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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    A bloated public sector and a depleted budget... the consequences of arbitrary employment policies

    Rocky
    Rocky
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    A bloated public sector and a depleted budget... the consequences of arbitrary employment policies Empty A bloated public sector and a depleted budget... the consequences of arbitrary employment policies

    Post by Rocky Mon 27 May 2024, 5:29 am

    [size=38]A bloated public sector and a depleted budget... the consequences of arbitrary employment policies[/size]


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    May 27, 2024[You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]
    Baghdad/Al-Masala Al-Hadath: It appears that the financial policies followed by the government of Muhammad Al-Sudani led to a significant increase in government spending, especially on salaries and social spending. While this may be welcome in the short term, it has placed a significant burden on the Iraqi budget.
    It is noteworthy that Iraq relies heavily on oil export revenues, and if they decline sharply due to fluctuations in global oil prices, this will make it difficult to bear large increases in spending.
    Economic analyzes indicate that increasing currency printing or reducing investment expenditures will not be radical solutions.
    It seems that restructuring the government sector and rationalizing the number of employees and salary costs will be a necessary step to control the Iraqi budget and make it more sustainable in the long term.
    But this structural change will be politically difficult, and will face popular opposition, as I mentioned, given the dependence of a large segment of citizens on government jobs and salaries. Therefore, the government will need determination and courage to take these difficult reform steps.
    The salaries of public sector employees are considered one of the largest expenditure items in the Iraqi budget, as they account for approximately 25% of total government expenditures annually. The number of state employees is estimated at about 4 million employees, which is a very large number relative to the size of Iraq's economy.
    The Iraqi government allocates huge sums of money to support basic commodities such as energy and food, which greatly increases the financial burden.
    Iraq faces the burden of repaying internal and external debts accumulated over years, which drain a large portion of the budget annually.
    Due to the tense security situation in Iraq, military and security expenditures occupy a large share of the budget.
    These large financial burdens on the Iraqi budget limit the government's ability to spend on development and capital investments necessary to stimulate long-term economic growth.
     
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