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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Many Topics Including The Oldest Dinar Community. Copyright © 2006-2020


    What after the cancellation of the "Khor Abdullah" agreement?.. Will Kuwait ask Iraq for 6 billion d

    Rocky
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    What after the cancellation of the "Khor Abdullah" agreement?.. Will Kuwait ask Iraq for 6 billion d Empty What after the cancellation of the "Khor Abdullah" agreement?.. Will Kuwait ask Iraq for 6 billion d

    Post by Rocky Tue 05 Sep 2023, 6:50 am

    What after the cancellation of the "Khor Abdullah" agreement?.. Will Kuwait ask Iraq for 6 billion dollars in debt? - Urgent
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    Baghdad today - Baghdad 
    Today, Tuesday (September 5, 2023), the economist, Nabil Al-Marsoumi, suggested that Kuwait would ask Iraq for approximately $6 billion in debt, in the event that the “Khor Abdullah” agreement was cancelled.
    Al-Marsoumi said, in a clarification he posted on social media platforms and followed by “Baghdad Today,” that “after the Supreme Federal Court in Iraq ruled that the law ratifying the maritime navigation agreement in Khawr Abdullah with Kuwait was unconstitutional, claims appeared for some Kuwaiti deputies for Kuwaiti loans and interest on Iraq that were not paid.” Until now" . 
    He added, "It is known that the origin of the Kuwaiti debts owed by Iraq was about 6 billion dollars to Kuwait, and this can be considered a debt through the submitted documents. As for the rest of the claims, they cannot be considered a debt, because they are a mixture of several components, including:
    1- Exporting oil for Iraq in the neutral zone between the two countries, as Saudi Arabia agreed with Kuwait to produce the equivalent of 1.3 million barrels of oil per day and market it for Iraq.
    2- Paying the debts owed by Iraq to others or guaranteeing Iraq towards them.
    3- Equipping Iraq with civilian means that serve the war effort, such as mechanisms, transporters, iron for military subjects, and barbed wire. And that these were specifically donations and support for the war effort.
    4- Providing facilities in Kuwaiti ports and exemptions from transit fees and customs clearance. Therefore, the Iraqis do not see that all of this is loans because there is no evidence for that, as it is likely that they are gifts or aid, especially since the political motive was behind that aid. All of this brought Kuwait's debt with interest to $22 billion, as estimated by Bank of America Merrill Lynch.
    And Al-Marsoumi added: "Although Kuwait confirms that it has official documents showing the transfer of these funds to Iraq, but from a legal point of view, the reality of the transfer that was achieved is not sufficient to prove that Iraq bears any claim to re-pay any amount unless the transfer conditions are specific and binding."
    He pointed out that "if Kuwait insists on its rigid positions and legal interpretations regarding its refusal to apply the principle of "abhorrent" religion, then Iraq should not hesitate to defend that these transfers do not constitute loans without a written contract proving them.
    The expert concluded his clarification by saying that "the principle of "abhorrent" debts, which says that a debt that is not used for the benefit of the people, but rather in support of corruption and oppression of dictatorship, is a debt that lacks legal legitimacy, stressing that "the ideal solution to Kuwait's debts is the need for a national effort." It is great to call for the establishment of an arbitration court to look into “abhorrent” debts, and it has the power to decide which of these debts are reprehensible debts and which of them are legitimate legal debts, and thus the first one that constitutes most of them will be dropped.
    Yesterday, Monday (September 4, 2023), the Federal Supreme Court ruled that the law ratifying the maritime navigation agreement in Khor Abdullah with Kuwait was unconstitutional.
    And the media of the Federal Supreme Court said, in a statement, that the court decided, in its session held today (yesterday), in case No. (105 and its uniform 194 / federal / 2023) to rule on the unconstitutionality of the law ratifying the agreement between the government of the Republic of Iraq and the government of the State of Kuwait regarding the regulation of maritime navigation in Creek Abdullah No. (42) for the year 2013.
    He added, "The court issued its decision in violation of the provisions of Article (61 / Fourth) of the Constitution of the Republic of Iraq, which stipulated (the process of ratification of international treaties and agreements is regulated by a law enacted by a two-thirds majority of the members of the House of Representatives."
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    What after the cancellation of the "Khor Abdullah" agreement?.. Will Kuwait ask Iraq for 6 billion d Empty The cancellation of the Khor Abdullah agreement complicates the border scene.. and Kuwait is armed w

    Post by Rocky Wed 06 Sep 2023, 4:54 am

    The cancellation of the Khor Abdullah agreement complicates the border scene.. and Kuwait is armed with a UN resolution

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    Baghdad today - follow-up
    With the increasing complexities and the ambiguous position on how to solve the land and sea border problem between Iraq and Kuwait, the decision of the Federal Supreme Court added to the ambiguity of the scene, after it decided that the 2013 Khor Abdullah agreement between Iraq and Kuwait was unconstitutional.
    The court justified its decision "for violating the provisions of Article (61 / Fourth) of the Constitution of the Republic of Iraq, which stipulates that the process of ratifying international treaties and agreements is regulated by a law enacted by a two-thirds majority of the members of the House of Representatives."
    The Iraqi court's decision brings to the fore the border problems between Baghdad and Kuwait, which the two countries pledged to overcome recently, after the gradual improvement in relations over the past years.
    Saadoun Hussein, a professor of international relations in Baghdad, described the border problems between Iraq and Kuwait as "a fire under the ashes," indicating that it is a time bomb that could explode at any moment.
    On the other hand, the former Kuwaiti Minister of Information, Saad bin Taflah Al-Ajmi, believes that the Iraqi court's decision is "an internal Iraqi matter of no importance to Kuwait."
    What is Khawr Abdullah agreement?
    After a long political debate between the two countries that lasted for more than two years, the Iraqi Council of Ministers approved, in January 2013, an agreement with Kuwait related to regulating navigation in Khawr Abdullah, which overlooks the Gulf waters.
    The Iraqi Council of Representatives approved the border agreement later in the same year to enter into force in an official capacity, although it is widely opposed by Iraqi politicians.
    The agreement provides for dividing the waters of Khor Abdullah equally between the two countries, based on the United Nations Security Council Resolution "833" issued in 1993, which re-demarcated the borders in the wake of the Iraqi invasion of Kuwait.
    Iraqis object to this agreement because they consider that it gives Kuwait the right to territorial waters inside Iraq, which impedes the movement of maritime trade in front of the country's limited ports.
    What is the Iraqi government's choice?
    The annulment of the Supreme Court in Iraq came after a lawsuit filed by the parliamentarian, Saud Al-Saadi, although the court itself rejected a similar lawsuit in December 2014.
    Hussein, a professor of international relations, believes that the Iraqi government is "obligated" to implement the decisions of the Supreme Court, given that its rulings are not subject to appeal or appeal.
    He said the Iraqi government's only option is to "go to parliament and ask for a re-vote on this agreement, in line with court decisions."
    In the 2014 case, the Iraqi Supreme Court itself refused; because the lawsuit “is not based on the basis of the constitution or the law”; Because Article 61 / Fourth of the Constitution was not legislated during that time, according to court papers.
    Hussein said that the decision, which requires parliament to ratify international treaties and agreements by a two-thirds majority, was issued in 2015.
    The Supreme Court also rejected in the 2014 case that the agreement harmed the Iraqi side, because this does not fall within its jurisdiction.
    The new decision would bring the border disputes back into the limelight again between Iraq and Kuwait, although the two governments are committed to moving forward to end this old file.
    Last July, the foreign ministers of Kuwait and Iraq confirmed, during their meeting in Baghdad, their commitment to ending the file of demarcation of the maritime borders between the two countries.
    After the new decision, Representative Al-Saadi wrote on the "X" website (formerly Twitter): "We say to the Iraqi fishermen: Practice your fishing as you like, as Khawr Abdullah has returned to you, and no one has the right to attack you."
    The Kuwaiti Coast Guard sometimes confiscates or stops Iraqi fishermen's boats, for illegally entering Kuwaiti territorial waters.
    "Iraqi internal affairs"
    However, the former Kuwaiti minister, Al-Ajmi, said that "Kuwait has nothing to do" with the rulings of the Iraqi judiciary, in response to a question about the repercussions of the court's decision on the Gulf state.
    He added that this is an "internal Iraqi matter," noting that the issue of land and sea borders between the two countries is "completely resolved" by an international resolution of the United Nations.
    He explained that the 2013 agreement to regulate navigation in Khor Abdullah dates back to the Security Council resolution in 1993, which was approved by former President Saddam Hussein and the Iraqi National Council, according to Al-Ajmi.
    And he continued, "What governs our relations with Iraq are international resolutions issued by the Security Council that were agreed upon.. The two governments have bypassed this file, and the matter is over for Kuwait and is no longer of importance."
    Al-Ajmi believes that "the problem of Iraq" is that "it is living in a transitional and turbulent phase with regard to its borders and even its existence... There are parts of Iraq that are not controlled by the central government."
    He cited the Turkish presence in the north of the country, and the repeated incursions by Iran in the east, in addition to the Kurdistan region, which has become a de facto separate country from Iraq, according to his description.
    "Deep in Basra"
    On the other hand, Hussein said that the problem of the Iraqi-Kuwaiti border will remain "lurking without a solution" because of what he described as the "bullying" of Kuwait by an international decision.
    He added, "If Kuwait wants to live in peace and security, it must not transgress the borders of Iraq, which it took in a difficult Iraqi circumstance.. Its (Kuwait) borders are now deep in Basra, and this is a problem, as the legislator, the politician, and the Iraqi citizen feel wronged."
    Hussein said that "any change in the balance of power in the Gulf" could raise the issue of the borders of the two countries again, adding: "A strong Iraqi president could invade Kuwait again," he said.
    Source: free
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