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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    Which farmers are most affected by the drought... on the banks of the Tigris or the Euphrates?

    Rocky
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    Which farmers are most affected by the drought... on the banks of the Tigris or the Euphrates? Empty Which farmers are most affected by the drought... on the banks of the Tigris or the Euphrates?

    Post by Rocky Mon 28 Aug 2023, 5:19 am

    Which farmers are most affected by the drought... on the banks of the Tigris or the Euphrates?



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    2023-08-27 14:41
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    Shafaq News/ The significant decrease in water imports coming to the Tigris and Euphrates rivers caused an expansion of the desert areas during the past few years, which poses a threat to water and food security and its effects on agricultural plans. This coincides with the climate changes that struck large agricultural areas of the country. Mesopotamia.




    According to the Ministry of Agriculture, the area of ​​land cultivated with wheat and barley during 2022 decreased from 11,600,000 dunums to less than 7 million dunums, which is the lowest percentage of cultivation for the two crops in many years.

    According to the Ministry of Agriculture, Iraq has lost about two million dunums of vegetation over the past ten years.

    The Ministries of Agriculture and Environment warn that the country loses 100,000 acres annually due to desertification, and the water crisis has caused a 50% decrease in agricultural land.

    Last March, Prime Minister Muhammad Shia al-Sudani confirmed that seven million Iraqis had been affected by climate change.

    Iraq relies on feeding its rivers annually on water coming from Turkey and Iran, and for years the Iraqi governments have been calling on the two countries to negotiate solutions to the issue of water sharing, without achieving significant positive results.

    The Tigris River originates from the Taurus Mountains in Turkey, flowing south into Iraq, passing through Syria, and meeting the Euphrates River at the Shatt al-Arab. Its length is 1850 kilometers, and it has several tributaries, the most important of which are the Diyala River, the Great Zab River and the Little Zab River.

    The Euphrates River also originates from Turkey and crosses the Syrian lands to flow into the Iraqi lands, where it meets in the south with the Tigris River, to form the Shatt al-Arab.

    In this context, Tahseen al-Moussawi, a water resources expert, says, "The Tigris basin has more than one resource, 56 percent depends on Turkey, 12 to 15 percent depends on Iran, and the rest is internal natural resources. As for the Euphrates basin, it is 100 percent of the resources." Turkey, Iraq and Syria being downstream countries.

    Al-Moussawi explained to Shafaq News agency, "The Euphrates Basin, during the days of water abundance, had revenues of 30 to 40 billion cubic meters annually, and it used to meet the Tigris in the Karma region and flow into the Shatt al-Arab, but due to the lack of revenues, it stopped years ago in Al-Muthanna Governorate." .

    And he confirms, "The Euphrates basin is dying now, and has reached late stages, after it used to receive, along with the Syrian side, 500 cubic meters of releases per second, and Iraq's share of it was 58 percent, but this share has shrunk and sometimes reached the limit."

    The water expert concludes by saying, "The percentage of the population that lives on the Euphrates basin in agriculture is more than the Tigris basin, so the greatest damage was their share."

    The United Nations Development Program in Iraq had confirmed, earlier, that the marshlands are the most vulnerable to the effects of climate change, noting that the country loses about 400 thousand dunums of agricultural land annually due to climate changes.

    According to the forecasts of the "Water Stress Index" for the year 2019, Iraq will be a land without rivers by 2040, and the waters of the two rivers will not reach the final mouth in the Persian Gulf.
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