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Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

Welcome to the Neno's Place!

Neno's Place Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality


Neno

I can be reached by phone or text 8am-7pm cst 972-768-9772 or, once joining the board I can be reached by a (PM) Private Message.

Established in 2006 as a Community of Reality

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    After Iraq banned the import of sweets, Iran is on the list of affected countries

    Rocky
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    After Iraq banned the import of sweets, Iran is on the list of affected countries Empty After Iraq banned the import of sweets, Iran is on the list of affected countries

    Post by Rocky Thu Feb 22, 2024 6:59 am

    After Iraq banned the import of sweets, Iran is on the list of affected countries, 11:07 |
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    Baghdad today - follow-up
    The imposition by the Iraqi authorities of a broad ban, the first of its kind, on the import of chocolate, sweets and pastry products, as part of its efforts to support local production, led to the cessation of its import from many countries, most notably Turkey and Iran, but the latter was most affected by the extensive trade in this type of product within the Iraqi market. During the year 2020, it amounted to more than $201 million, according to a previous report published by the Iranian Fars Agency, about the Iranian Import Authority.
    On the twenty-seventh of last month, the Iraqi Customs Authority imposed a ban on the import of all types of cakes, pastries, chocolate, sweets, and others.
    The authority said that these instructions came in the context of the authority’s keenness to protect the Iraqi market from food products that do not conform to Iraqi specifications and standards, in addition to striving to support local Iraqi food products and strengthen the national industry.
    The decision of the Iraqi authorities quickly contributed to the re-emergence of many traditional Iraqi local products, including sweets and pastries, after the decline of imported ones, whose quantities began to decline in the markets since the second week of their ban.
    On the other hand, Iranian media reported that Iraqi merchants have stopped their purchases of these products and their export has stopped at the present time, in compliance with the decisions of the Iraqi authorities.
    The Federation of Iraqi Industries in the capital, Baghdad, announced its support for any decision that includes banning the import of goods and products from abroad or imposing customs duties on imported goods, not only from Iran but from all countries of the world.
    Union spokesman, Karar Al-Qaisi, said that Iraq today is different from what it was in previous years, as products imported from abroad are not comparable in quality or efficiency to industries and products produced locally.
    Al-Qaisi explained that local production is subject to standardization, quality control, health and economic oversight, and local sweets products differ from imported products in terms of taste and packaging, in addition to the presence of Iraqi expertise and competencies with a long history in this aspect.
    He added that local production of sweets and pastries now covers the market’s needs and there is no need for imports. There are factories specialized in these industries that operate with high quality and efficiency, exporting their products to more than 14 countries.
    He pointed out that the problems facing local industries are related to several factors, most notably the open borders for smuggling and excessive imports, in addition to the weak state support for the local sectors of fuel and electricity.
    Al-Qaisi explained that the list of food industries that are produced locally, in addition to sweets, includes soft drinks, dairy products, and pastries of all kinds (croissants and cakes), in addition to the Union’s efforts to produce a school food basket, which includes a complete food group for primary school students.
    According to sources within the Customs Authority, the decision entered into force, taking into account the existence of import contracts for merchants whose prices were paid, which prompted Customs to grant a grace period.
    The same sources confirmed that the decision concerns all countries, but since Iran is the most present in the Iraqi market, the decision had the greatest impact on it.
    She explained that the decision was circulated to all of Iraq’s land ports, along with Saudi Arabia, Kuwait, Turkey, Jordan, Turkey, and Iran, without exception.
    But the Iraqi economic affairs expert, Abdul Salam Hassan, ruled out the possibility of implementing the decision for a long period, stressing that there are parties that control import operations from Iran that do not comply with the instructions and laws in force of the Iraqi state.
    Hassan added that the Iraqi economy is greatly threatened due to the failure to implement economic laws, and poor management and strategic planning of economic institutions, including customs and trade.
    He pointed out that government decisions are weak and not binding on many parties, and the issue of importing from Iran is not related to the quality of its products or the need of the market, but it is related to the sustainability of the Iranian economy at the expense of Iraq after the imposition of American sanctions.
    For his part, a member of the Federation of Iraqi Chambers of Commerce, Subih Al-Hashemi, said that Iran’s objection to banning the import of sweets and pastries from Iran is normal, because it considers Iraq a major market for exporting its products and industries.
    Al-Hashemi stressed that Iraq remaining a country consuming products and goods, even simple ones, contributed to disrupting Iraqi local production and industry.
    Al-Hashimi called for the necessity of developing accurate scientific studies and data that show the volume of local production compared to the level of consumption, so as not to ban the import of certain goods that are not available on the local production list or that do not cover the market need.
    He stressed the importance of having alternatives to products whose import is banned, especially with the presence of imported goods of poor quality and low prices, but they do not find competition or alternatives within the list of local production.
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