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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    A rare dialogue with Jaafar al-Sadr, the most likely candidate for the position of Prime Minister

    rocky
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    A rare dialogue with Jaafar al-Sadr, the most likely candidate for the position of Prime Minister Empty A rare dialogue with Jaafar al-Sadr, the most likely candidate for the position of Prime Minister

    Post by rocky Sat 19 Mar 2022, 5:41 am

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    [size=52]A rare dialogue with Jaafar al-Sadr, the most likely candidate for the position of Prime Minister[/size]

    [size=45][You must be registered and logged in to see this image.][/size]
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    [size=45]Opinions on politics, religion and foreign relations[/size]
    [size=45]A rare dialogue with Jaafar Al-Sadr, the most likely candidate for the position of Prime Minister - Saif Al-Khayat[/size]
    [size=45]The name of Ambassador Jaafar al-Sadr topped social networking sites and analyzes politicians through various media, as the most likely candidate for the position of prime minister, after surprising understandings between the head of the Sadrist movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, and his fine with the coordinating framework, and perhaps many do not know the biography of the current Iraqi ambassador to the United Kingdom. Well. And here is an interview published by (Al-Zaman), quoting from the WhatsApp group:[/size]
    [size=45](time)[/size]
    [size=45]First, let me start with what some portray as your weak point:[/size]
    [size=45]{Can you tell us about your age? When and where were you born? How many brothers do you have?[/size]
    [size=45]I was born in Najaf in 1970 AD, and I am the only son of Mr. Muhammad Baqir al-Sadr with five daughters. I now have a son and three daughters.[/size]
    [size=45]{It is said that you are related to Musa Al-Sadr?[/size]
    [size=45]- Mr. Musa al-Sadr is my uncle and at the same time he is my father’s cousin, and the experience of Imam Musa al-Sadr, as he is nicknamed in Lebanon, and his public mobilization, openness and tolerance have a great resonance in me.[/size]
    [size=45]{Let us go back a little to the beginnings, the days of childhood and the early formative years in the shadow of the late father?[/size]
    [size=45]Yes, the al-Sadr family is from the city of Kadhimiya in Baghdad. In fact, the emigration of the father to Najaf al-Ashraf was late for the purpose of studying in her scientific possession. Therefore, my birth came in Najaf, where I lived for a short time, about 9 years only. After the ninth year, al-Sayyid and his sister Bint al-Huda were martyred, i.e. in 1980, let us return directly to Kadhimiya, where I lived for a relatively long period, nearly 14 years. There I completed my primary and secondary education and then entered the university to study law.[/size]
    [size=45]{ which university?[/size]
    [size=45]- Baghdad University. But after that, I returned to Najaf for jurisprudence studies and spent two years in its possession until I had to leave Iraq due to the increased dangers of the security situation, not only for me personally, but for the family as a whole.[/size]
    [size=45]{What year did you leave Iraq and to where?[/size]
    [size=45]My departure from Iraq was in 1998 AD, going secretly to the city of Qom at the request of the martyr Muhammad Muhammad Sadeq al-Sadr, who sensed the increasing danger of Saddam Hussein’s regime to the family. Also, Mr. Muhammad wanted me to run his office in Qom and be his agent there.[/size]
    [size=45]What did you gain from Muhammad al-Sadr?[/size]
    [size=45]- He was my teacher as he was a sponsor and educator for me from a scientific and moral point of view, in addition to the ties of kinship between us. In the nineties of the last century, we believed that his movement was a help and hope for us to bring down the regime. You have to place yourselves in the harsh context that Iraq experienced in the nineties of the last century in order to understand the importance and danger of the movement of the second martyr, and the value it represented in the popular conscience at a time when the masses were stinging the fire of persecution and internal oppression on the one hand, and the devastating siege imposed by the outside world on the Iraqis. On the other hand. Yes, there were secret political organizations, but Mr. Muhammad was a pole around him who gathered thousands of simple and deprived people who felt marginalized and alienated. . In fact, the danger of Mr. Mohammed's project is that it is completely free from the mechanisms of state control. Its main army are the common people and the simple people who are resentful of the Ba'ath state. At the time, the masses were looking for a symbol that would defy terrorism and have the legitimacy of leadership. Despite his deep jurisprudential culture, Mr. Muhammad was able not only to find the appropriate words to address the masses, but also to lead their movement. He was fully aware of what was before him and the enormity of what that required of sacrifice.[/size]
    [size=45]Where did you arrive in your seminary studies?[/size]
    [size=45]- When I moved to Qom, I devoted about eight more years to study in its possession until I reached the stage of what is called (studies abroad), which corresponds to higher studies, but I did not ask for her certificate. At that moment, I felt satisfied with jurisprudence studies.[/size]
    [size=45]{About what was the focus of the study in the estate?[/size]
    [size=45]We traditionally study the religious sciences of transmission such as jurisprudence, interpretation and literature, in addition to the mental sciences such as logic, research methods and Islamic philosophy in its various schools.[/size]
    [size=45]So, after 8 years, you stopped studying jurisprudence in the seminary to move to Beirut...[/size]
    [size=45]{Yes, she studied sociology and anthropology at the Lebanese University.[/size]
    [size=45]When you left Iran for Beirut, it was said that you had encountered problems with the Iranian authorities?[/size]
    [size=45]In fact, the reason I left Iran is because I finished my studies at the Hawza. Then there was no more reason to stay. My desire was directed towards academic study, which I feel will serve me in deepening my study of Islam and modernity. In Iran I was only going to study.[/size]
    [size=45]When did you return to Baghdad?[/size]
    [size=45]Immediately after the fall of the regime, in 2003. Since that time, I have been moving between it and Beirut to finish my academic studies.[/size]
    [size=45]When did you decide to enter the political fray?[/size]
    [size=45]Let me check out some of the information that circulated here and there. I do not think that there is a single Iraqi house that is devoid of political opinions and positions, so what about the Sadr House? The Iraqi by nature eats and drinks politics, which means to him (as it means to other peoples) the art and ability to manage public affairs. With regard to me, I have never separated from political follow-up and informal meetings, not only with Iraqi opposition politicians, but most importantly with activists from civil society.[/size]
    [size=45]Are you a member of any political party?[/size]
    [size=45]No, I am not a member of any political party.[/size]
    [size=45]{Why is this staying away from the Dawa Party when your father is the one who founded it? Does this mean that you differ with the ideas of Muhammad Baqir Al-Sadr (Al-Sadr I)?[/size]
    [size=45]I have faced this question many times before. Let me answer you, here as well, with absolute frankness: According to my conviction, personal experience and religious studies as well, I do not believe in the political Islam thesis as presented by some theorists of this, such as the thought of the Brotherhood, the Taliban government, and to some extent the Iranian experience, which deals with the issue through the formal jurisprudential framework. Rather, I believe that religion, which is a basic guide and an original component in our culture, has dealt with various societal issues, taking into account the spirit of change and development. Therefore, it did not present specific formal formulas that could become stagnate and move away from the context of development and natural change. Rather, the approach of religion, especially Islam, was within the framework of lofty principles, values ​​and meanings. Which confirms the necessity of its presence in these areas, whether it is related to family planning, the state, the work of economic institutions or others.[/size]
    [size=45]{You spent eight years in Iran, where politics and religion are close and even overlapping, but you came out of it with different ideas?[/size]
    [size=45]Yes, the experience of living in Iran was a catalyst for liberation from a number of perceptions and ideas that were closer to ideology than the objective perception of the movement of society and its contradictions.[/size]
    [size=45]Do you think that the Iranian revolution made mistakes?[/size]
    [size=45]In every human experience on the ground, there are many mistakes as well as many positives. The important thing is not to insist on the mistake. Herein lies the suspicion of some Iranian officials who turn a blind eye to reality.[/size]
    [size=45]{And what is the reality?[/size]
    [size=45]The reality, according to my understanding, is that the human condition is constantly evolving, and human concepts are in a state of change, and it is not possible to stagnate over concepts and theories that have become in the custody of history. The gains of the present human being must be accepted from democracy, pluralism, individual freedom, and equality among all human beings. If you try to confiscate these gains by violence, you will be outside reality and obstructing history. On the other hand, we must avoid the caricatures that are cast on Iranian society. In Iran there is a dynamic civil society, critical ideas circulate and move very quickly, and forums at home and abroad. No one can ignore the weight of the educated Iranian elite, whether inside or outside the country. There are hundreds of Iranian researchers and thinkers, not only inside their country, but we see them shining in the most important universities and international research centers and presenting important and original theses on the topics of modernity, religion, society and the relationship between them.[/size]
    [size=45]What is your relationship with Muqtada al-Sadr?[/size]
    [size=45]- Mr. Muqtada, in terms of kinship, is a cousin of mine and there is a family relationship as he is my sister's husband. Besides he is a friend of mine and we were colleagues in some of the seminars in Najaf. Besides these natural considerations, I have a lot of respect for him for his courageous patriotic stances, especially with regard to foreign presence as well as his stances calling for openness to other components.[/size]
    [size=45]{You said that you do not believe much in political Islam in the conventional sense. What do you think about secularism? Do you think that Iraq should have a secular system?[/size]
    [size=45]The term secularism in our societies faces a dilemma and historical and heritage problems, and even heavy psychological problems. Therefore, I prefer in my speech to use the term (civilian) or the civil state, which is the formula closest to the British and German model in dealing between state and belief, which I explained to you earlier.[/size]
    [size=45]Do you think that the highest person in the Iraqi state should be religious?[/size]
    [size=45]Religious or non-religious, this is a personal matter and follows his relationship with God Almighty. In return, I support a country that respects the heritage, traditions and beliefs of the people. But I oppose every politician who claims that he derives the legitimacy of his rule from God, or that he rules by order of God, but that he derives his legitimacy from the people.[/size]
    [size=45]{What do you think the biggest problem in Iraq?[/size]
    [size=45]The problems are great and many, but what is important is the tragic aspect of services, the rampant corruption at all levels and even in the security sectors, the lack of real efficiency in managing state institutions, quotas that mean cut-offs for parties, inefficiency and a decline in the service, economic and educational reality.[/size]
    [size=45]The extreme poverty that hits more than a quarter of the population of Iraq, unemployment that devours the Iraqi youth, the misdistribution of goods that created many grievances. In addition to political problems, such as the lack of trust between the parties, the incompleteness of national reconciliation, the politicization of state institutions, and so on.[/size]
    [size=45]{ What do you prefer in the future to be Iraq's foreign relationship?[/size]
    [size=45]Balanced relations must be established with all, based on respect for the sovereignty and independence of both parties, non-interference in internal affairs, and care for common interests. In short, the depth of the relationship with any party will be determined by these constants. Of course, Iraq, with its Arab depth and history, requires keenness to establish distinguished relations with its Arab neighbors, such as sister Syria, Saudi Arabia and Egypt, because I believe that the depth of Iraq is its Arab world and its integration can only take place with its own countries in order to build a regional system that begins with the Arabs and integrates with other countries such as Iran and Turkey so that the region takes its role civilization in today's world.[/size]
    [size=45]And the relationship with the United States?[/size]
    [size=45]After the withdrawal of the American forces, we will be keen to establish distinguished relations with the United States, whether in the economic, scientific or cultural fields. No one can ignore the power and importance of the United States in today's world. And it (the United States) has a moral obligation to compensate the Iraqi people for what they have suffered due to the occupation and the tragedies and grievances of wars, by ensuring the success of the democratic experiment and working to improve the service, scientific, cultural and even security reality of Iraq.[/size]
    [size=45]{Does this include the presence of some US forces to help the Iraqis in the future?[/size]
    [size=45]The security agreement was clear in this regard. There is a timetable that the two parties have committed to and within the framework of a responsible withdrawal of forces. This issue, I think, is now over, but this does not preclude building a solid relationship with the United States, in the areas I mentioned above.[/size]
    [size=45]Do you support the security agreement between Iraq and the United States?[/size]
    [size=45]- That security agreement was the correct and legal way to organize the relationship between the State of Iraq and the American presence, and I think it was, in this respect, positive.[/size]
    [size=45]Did you support the US war on Iraq in 2003?[/size]
    [size=45]No, I don't think anyone supports the invasion of his country. I think it was wrong and life has answered that question. Everyone agrees that Iraq was suffering from an abhorrent dictatorship, and the people were the first victims. As I said before, violence cannot be the only solution to crises. It is possible to envision other forms of assistance to the Iraqis that are more beneficial, not only to them but also to America and its reputation in the region and the world.[/size]
    [size=45]{Some say, had it not been for America, it would not have been possible to overthrow Saddam's regime?[/size]
    [size=45]The Iraqi people have tried many times to carry out revolutions and uprisings against Saddam Hussein's regime, but they have not succeeded.[/size]
    [size=45]The Iraqis needed help and understanding from the freedom-loving and anti-injustice peoples in the world and did not need an invasion and occupation.[/size]
    [size=45]What is important today for the Iraqi people is how to get out of the crisis and build their future.[/size]
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