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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    World Bank: Reconstruction of liberated areas cost $ 45.7 billion

    Rocky
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    World Bank: Reconstruction of liberated areas cost $ 45.7 billion Empty World Bank: Reconstruction of liberated areas cost $ 45.7 billion

    Post by Rocky Tue 13 Feb 2018, 1:35 am

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    World Bank: Reconstruction of liberated areas cost $ 45.7 billion




    Translated by Hamid Ahmed
    According to a new intelligence study by experts from the World Bank and the Iraqi government, the US-backed military campaign that led to the defeat of a militant group in Iraq has caused damage estimated at $ 45.7 billion. 
    A team of experts has used a huge array of satellite images of the affected sites and published photographs in social networking sites for the preparation of the report, which is the largest comprehensive study of the destruction caused during a war that lasted more than three years. 
    "Iraq is now emerging from a phase of war and subversive violence," the study said, adding that the current focus is on restoring livelihoods to millions of people in agriculture, services and industry.
    The Baghdad government has failed to rehabilitate the affected areas in five provinces in northern and western Iraq so that IDPs can return to their homes and rebuild their lives, leaving them vulnerable to the influence of extremists and exacerbating sectarian tensions. 
    Last month, the number of Iraqis who returned was the number of people who are still displaced. Yet with more than 2 million people displaced, many of those who have returned are now living in dilapidated buildings with limited services. In the ancient city of Mosul, the bodies are still buried under the rubble. 
    According to the World Bank's speculative study, damage to the housing sector was $ 16 billion, while damage to power plants and the electricity sector amounted to $ 7 billion. Damage to the education sector was estimated at $ 2.4 billion.
    School rehabilitation is the first priority in a country with an average population of 20 years, and most schools in Mosul, Ramadi and Fallujah have been devastated. 
    The report estimated the damage by comparing the infrastructure situation in December 2017 with the period leading up to a pre-emptive attack in 2014. 
    The guesswork study does not attempt to determine how or to cause such destruction, whether it is the result of haunts or booby-trapped cars or strikes American Air. 
    According to the study's estimate, if the cost of improving the performance of local governments in these destroyed provinces is added, with the improvement of the infrastructure of their oil and gas facilities and other rehabilitation expenditures, the size of the needs in these governorates will increase to $ 88.2 billion.
    On the other hand, Iraqi officials hope to get more money from donor countries for the purpose of reconstruction and all those countries have heard that the Iraqi government is seeking about $ 100 billion in foreign investment spent in the sectors of energy, agriculture and transportation. 
    Prime Minister Haider al-Abadi admitted last month while attending the Davos Economic Forum in Switzerland that the reconstruction campaign "needs a huge sum of money" as he went to spur foreign investors attending the conference to invest in reconstruction projects in Iraq. 
    "We know that we can not save the cost of reconstruction from our budget, and we also know that we can not provide these funds through grants, which is almost impossible, that is why we resorted to reconstruction through investment," Abbadi told reporters.
    Iraq's budget has been hit by falling oil prices, the main source of its financial resources, making it dependent on most foreign investment or reconstruction aid. 
    The size of the needs to be covered by the Iraq reconstruction donors' conference in Kuwait is not known, but America hopes that its allies in the Gulf will be ready to help. 
    "There will be a need for funding, so I think that the Gulf countries, not necessarily the government side, but private financing and other companies, can play a very important role in helping to fund these projects implemented by companies," a senior US government official told the Wall Street Journal. A private sector inside Iraq. " 
    The United States has so far spent billions of dollars in the war against da'ash and humanitarian aid to displaced Iraqis and Syrians, but does not intend to participate in additional reconstruction grants in Iraq.
    Instead, US export and import banks are planning to sign a memorandum of understanding to facilitate project financing.
     About: The Wall Street Journal

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