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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    The New York Times: The Pope ran into a struggle before deciding to visit Iraq

    Rocky
    Rocky
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    The New York Times: The Pope ran into a struggle before deciding to visit Iraq Empty The New York Times: The Pope ran into a struggle before deciding to visit Iraq

    Post by Rocky Thu 11 Mar 2021, 7:26 am

    [size=52]The New York Times: The Pope ran into a struggle before deciding to visit Iraq[/size]
    [size=45]The leader of the Sadrist movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, called for providing protection to activists and civilians, stressing that kidnapping and assassination behaviors are "unacceptable and forbidden."[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Sadr said in an audio intervention via the "Club House" application followed by (Al-Mada), which reads: “I liked to share the topic of a purely humanitarian issue, which is the issue of kidnappings and assassinations that take place in our beloved Iraq, and what happens in terms of clashes between Iraqi brothers, and the exploitation of this issue for other things. Electoral and political, all of which are rejected and prohibited by us, and such matters must be stopped immediately, and the judiciary and the government must intervene legally to end them immediately and to protect all activists and civilians, and all parties, and I advise that there should be no disagreement between the brotherhood in Tishreen and the Sadrist movement, unless Within logic, wisdom and good advice, and without illegal conflicts, so to speak, interspersed with some matters such as kidnapping, murder and dirty talk, which are things that the enemy will exploit, and he is the corrupt third party to conduct and other actions that benefit from it for its spoils, elections, and wrong policies that lead Iraq to the abyss.[/size]
    [size=45]Hours before the intervention, Al-Sadr called for preserving security and the prestige of the state, while commenting on Prime Minister Mustafa Al-Kazemi's initiative to launch a "national dialogue."[/size]
    [size=45]"Some political parties are working to exploit infiltrators in peaceful protests," Sadr said in a speech quoted by his spokesman.[/size]
    [size=45]The leader of the Sadrist movement stressed the need for "the government to carry out its duties to maintain security and the prestige of the state."[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Sadr called for "activating reform dialogue under the supervision of the United Nations, with the exception of everyone who has a Baathist or terrorist affiliation," in a comment on the prime minister's initiative.[/size]
    [size=45]The leader of the Sadrist movement also called on the specialized committees to "return the property of the Christians to continue their project."[/size]
    [size=45]Activists saw that the call made by Al-Sadr yesterday is a reversal of several previous positions during which he attacked the protesters.[/size]
    [size=45]Activists and protesters said through the "Club House" application that "Al-Sadr, who has been attacking protesters and activists for more than a year, has begun to launch reconciliation efforts."[/size]
    [size=45]The Sadrists had participated in the protests since its launch, but they quickly turned against the civilian protesters when the leader of the movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, supported Muhammad Allawi's assignment, while the civilians rejected him.[/size]
    [size=45]At the time, blogger Salih Muhammad al-Iraqi, or what is known as “Minister of Sadr”, expressed his satisfaction at what happened in the squares. He said that things are under control in the square. He also said: "Thank God, for he saved us from the infiltrators and honored us with the patriots."[/size]
    [size=45]In late November, Sadr said in a tweet, "The sit-ins are scanty and in violation of the Sharia and the law."[/size]
    [size=45]Days before that, the leader of the Sadrist movement in Iraq, Muqtada al-Sadr, accused what he called “infiltrators” of the revolution's departure from its peacefulness. He called on the government to "establish security, deter saboteurs, and restore the prestige of the state."[/size]
    [size=45]Al-Sadr wrote: "The invading rioters supported by foreign forces began to push the revolution out of its peace, especially after the Prime Minister (Mustafa Al-Kazemi) announced that the security forces would not be armed."[/size]
    [size=45]The leader of the Sadrist movement called on the government to “extend security and deter the impudent from sabotage, destabilizing security, opening roads, and restoring the prestige of the state. Otherwise, this indicates collusion with those with foreign agendas and perverted ideas,” without naming them.[/size]
    [size=45]A month ago, while the protesters were confronted with live bullets and assassinations in Nasiriyah, the leader of the Sadrist movement, Muqtada al-Sadr, denounced, in his tweet on Twitter, the attack by infiltrators against the security forces in Nasiriyah.[/size]
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