting strict environmental policies and adopting modern technologies, Iraq can improve its environment and protect the health of its citizens for future generations.”[/size]
    [size=45]For his part, Assistant Director General of the Department of Environmental Awareness and Media, Anam Thabet Khalil, told Al-Mada, “Chemistry is involved in all aspects of life, including the composition of the human body. Therefore, humans need some substances found in nature,” adding that “the danger arises from If chemical levels increase above their normal levels, and humans often contribute to this increase.”[/size]
    [size=45]He explains that “the number of chemicals that cause cancer is limited according to recent studies, and they have different effects and harm on the body’s organs,” and he urged the importance of intensifying research and studies to avoid harm and find effective solutions.[/size]
    [size=45]At the conclusion of the conversation, he stressed that “the Ministry of Environment has legislation and laws related to preserving the environment in this aspect, and there is control and follow-up of stored chemicals and ensuring that they are kept away from citizens and transported properly.”[/size]
    [size=45]Earlier this month, Iraqi Prime Minister Muhammad Shiaa al-Sudani said he aims to eliminate gas flaring within three to five years.[/size]
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