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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


Iraq workers are victims of the lack of safety requirements

rocky
rocky
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Posts : 205325
Join date : 2012-12-21

Iraq workers are victims of the lack of safety requirements Empty Iraq workers are victims of the lack of safety requirements

Post by rocky Fri 22 Oct 2021, 6:50 am

[size=52]Iraq workers are victims of the lack of safety requirements[/size]

Baghdad
hello dry
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Accidents of deaths are still recorded on a daily basis among workers (Hamen Baban / Anatolia)

[size=45]Despite the repeated promises made by governments to improve the conditions of  [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]   in  [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  , including obligating employers and projects to provide the necessary protection and security equipment for their employees, deaths are still recorded on a daily basis among them in various Iraqi cities. An official in the Iraqi Ministry of Interior in Baghdad told Al-Araby Al-Jadeed that "at least 10 deaths among workers in Iraq occur at a weekly rate, many of them due to the lack of safety requirements." The official, who preferred to remain anonymous, added that “most of the death incidents are resolved by a clan settlement between the victim’s family and the employer, within the [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  custom. [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  social or class. This comes by offering compensation to the victims' families, who are usually poor people who accept compensation, as Iraqi law will not compensate them or pay them a salary. Thus, they prefer compensation from the employer in exchange for the forced waiver of the complaint.”
As for the Ministry of Labor and Social Affairs, it acknowledges a shortcoming in the issue of protecting workers in most economic activities in the public and private sectors. The deputy director of the National Center for Occupational Health and Safety in the ministry, Mashreq Abdel-Khalek, stated that “the inspection teams of the center have monitored accidents and injuries as [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  result of the lack of  [You must be registered and logged in to see this link.]  In the private and public sectors” to safety requirements, explaining that this is due to the lack of health and safety conditions and the lack of awareness of the importance of their availability to preserve the lives of workers. Abdel-Khaleq pointed out in his previous press statements that “monitoring and recording work injuries in various sectors and economic activities is done through cooperation with health authorities authorized under the labor law,” adding that “disseminating a culture of occupational health and safety would reduce injuries to preserve production elements, and in The introduction is the human element, but most projects do not give this aspect the required importance, which puts the lives of workers at risk.”[/size]
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people's economy

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[size=45]For his part, the head of the Labor and Immigration Committee in the outgoing parliament, Raad Al-Dahlaki, confirmed to Al-Araby Al-Jadeed that “there is a need for legal legislation in this regard. Therefore, the retirement and social security law was put on the voting table before the elections, but the work committee did not have time to complete this law, unfortunately.” Al-Dahlaki points out that “the new parliament will continue to approve the retirement and social security law, because it is one of the most important laws that pertain to the life of workers and citizens,” explaining, “We went to this law to guarantee the rights of young workers in the private sector. The recurrence of accidents involving workers is due to weak legislation and lack of application of the law. The laws after 2003 (the history of the American occupation of Iraq) began to be applied temperamentally.” Al-Dahlaki stresses that “there must be a state of real institutions that abide by the laws, as the law must guarantee the rights of workers and the poor.”[/size]
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[size=45]In this context, Saad Al-Karkhi, a member of the Federation of Iraqi Trade Unions, told Al-Araby Al-Jadeed that “the rights of workers in the country have been almost completely absent for 18 years,” explaining that “successive parliaments did not do justice to them through legislation. Likewise, the governments that have taken power since 2003 have not taken any steps that would advance the deteriorating situation of workers.” Al-Karkhi shows that “the wages of the Iraqi worker reach 25 thousand Iraqi dinars (about 17 US dollars) at best, and this amount is not enough for him to support his day after the significant increase in prices as a result of the government’s decision to reduce the value of the dinar against the dollar at the end of last year.” He adds that "a significant number of workers were exposed to accidents, some of which led to death or caused disability, without providing any compensation to the injured and the families of the dead, whether that was from the factories and companies in which they were working or by the government."
In a related context, the winning candidate in the elections, Hussein Arab, a former deputy, asserts that “Iraq lags behind the rest of the world in everything. The Iraqi state has not been able to provide guarantees for various segments, including workers.” Arab adds to Al-Araby Al-Jadeed: “We do not have clear strategic plans to guarantee the rights of workers,” explaining that “the new parliament’s passing of the retirement and social security law will greatly guarantee the rights of workers.”[/size]
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people's economy

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[size=45]Arab points out that "this law, if approved, will provide workers with health insurance and pension salaries, stressing that "the procedures for occupational health and safety and civil defense are weak in all work sites in Iraq, except in rare cases." Arab continues that "the lack of oversight led to the disregard for people's lives, and the dissolved parliament had formed seven months ago committees to monitor factories, where preventive measures are not available." Arabs stresses the "necessity to punish those who cause harm to workers," noting that "there are those who have been referred to the judiciary." Arab continues, “The task of Parliament is to legislate laws that preserve workers’ rights, while the government’s job requires the implementation of these laws. It is necessary to work to achieve a qualitative prosperity in the provision of services to workers.”[/size]
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    Current date/time is Mon 06 Dec 2021, 5:22 am