Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Join the forum, it's quick and easy

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Would you like to react to this message? Create an account in a few clicks or log in to continue.
Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    an American report reveals Iran's link to attacks against Iraqi Shiites and its relationship with al

    Rocky
    Rocky
    Admin Assist
    Admin Assist


    Posts : 272488
    Join date : 2012-12-21

    an American report reveals Iran's link to attacks against Iraqi Shiites and its relationship with al Empty an American report reveals Iran's link to attacks against Iraqi Shiites and its relationship with al

    Post by Rocky Sun Sep 09, 2018 2:53 am

    [size=32]
    an American report reveals Iran's link to attacks against Iraqi Shiites and its relationship with al Qaeda[/size]
    [You must be registered and logged in to see this image.]

     [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]    

     one hour ago




    A long-standing study by the New America Center in Washington revealed a long-term relationship between Iran and al-Qaeda, and that this cooperation was aimed at enabling al-Qaeda to serve its interests.
    The study was based on 300 classified documents obtained by the CIA after the attack on the compound where al Qaeda leader Osama bin Laden lived in Abbottabad, Pakistan in 2011.
    According to the report, the cooperation between Iran and Al-Qaeda was not "strategic" because of "ideological differences and lack of trust between the two parties." Their relations were because of the "mutual interests required by the circumstances of each stage."
    The report focused on two CIA documents, one of 19 pages devoted to the relationship between al-Qaeda and Iran? According to this document, any cooperation that Iran might offer to al-Qaeda would be based on serving its foreign policy against the United States. The document described the policy as characterized by "real adversity" and that it was not a "virtual play".
    The document said Iran was "ready to provide support and assistance with money, arms, and whatever is needed" and that the Iranian regime "embodies political pragmatism" based on "the end justifies the means."
    The document goes further by stating, among other things, that the Iranians "suggested to some (new jihadists) training in Hezbollah camps in Lebanon to attack American interests in Saudi Arabia and the Gulf."
    According to one document, Iran tried in 2004 to persuade bin Laden to mediate to stop Abu Musab al-Zarqawi's attacks against Shiites and their holy sites in Iraq.
    According to the documents, al-Qaeda's view was that Iran had initially developed a "flexible policy" towards it since its founding in 1988. "The members of the organization, and even members of the Bin Laden family, did not find it necessary to resort to Iran after the 11 attacks September, and the aftermath of the fall of the Taliban. "Al Qaeda also used Iran as a conduit for smuggling people and money in secret.
    However, the documents do not hide the mistrust between the two parties and portray al-Qaeda as a hostile entity. The visit or establishment of al-Qaeda members in Iran, "despite some objections, was a temporary haven or a safe passage for other countries, As illustrated by the documents.
    The mistrust between Iran and al-Qaeda has proved an al-Qaeda document that describes the United States as the "current enemy" and that Iran is the "delayed enemy."
    At the same time, al-Qaeda members in Iran have been arrested many times, for example, after some of them have defied their residency conditions, or passed opinions that the Iranian government has violated Iran's policy. Iranian intelligence has also been active in following these individuals, spying on them, monitoring their telephone communications and their movements.
    But Iran's policy toward al-Qaeda changed from what it was during the 1980s and 1990s when the September 11 attacks on the United States, Bush's war on terror and Iran's "axis of evil."
    According to the New America Center report, the factor of mistrust has been reduced, for two reasons: on Iran's side, it wants alliances with it against the United States. On the al-Qaeda side, Iran needed shelter after its leaders fled Afghanistan.
    The documents revealed that "Al-Qaeda" was "pragmatic in its efforts to secure refuge for its leaders, or to release its leaders who were arrested here and there."
    "Because of al-Qaeda's commitment to its ideological principles, especially its rejection of the legitimacy of the regimes of Muslim countries, including Iran, they are hindering cooperation at a more strategic level," the New America report said.
    "Al-Qaeda challenged the international community by launching a global terrorist campaign while rejecting the legitimacy of the world order and rejecting the legitimacy of regimes in member states of this world order," the report said.
    Last month, a team of UN experts reported that al-Qaeda leaders in Iran "became more influential" and were working with radical Islamist leader Ayman al-Zawahiri to influence events in Syria. The report quoted ambassadors of UN member states that the Iranians and Zawahri "collaborated with a group linked to al-Qaeda in Idlib."
    The report said the relationship between Iran and al Qaeda was strong in the 1990s when Imad Mughniyeh, a leader of the Hezbollah militia, met with Osama bin Laden to "exchange experiences between the two sides."
    "Bin Laden's documents obtained by the CIA reveal Iran's support for al-Qaeda," bin Laden wrote in his private letters. "Iran is our main corridor for money, individuals and correspondence."
    The report quoted dissidents from the ranks of the organization of this relationship linking Iran to al-Qaeda. "Some of his comrades traveled to Lebanon, where they were trained, on how to carry out bombings at the hands of Hezbollah," said Jamal al-Fadl, an al-Qaeda operative who broke away from the organization during a terrorist trial in New York. "I saw one of those tapes showing how to make explosives to destroy large buildings," he said.
    The report by an American commission of inquiry into the September 11 attacks revealed how Iran and Hezbollah provided al Qaeda with "technical expertise" that was instrumental in carrying out the bombings of the US embassies in Kenya and Tanzania.
    Earlier this year, a British newspaper published a report that Iran planned to "send al-Qaeda from the womb of the Da'ash organization." "This was through coordination between Tehran and al-Qaeda military leaders who traveled to Damascus to assemble the ranks of Da'ash fighters and to establish a new base similar to the Quds Force and Hezbollah.
    The report said that the leadership of the International Alliance fears that Iran will take advantage of the defeats suffered by an organization in Damascus and Syria to revive Al Qaeda, "by exploiting the historical ties linking al-Qaeda with Iran since the defeat of al-Qaeda in Afghanistan."
    The report, entitled "Tehran in alliance with the devil to rebuild al-Qaeda": "Iranian generosity played a major role in the revival of al-Qaeda."



    [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]

      Current date/time is Mon Jun 24, 2024 7:10 am