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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    International organization: 26% of Iraqi women are exposed to domestic violence

    Rocky
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    International organization: 26% of Iraqi women are exposed to domestic violence Empty International organization: 26% of Iraqi women are exposed to domestic violence

    Post by Rocky Mon 27 Nov 2023, 3:24 pm

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    [size=52]International organization: 26% of Iraqi women are exposed to domestic violence[/size]

    [size=45]Translated by / Hamed Ahmed[/size]
    [size=45]The International Organization for Migration (IOM) revealed in its report on domestic and community violence that one out of every three women around the world is exposed to some form of physical violence or sexual harassment, and that there are more than 1 million women and girls in Iraq who are exposed to violence, indicating that 26% of Iraqi women expressed their exposure to violence at the hands of their husbands.[/size]
    [size=45]The report indicated that recent years have witnessed an escalation in cases of violence against women and girls around the world, and despite the horrific statistics of these cases of violence, they unfortunately do not include other forms of violence that are often not reported, including verbal, psychological and economic violence. Mina Raad, community police colonel in the women’s department in Baghdad, says, “We face a big problem with cases of domestic violence that go unreported.” As for the women who come to report, upon revealing this, they are asked to seek assistance from a female community police officer, not a male officer.”[/size]
    [size=45]The international organization states in its report that women and girls are not just victims, but rather they play an important role in preventing, combating and confronting violence. Community organizing in Iraq, for example, encourages partnership between the public and the police to maintain security and safety based on community needs. Community police officers are unarmed, come from the communities they serve, and engage in extensive outreach so that others can reach them. Sarah Kazem, who works in the strategic center of the community police department in Baghdad, says, “It is very necessary for a woman to occupy a job position as a member of the community police officer corps.” Our contribution is empowering women to speak more freely. This means that a woman exposed to violence is more psychologically prepared when she presents her problem to another feminist, unlike when she confronts a male community police officer.” Pointing out that the community police are dedicated to building trust between people and law enforcement institutions, through which only support and support can be provided to women.[/size]
    [size=45]Souad heads the IOM legal team in the Tal Afar region of Nineveh, where she provides free legal consultations, awareness-raising lectures, and support to communities affected by displacement. According to her, within the traditions of Iraqi society, they do not accept a woman presenting her problems to a strange man, and this increases the importance of the participation of a female element in the community police department.[/size]
    [size=45]The international organization states in its report that the lack of civil ID documents for some women increases their exposure to violence. Without official papers, women are exposed to the risk of economic control by their partners and family members.[/size]
    [size=45]Ayat, a lawyer with the legal team of the International Organization for Migration, says, “Without marriage contracts, women cannot obtain official, legal identities for their unregistered children, which in turn cannot enable them to enter school.” Pointing out that without legal documents, their financial assets will be subject to control by partners and family members, as well as control of their real estate, making them vulnerable to exploitation.[/size]
    [size=45]Lawyer Ayat adds, “The women we support are happy when they share their stories with a female lawyer.” There are certain cases that are so sensitive that women cannot disclose them or discuss certain issues with a male lawyer.”[/size]
    [size=45]The fact that women are able to communicate and speak freely, without hesitation, is vital to preparing a solid legal case in which justice can be achieved.[/size]
    [size=45]Souad, a lawyer from the international organization’s team, says, “I was the first female lawyer in the Zummar and Rabia region. There were no women lawyers before that. After me came five other female lawyers who joined the court.”[/size]
    [size=45]The report indicates that feminist leadership is increasing within Iraqi civil society, especially when it comes to protecting women and girls from violence.[/size]
    [size=45]Kawthar Al-Muhammadi, a civil activist and head of the Suqia Foundation for Relief and Development in Fallujah, supported by the International Organization for Migration’s Civil Connection Fund, says, “Women have the drive to achieve change. However, because of the marginalization we face, we often bear the burden of others’ mistakes, as they turn us into tools for fueling conflicts.”[/size]
    [size=45]Her foundation supports women's economic empowerment through skills, capacity building, and training to enter the field of local industries, as well as providing psychological support to women.[/size]
    [size=45]Dalia Al-Maamari, a civil activist from the Humanitarian Line Foundation supported by the International Organization for Migration in Mosul, confirms that every woman has the right to live without fear and without violence. Her foundation provides legal, psychological, and economic support services to women victims of war, and the foundation also works to empower them to participate in cultural, social, and economic activities effectively.[/size]
    [size=45]• About IOM[/size]
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